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Breckland Security Covers Swaffham

Breckland Security covers Swaffham and offers a complete range of security services delivered by our team of professional, fully licensed and vetted guards. The security services available include static security officers, manned security guards, mobile security patrols and key holding alarm response all specially tailored to local areas like Swaffham.

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  • 10 Disturbing Unsolved Cases Of Missing HeadsCrime Robert Grimminck February 21, 2016 Decapitations are unsettling simply because they re gruesome. Yet, despite the barbaric nature of the act, there are plenty of reasons why someone chooses to decapitate another person. It s even more disturbing when someone s head is cut off and the head is never found.

    10 Robert Hollis On the afternoon of June 4, 2015, 75-year-old Robert Hollis s son was checking in on him after neighbors grew concerned because they hadn t seen the elderly man, affectionately nicknamed Mr. Bojangles, in a few days. When the son entered his partially blind father s Inglewood, California, apartment, he made a gruesome discovery: His father was dead and decapitated.

    Even more disturbing, the killer took Hollis s head when he or she left the apartment. It has never been found. Hollis s family is unsure who would have killed the elderly man because he didn t have any enemies.

    He was even friends with his ex-wife. His family also said that valuables in the house were untouched. Police are still looking into the death.

    The mayor of Inglewood also arranged a $50,000 reward for information regarding the murder. Despite this, no arrests have been made.

    9 The Cheltenham Torso Mystery On February 3, 1938, fishermen on the Severn River near Cheltenham, England, found a man s torso tangled up in their nets. When it was examined, officials said that it appeared to be the torso of a well-fed, middle-aged man.

    One arm had been removed cleanly, but the other one had been hacked off with an axe. The river was dragged. The man s legs and arms turned up, but no head or hands could be found.

    Without them, police weren t able to identify the body or determine the cause of death. Speculation arose that the body belonged to 52-year-old Captain William Butt, who had lived in Cheltenham with his invalid wife and her live-in nurse, Irene Sullivan. Butt had gone missing in January 1938.

    The theory was that Irene Sullivan and her 28-year-old son, Brian, were arranging illegal abortions. Brian, who worked as a dancer and a gigolo, was also having a sexual affair with Butt. At some point, something went wrong with the relationship, and Butt threatened to expose the illegal abortion ring.

    Two weeks after the torso was discovered, Brian committed suicide by gassing himself inside his home. Under some flagstones on his property, police found Butt s keys and his coat, which was covered in blood. As the body was never identified, the case remains unresolved.

    8 Wallingford Body In A Box On the morning of August 8, 1886, a man was walking his dog in the township of Wallingford, Connecticut, when he came across a box that was 75 centimeters (30 in) long and 30 centimeters (12 in) wide. It looked like the box was full of shoes. As the dog got closer, it became interested in the box.

    But the man could smell an awful aroma emanating from it. The man went home, gathered up some neighbors, and they went back to the box. They opened it and found that the box was lined with tar paper.

    Inside, there was also a man s torso. The medical examiner found no marks on the chest that would indicate how the man died, and there was not much decomposition. During the autopsy, it was discovered that the man s stomach was full of arsenic.

    So the medical examiner believed that the man had been poisoned. The ME also thought that the man had been about 30 years old and had probably weighed around 80 kilograms (175 lb). After the murder, the townspeople found a bag at the bottom of a well.

    But when they returned the next day to retrieve the bag, they couldn t find it. The only evidence that it had ever been there was a piece of human scalp that was found next to the well. It was believed that the killer was hiding near the well and then moved the bag after it was discovered.

    Later, in September 1886, the legs and arms were found near the body wrapped in paper similar to the tar paper that had lined the box. The police traced the box from a shoe company in Fall River, Massachusetts, to a wholesaler in Chicago. The wholesaler had kept the box in the backyard of his store until it was purchased by a young man who supposedly disappeared.

    Any eyewitnesses either recanted their stories or refused to answer any questions. Eventually, all the leads went cold.

    7 Russell And Shirley Dermond Russell Dermond, 88, and his wife, Shirley, 87, lived in a waterfront gated community on Lake Oconee in Georgia. They had been married for 68 years.

    On May 6, 2014, some friends went to the Dermonds house. Inside the garage, they found Russell s headless body, but Shirley was missing. Ten days later, her body was pulled from the lake by a pair of fishermen.

    She had been killed by multiple blows to the head, possibly with a hammer. Police said that they had forensic evidence but no suspect to whom they could match it. They believe that the motive for the double murder of the couple was most likely robbery or extortion.

    They also think that the killer or killers arrived at the house via a boat. This is how the killers would have avoided cameras at the gated community. Police believe that at some point, the killer went into the yard where he was seen by eyewitnesses.

    But no description was given, except that it was a man.

    6 The Norfolk Duchess On August 27, 1974, near Swaffham in Norfolk, England, a man walking on the beach found a badly decaying woman s body wrapped in a plastic sheet that was bound with some rope. When the police opened the plastic sheet, they found that the victim was headless, her hands and feet were bound, and she was wearing a pink 1969 Marks & Spencer nightdress. The medical examiner said that the woman was probably between the ages of 23 and 35.

    Besides the body, the police had a few unique clues to investigate. The plastic sheet had the National Cash Register s logo printed on it, and it was one of only six sheets made. The rope was also unusual.

    It was made using four threads, but most rope is made from three or five threads. Yet, after a long investigation, the sheet and the rope didn t lead anywhere. In 2008, the body was exhumed, and tests were performed.

    They learned that the woman had probably given birth, had drunk water in Scotland, and had eaten a lot of fish and crab. From reports, it is believed that she might have been a prostitute, known only as The Duchess, who came from Denmark and worked the Great Yarmouth docks. The Duchess disappeared around the time that the body was found.

    Police are hoping that DNA will help them to identify the woman s family in the near future.

    5 St. Louis John Doe Photo credit: Warren County Sheriff s Office via foxnews.com In 1987, a hunter came across the headless and handless body of a man in a wooded area near St. Louis, Missouri.

    Police believe that the man was between 35 and 45 years old. He was white and had seven broken ribs. He also had a scar on his abdomen, possibly from an old gunshot wound that wasn t treated professionally.

    The man was dressed well. He was wearing a dark blue T-shirt from that year s Rose Bowl. It declared the Michigan Wolverines as the champions.

    He was also wearing new, white Nike high-tops and Oscar de la Renta jeans. In his pockets, there was 82 cents and a token from the Kansas City International Airport. There were also traces of alcohol and cocaine in his system, leading to some speculation that the headless man was involved in the drug trade.

    It was also believed that he had died four or five days prior to being found and then his body was dumped in the wooded area. In March 2015, the body was exhumed with the hopes that further tests would help to identify the victim. If he was identified, that information has not been made public as of February 2016.

    4 Julia Baez Photo credit: Jackson County Sheriff s Office via wqow.com On October 10, 1990, body parts of a woman were found in two shallow graves in an industrial park in Brockway, Wisconsin. The dismembered body parts were wrapped in garbage bags, but the head was nowhere to be found. The recovered body parts were buried, and the case went cold.

    The woman would remain a Jane Doe for 25 years until her body was exhumed in 2015 and a DNA test was performed. When compared to a database for missing and unidentified people, they discovered that Jane Doe was really Julia Baez, a 36-year-old mother of four from Milwaukee. Her home was about a three-hour drive from the grave where her body was found.

    The last time anyone had seen Baez was in June 1990. Her family had spent years looking for her, and her children had given their DNA to the database, which is how investigators made the match. Police hope that identifying the victim will give them new leads as to who is responsible for Baez s death and dismemberment.

    3 The Kharkiv Beheadings On the night of December 15, 2012, police believe that at least two people entered the home of Volodymyr Trofimov. He was a judge in Kharkiv, Ukraine s second-largest city. Once inside the home, the intruders attacked the judge, his wife, Irina, his 30-year-old son, Sergei, and his son s 29-year-old girlfriend, Marina Zoueva.

    The judge, Irina, and Marina were all killed and then beheaded with some type of long blade. Sergei, on the other hand, was decapitated while he was still alive. Their heads were never found.

    There are three main theories as to why the judge and his family were murdered. According to the first theory, the attack was symbolic. In Ukraine, December 15 the day of the deaths is known as Judge s Day, a day to celebrate the country s judges.

    Ukrainians were unhappy with their justice system at the time of the murders. So the decapitations could have been a symbolic attack against the justice system. The second theory is that the murders could have been revenge for any number of cases that Trofimov presided over during his 30 years as a judge.

    The final theory is that the murders occurred as part of a robbery. The judge was a world-renowned collector of coins and antiques. A number of antiques were stolen after the murder, but it is unclear if that was actually the reason for the murders.

    With so many theories and not enough clues, the high-profile case has gone cold.

    2 Peter Levine After school on February 24, 1938, 12-year-old Peter Levine of New Rochelle, New York, was walking home with a friend. Along the way, Peter stopped off at a hardware store. After he left the store, he disappeared.

    Peter was from a well-off family. His father was a high-end New York lawyer. The family received three ransom notes demanding $60,000.

    Peter s father tried to follow the instructions on the notes, but the kidnapper(s) went silent. The kidnapping made national headlines. It was made into movie reels shown in movie theaters, and it was talked about on national radio programs.

    On May 29, three months after the kidnapping, Peter s headless and mutilated corpse washed up on the shore of Glen Lake, not far from where he had disappeared. His hands and feet were also missing. The boy s body was bound in copper wire, and he was wearing the same clothes that he had been wearing when he went missing.

    Stitched into his clothes was his name, confirming that it was Peter. The FBI investigated the kidnapping and murder, but no suspects were ever named.

    1 St. Louis Jane Doe On February 28, 1983, a car carrying two men broke down near an abandoned apartment building in St.

    Louis, Missouri. The two men ventured into the building looking for a pipe to repair their car. Instead of finding what they needed, the men came across the headless body of an African-American girl.

    The medical examiner believed that the girl was 7 12 years old. She had been strangled three to five days before her body was found. After her death, she had also been decapitated with a long-bladed knife.

    Her hands were bound, but it wasn t clear if she had been sexually assaulted. Lastly, she died and was decapitated elsewhere, and then her body was dumped in the building. The police checked all of the schools in the area to see if any children were missing, but everyone was accounted for.

    When no one claimed the body, she was buried as a Jane Doe. The case went cold, but it wasn t forgotten. In 2009, the police tried to exhume the body.

    But the cemetery had become defunct over the years, and the donated marker was placed on the wrong grave. So no one knew the actual location of the body. A group of volunteers finally found the grave, and the body was exhumed in summer 2013.

    Through mineral tests, it was determined where the girl had probably spent most of her life because of the water she had drunk. It is believed that she probably lived in one of 10 states in the Southeast: Tennessee, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, North Carolina, or South Carolina. The identity of the girl, the whereabouts of her head, and the person or persons involved with her murder remain a mystery.

    Robert Grimminck is a Canadian freelance writer.

    You can friend him on Facebook, follow him on Twitter or on Pinterest, or visit his website.

  • 1950s Sitting Room will Help Patients with Dementia A hospital day room has been completely transformed into a 1950s sitting room to help patients with dementia at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. A retro tv, clock, mirror, wireless, sideboard and other furniture from the era when Elvis and Cliff ruled the pop charts have taken the room back to a time that will help patients relax and reminisce. The 12,000 transformation was the idea of staff who have set about fundraising and been helped by a 10,000 donation from David Mackie from Norfolk s Ivy Child Trust.

    Welcoming Fifties style turquoise wallpaper that meets strict infection control guidelines is topped with a mock picture rail. Three birds fly on a wall in formation and a pin board shows Norfolk photos from the era, there is even an effect that looks like a real fire. The room also has books, football programmes, catalogues and leaflets from the era as well as games like draughts, dominoes the Beetle game and the Amazing Robot.

    1950s day room A DVD player means patients can watch old news reels and historic events from when Princess Elizabeth became Queen, Churchill was Prime Minister, James Dean died and Lego bricks were invented. Vintage cups and saucers for tea parties complete the look to help stimulate conversations with patients in their 80s and 90s. As most of the patients are in their nineties the hope is that those with dementia will feel that the room looks familiar and will help spark memories and conversations.

    It will also provide a relaxing place for relatives to talk to staff or patients. The project was supervised and designed by Hospital Art s Co-ordinator Emma Jarvis who said, We really wanted to create a 1950 s feel to the room but had to ensure it met all the correct regulations and was able to provide up to date facilities with the look of the 1950 s. I am so glad that all the hard work has paid off and that our patients will get joy from being in this dayroom .

    Deputy Sister Julie Payne who started the fundraising said For patients with dementia familiarity makes their stay better. The patients love it. It s the only room like it in the hospital and we re so proud of it.

    Louise Cook Fundraising Manager said, This is just one of a number of dementia projects which require charitable funding across the hospital.

    The more we can help fund projects which can support and provide a relaxed environment the better it is for our patients.

    We are incredibly grateful to our staff and all those who have fundraised for this project to take place

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  • 25th January – 31st January | Jim Daly Greyhound Racing They say time fly s when your having fun and January seems have gone by so quickly We ve ended this month with just over 28% win strike rate, so that s very pleasing indeed There s been some decent performances this week, most noticeably Tyrur Rhoda who completed a hatrick of wins and two of those came last week. The first win was Tuesday 26 January on RPGTV where Tyrur Rhoda went into a maiden open off A5 form at Yarmouth. She belied her 7/1 starting price when producing a good start to lead all the way Rhoda followed up on Saturday when back at Yarmouth in A5 grade winning at 13/8f and clocking her best time to date.

    Kelva Maestro chalked up his first open win at Harlow on the Racing Post TV card too. Maestro is a homebred pup who hasn t enjoyed the best of luck but a recent A1 win and open race win proves he s in good form just now Performance of the week for me must go to Gimme Lollie. I love this little dog to the max.

    He always brightens up my day and loves giving everyone cuddles and kisses!! On Saturday night he won a D1 sprint worth 163 Drawn trap one, he was crowded and bumping with the two dog in the race all the way to the first bend but Gimme Lollie or Jimmy as he s known at home was just so determined and forced his way to the lead at the first bend before going on to land his second race in succession Jimmy was a non chaser when we started schooling him. His owners thought he would be retired without racing at that point He just had no interest to chase an artificial lure As a last resort we changed the lure on our whirly and put a black and white stuffed penguin toy on it After weeks of showing no interest Jimmy suddenly decided to chase the toy penguin!!

    We can only think that the black and white contrast of colours brought about his change of interest Whatever it was, he never looked back from that day and Gimme Lollie is as honest as the day is long Kelva Keane, an October 14 home bred pup made a winning debut on Saturday night at Yarmouth Only just old enough to race and first time under lights, Keane walked out of the boxes, got crowded slightly first bend but still managed to produce a strong finish to win.

    Keane is a promising Ballymac Eske pup and we are syndicating him within our Jim Daly Racing syndicate You can own a share in Keane now for just 100 For more Info contact our admin Jemma on 07802 704979 or email Jimdalygreyhounds@hotmail.co.uk

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  • 360 Business Networking comes to Watton The Breckland View Connecting Communities 360 Business Networking have announced that following the successful launch last year in Dereham the group is now coming to Watton, and are inviting local business to the first meeting on 9th September the Broom Hall Country Hotel, we will meet at 7:15 and be finished by 9am.

    Subsequently we will meet on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month, dovetailing nicely with the 1st and 3rd Fridays when the Dereham branch meet

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  • 5 Family Tickets East Anglian Game & Country Fair The 2015 East Anglian Game & Country Fair will take place on Saturday the 25 th & Sunday the 26 th April, at The Norfolk Showground, Norwich. Iceni Post has teamed up with the East Anglian Game & Country Fair to provide you with the chance to win one of five family tickets. The Five entries drawn out of the hat were from: Beccles x 2, Kings Lynn, Stowmarket, & Great Yarmouth Entry closing date was 31st March 2015 But you still have time to Save Money by Booking in Advance!

    Advance Discounted Ticket Prices Adult 13.00 Children 5-16 Years 5.00 Family (2 Adults & 3 Children 5-16yrs) 36.00 Under 5 s Free A 2 booking fee applies per transaction. (Closing date for advance discounted tickets 20/04/15) If you would like to speak to one of our team about tickets, camping or membership please feel free to call us on 01263 735 828 or email info@ukgamefair.co.uk 1 The East Anglian Game & Country Fair is an annual two day, family event set in glorious parkland at the Norfolk Showground, Norwich. We welcome world class events and attractions to the Norfolk Showground each year. Whether it s watching the main arena or countryside arena displays, seeing the forestry village with cutting and pole climbing competitions, joining in with your dog at the K9 Aqua Dog pool, shopping at the 300 tradestands or relaxing with a glass of bubbly at the members enclosure.

    We hope you will find something for the whole family to enjoy at the show, including your dog. Visit our show events and attractions pages online to view a selection of the fantastic displays on offer at the Game Fair. www.ukgamefair.co.uk 2 See more details about the fair here 3 advert We can promote your business 4 every week on the Iceni Post!

    Related References ^ info@ukgamefair.co.uk (icenipost.com) ^ www.ukgamefair.co.uk (www.ukgamefair.co.uk) ^ East Anglian Game & Country Fair, April 25th & 26th 2015 (icenipost.com) ^ business (icenipost.com)

  • 50 Christmas Trees in a Church, Dickleburgh – The Winners 2015 ... Annie Chapman with the Ladies Tractor Road Run tree The 12th annual 50 Christmas Trees in a Church at All Saints Dickleburgh, drew to a close on Sunday, December 6, with the prize-giving for the 23 most popular trees voted by visitors to the festival. Ladies Tractor Road Run (for Cancer Research UK s breast cancer appeal) was the winner in the adult category for their tree decorated with tiny pink bras. Susan Whymark Funeral Service came second with an amazing dress tree and Culrose Residential Care Home were third with their gingerbread themed tree.

    1st Dickleburgh Rainbows, with Harleston District Girl Guiding s plastic bottle tree.

    1st Dickleburgh Rainbows, who combined with Harleston District Girl Guiding, won the children s category with their fabulous plastic bottle tree, displaying Christmas messages of hope. Harleston CE VA Primary School came second with their Hands of Hope tree and Burston Community Primary School was third with their gingerbread house tree. The Nick Arnull Plate, for the most innovative tree, was shared by Susan Whymark Funeral Service and 1st Dickleburgh Rainbows with Harleston District Girl Guiding.

    The Christmas Tree festival has raised 2,000 for EACH (East Anglia s Children s Hospices) and a donation will also be made to Norfolk & Norwich Hospital Oncology Department, with residual funds being retained by the Benefice of Dickleburgh and the Pulhams. Rowena Roskelly, one of the festival s organisers, said: We have had an excellent week. I would particularly like to thank all the volunteers who helped set up the church and look after visitors throughout the Christmas Tree festival.

    Thanks also go the local organisations and businesses who contributed such a superb collection of decorated trees; many congratulations to all the winners. This has been the last 50 Christmas Trees in a Church at Dickleburgh, although some of the volunteers are thinking about running something different in the church during Advent 2016. For more information about 50 Christmas Trees in a Church , including the full list of winners, see www.50christmastrees.com 1 .

    Related References ^ http://www.50christmastrees.com Ctrl+Click or tap to follow the link (www.50christmastrees.com)

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  • A mixed welcome in Norfolk It was good to go to Swaffham, in Norfolk s Brecklands, for the annual get-together of the Walkers Are Welcome 1 Towns Network. Swaffham is the only WAW town in East Anglia and it certainly gave us a great welcome, with an excellent meeting in a super venue. Buttercross, Swaffham Less welcoming was the shoot taking place on Castle Acre common on the afternoon of Saturday 19 October.

    The Iceni Partnership , which organised the conference, arranged three walks for us. I went on the Nar Valley Way from Castle Acre to West Acre and back (about three miles each way).

    2 3 Castle Acre priory The path runs along the north side of Castle Acre common which straddles the river. Nar Valley Way alongside Castle Acre common The shooting was taking place on the common, which is public-access land.

    The Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 gives the public the right to walk on all commons which had no pre-existing access . Shooting on the common Landowners can carry out their own activities on access land, but they need to tell Natural England and advertise the access restriction. In the case of shooting, obviously they must put up notices and arrange for people to be posted at all access points to prevent walkers from being shot.

    There were no notices and no one to warn us. The shooters didn t stop when we passed by on the footpath. I have complained to Norfolk County Council, the access authority, but so far have not had a satisfactory response.

    This was dangerous, walkers were at risk, and the incident should be followed up to ensure it does not happen again. West Acre common The council should also arrange for access signs to be put up at all the access points onto common land. There was none on Castle Acre common nor on West Acre common, yet we passed some obvious access points.

    For many, the rights to enjoy these commons are a well-kept secret. The sign below (not a county council one) on West Acre Common exacerbates the confusion. Yes, strictly speaking, it is private property, just as all land in this country belongs to someone, but those words in large letters are off-putting to walkers.

    Then if we read on, we see that we are welcome , as if the landowner is generously giving us permission, whereas of course we have the right to walk here. A county council public-access sign would make things clearer. Sign on West Acre common Path maintenance in Norfolk is patchy and inconsistent.

    The total recorded network is about 2,400 miles. Half this length, 1,200 miles, is branded Norfolk Trails 4 . These routes get higher priority and waymarking.

    The stretch of the Nar Valley Way which we walked is well signed with sparkling new waymarks. There are more waymarks on the Nar Valley Way than on the unpromoted paths The unpromoted routes are not so well cared for. Of course all the paths are public highways, and Norfolk County Council has a duty to keep them all in good order.

    This two-tier system is damaging for those which are not named trails.

    Norfolk has fewer paths than many counties, due to the predominance of influential landowners when the definitive maps were prepared in the 1950s, so it really has no excuse for neglecting any of them.

    About these ads 5 References ^ WAW (www.walkersarewelcome.org.uk) ^ Iceni (www.icenipartnership.info) ^ Nar Valley Way (www.norfolk.gov.uk) ^ Norfolk Trails (www.norfolk.gov.uk) ^ About these ads (en.wordpress.com)

  • A Music of Grief, Classical Music and The First World War ... - IceniPost This year s Wymondham Music Festival music lecture by Dr Kate Kennedy is A Music of Grief, Classical Music and The First World War .

    The lecture is free to attend and starts at 7.30pm on Tuesday 3 June, at Fairland Church Centre.

    The event is supported by Rotary Club of Wymondham and Fairland United Reformed Church.

  • A musical tribute to David O'Neale by Breckland Harmony Some of you may not have heard of David O Neale but he was very well-known in the musical circles of Norfolk both in schools as a teacher and amongst musicians and singers throughout the county. He also had a passionate interest in local history and wrote several books about the village of Bridgham where he lived. His influence in Wayland came as musical director of the fledgling ladies choir, Songbirds now better known as Breckland Harmony back in 1997.

    David had a flair for making tuition fun and under his guidance, the choir expanded their repertoire to include all genres of song from madrigals and fugues to songs from the shows and pop. Sadly David, at the age of 59, passed away last year as a result of Motor Neurone Disease and Breckland Harmony, now under the guidance of Julia Grover, is holding a concert at Bridgham Church as a tribute to his positive influence and encouragement over the many years he was with the choir. Please join us in this celebration at 7.00 p.m.

    on Saturday 28 November. Tickets cost 5.00 and can be bought from Julia Grover tel: 01953483654, e-mail julia464@btinternet.com, or on the door. There will be a raffle and all proceeds will go to the MND Association (charity no.

    294354).

  • A Norfolk Schoolboy's Memories of W.W.II | joemasonspage I was born on December 3 rd 1928, so World War II came upon me at the age of ten until I was fifteen. I was fortunate that I lived first in the quiet market town of Harleston until October 1942 and then in the village of Methwold until 1946. At Harleston I attended the Junior School until I progressed to Bungay Grammar School.

    Living at Methwold I attended Downham Market Grammar School. I left there at the age of fifteen in July, 1945. By early 1939 every household in the country had received a booklet on how to be ready for war.

    Even cigarette cards carried air raid precautions. These we collected and swapped at school. There were plans for the distribution of air raid shelters to homes in areas most likely to be hit by bombs.

    Air raid sirens were erected. Gas masks were issued and special smaller ones for babies. The gas masks were in almost square boxes on strings.

    Very soon mothers were making covers for them. We had to take them everywhere with us and periodically we had to practice wearing them at school. They would smell very rubbery and were claustrophobic to wear, the visors steaming up.

    On 1 st September 1939 war with Germany seemed imminent and many thousands of children, some with parents, were evacuated from London and boroughs, many of them to Norfolk. I was friendly with one boy who lodged with the butcher at the top of London Road. He didn t stay long; many preferred the risk of bombs to the oddities of the countryside.

    There were two girls who lodged in a big house (the old school perhaps) opposite Redenhall church. I cycled home with them once from the swimming pool at the river, Wells Lane I think. They were friendly with another girl Dawn C.

    At 11.15a.m. Sunday, 3 rd September 1939 war was declared on Germany. The government had advised the safest rooms were those in the centre of the houses.

    My mother and I had single beds in the sitting room which was central. I don t know where my father slept. Everything was rationed, ration books were issued to every household and each had to register with their local shop.

    The ration books came into use the following year. At school, to support the war effort, we were encouraged to knit scarves for merchant seamen probably one plain one pearl in navy blue mine finished six feet long! In 1940 each person was allowed 4 ounces of butter, 12 ounces (345 gr) of sugar, and 4 ounces of ham or bacon each week.

    As the war progressed there was even less. Everything was sold on surrender of coupons. In Dad s garden up Station Road there were copious quantities of rhubarb.

    Mum made jam and it was rhubarb with everything. How I hated it. Marjorie L from next door told me the daughter of the previous sergeant had peed on the rhubarb so that probably put me off.

    Mum would save the sugar rationing to make jam. We had our own jars but when mine was going down quickly I would pinch some of Dad s. As well as the food rationing there was a blackout which meant no light was allowed to show from within buildings, prevented by blankets or special screens or similar hung over the inside of doors and windows.

    Windows were taped to prevent damage from flying glass, among other Air Raid Precautions published in a special Government booklet issued to all premises in the country. Vehicle lights were dimmed with masks, coal was rationed as were sweets. Mum would scrape butter onto rounds of bread and then scrape it off again.

    I used to love sandwich loaves of bread. I could eat nine or ten rounds. I looked for air holes which would get filled with butter.

    I liked Sunday tea when Mum would get out her best tea service which was pink and the edges trimmed with gilt. I wonder what happened to it ? Sometimes we would have tinned salmon which I enjoyed soaked in vinegar.

    On one occasion I was ill and my mother was so pleased that she was able to obtain a few bananas for me from the local greengrocer. This was wintertime and the bananas had come from the Canary Isles. On another occasion she was able to buy a few tomatoes.

    I didn t think about it at the time but they had to come by ship over many, many sea miles, running the gauntlet of German U Boats. I was in the choir at St. John the Baptist church in Harleston.

    During the long sermons I used to pass the time by drawing aircraft and air battles on the white pages of the prayer and hymn books, inspired by the Battle of Britain fights. When my voice broke I was designated to pumping the organ. There was a long passage beside the organ, the wall being covered in whitewash.

    I soon got busy covering all this space with my drawings. Often it meant I forgot why I was there until I noticed the organ was getting precariously low on air which meant I had to pump furiously to get the weight back down again. Soon after we had moved to Harleston a bathroom and toilet were fitted into the box room above the kitchen.

    Mum s contribution to the war effort was to invite the grand-daughter of a couple living up our lane to use our bathroom when she came home on leave from the WAAFs ( Women s Auxiliary Air Force.) Denis and I would g o off on our cycles, usually on Saturdays, armed with my copy of Bacon s Cyclists Map of Norfolk. We would find churches and try to get into their towers but we weren t lucky very often. However on this map I marked the locations of Army camps and airfields which would have been a boon to enemy spies!

    At the beginning of the war there was a big Government campaign to Dig For Victory encouraging the growing of vegetables at home. A local builder allowed my friend Alan to have an allotment on the field at the rear of Alan s home. It was from here on Saturday, 23 rd July, 1940 we saw in the distance German planes apparently dropping bombs on Pulham Airfield, The Germans did try unsuccessfully to destroy it.

    It had been an R.A.F. Station during W.W.I. first in 1915, and it had been the home of R 33 and R 34 airships.

    Today the village sign proudly depicts the R 34 at its moorings. On that occasion in 1940 the Germans dropped sixteen high explosive bombs but there were no casualties. There were several other raids and the big hanger was hit on one occasion.

    On another occasion German bombs were dropped into a field just passed Frank Spurgeon s premises at Mendham Lane and killed two ponies. I didn t see it happen but saw the bomb craters the next day. I wrote a little essay about it but my teacher was not impressed.

    Soon after the war started our head teacher, Mr. Rhodes, volunteered for the army. I don t know what happened to him.

    A Mr Pilch took over. He didn t like me because my father had told him off for riding his bike without lights. He seemed to take a delight in taking it out on me in petty ways!

    I didn t have to put up with him for long because it must have been in the September, 1940, I started at Bungay Grammar School. At Bungay there were air raid shelters to which we had to hurriedly retreat when the siren went off. The shelters were damp and smelly.

    Sometimes a teacher would try to give a lesson. Other times we would sing morale building war-time songs. The other side the pub next door was a large house occupied by a doctor Maidment.

    There was great excitement when his daughter married an army officer by the name of Vickers. Mum and I watched them from a front bedroom window drive off to go on their honeymoon in a large open topped car. One wartime memory is of a captured German Messerschmitt fighter plane being put on display just into the entrance of Harleston Recreation Ground.

    The object was to boast public morale. Quite distinct in my memory now is the sickly sweet smell of the engine oil. Some of the local boys spent a long time unsuccessfully trying to remove parts for souvenirs.

    On one occasion a German Dornier bomber crashed in a field at Starston. One of the crew, the pilot, was killed. He was buried at Starston church until after the war when his remains were moved to Germany.

    The other crew member was locked up in the cells across the yard at the back of our house. I was never allowed to see any prisoner. My mother or the Constable s wife had to provide meals for the prisoners.

    A most vivid memory in my mind is of one night in October 1941. I was asleep in bed. I was eleven years old I was awakened by the loud roar of aeroplane engines.

    Quickly looking out of my bedroom window I saw a Wellington bomber go past, very low and a ball of flames. The next day I learned it had crashed in a field up Jays Green, a little past our school. It had come down with such force it was almost fully buried into the soil.

    All the crew perished . On yet another occasion Denis and I were near the drill hall, getting walnuts off a tree just outside someone s gateway. A twin-engined German bomber came over so low we could see the crew inside looking down at us.

    We were both very frightened and hurried home on our bikes but nothing untoward happened. It was in 1941 that Sergeant Stanley George Kybird was killed while flying a Spitfire fighter plane in France. He was from the Elveden branch of the Kybird family.

    One vague memory I have is just once having a ride in a Bren gun carrier. I think an Army sergeant took us. His wife was staying with friend Alan A s family at Candlers Lane.

    I remember seeing my first Americans. They were coloured and very smart. This was at Harleston market place.

    They were employed helping with the construction of the airfields in the vicinity, and there were many. Laings carted the gravel. Early in the war the American air force was known as the USAAF Army Air Force but later it got shortened to USAF.

    When they first flew from Hardwick it was the 310 Bomb Group ( Nick named Ted s Travelling Circus ) using B 26 Mitchell medium bombers. They were at Hardwick from September until November, 1942. Alan A and I would cycle there and throw sticks up at them as they took off but of course they were too high for us to hit them.

    Denis L, the boy from next door, and I would go exploring. For some reason we were attracted to a little copse of the lane at the bottom of Needham hill. Here we found a ground covering layer of certain commodities left behind by Americans after interludes with some of our local girls.

    Unfortunately some of the girls were left with more permanent reminders of these occasions, two in particular! Placed around the town were a number of pillboxes from which, with the necessity, soldiers or Home Guard troops could fire on approaching Germans. This of course did not happen.

    However, these pillboxes provided cover for all sorts of illicit past times. In the case of Alan A and myself, we had surreptitious smokes in one at the top of Mendham Lane. Pillboxes were rapidly constructed at the beginning of the war, in 1940 and 1941, constructed of brick or concrete, with concrete tops.

    They had one entrance and slits in the six or eight sides to fire from. Inside they smelled damp and musty, some flooded. For many years after the war one was on the beach at Happisburgh, having fallen down when some of the cliff collapsed.

    It is probably still there. On an occasion Dad took me in his car along the road at Flixton towards Bungay. On a previous occasion there had been dozens of tanks hidden in the trees.

    On this second occasion the tanks had gone but there were some wooden structures left and hanging in one was an Army shut knife a treasure I had for some time. On occasions we would go to visit my mother s parents at Heath Cottage, about a mile Norwich side of Holt. Bren gun carriers would practice on the heath.

    One I understand is buried in the bog there across the lows. Just down the road near the top of Edgefield Hill was a searchlight camp. I remember well how the searchlight beams would sweep the skies.

    Sometimes I was able to hear the boom boom of Ack Ack guns practising at Weybourne. A light aircraft would tow a target behind it. I have read that Churchill once inspected soldiers of the Cambridgeshire Regiment on the Heath.

    This was in 1940 when he was checking on our Coastal Defences. Similarly we would visit my father s parents at Thetford. I remember watching the trains from a back bedroom window.

    The house at Vicarage Road was fairly close to and overlooked the railway lines. More than once I saw a train towing thirty or more tanks on flat trucks, heading south towards London. On one occasion we went to Bury St.

    Edmunds to do some Christmas shopping. I had been given my Christmas present by my grandfather a new ten shilling note. In a bookshop I saw a book all about the British Army costing seven shillings.

    This I had to have although I knew the ten shillings was intended to go into savings. Was I in trouble over that ! It was here I first saw American Air Policemen on large Harley Davidson motor cycles patrolling the town.

    They were so smart with white helmets, hence the nick-name Snowdrops! In October, 1942 we moved to Methwold when Dad was promoted to Inspector. He was issued with a white steel helmet and a revolver.

    These I only saw once. I wasn t too happy about the move at the time as it meant a change of school and friends. I was much happier when I learned it was a mixed school!

    The school was at Downham Market which meant a twelve mile bus journey each way.. The bus would take us past the airfield at Bexwell, just outside Downham. Here we would see bombers, Stirlings and Lancasters being loaded up with bombs.

    Some of the planes we saw had been badly damaged by German fighter planes or anti aircraft fire over Germany during the night raids. Two airmen from this station were posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross. One was Flt Lt Aaron who was pilot on a bombing raid over Turin and was seriously wounded by flak from German guns but managed to get his plane home safely.

    He died soon after. The second V.C. Was in August, 1944 .

    Sq Ldr Bazagette was pilot of a Lancaster from 635 Squadron, a pathfinder squadron. He managed to mark their site rocket storage facilities in France. His aircraft was set on fire and on crash landing exploded.

    He and his crew were killed. During the war 170 aircraft were lost from this airfield we just did not realise the full significance of what we saw. At one time Mosquito fast light weight bombers made of wood also flew from there.

    Once the American Air Force came to the area, it was not long before some of the girls were coming to school with chewing gum, cigarettes, badges and some eventually married Americans, including two sisters. Because of the war the corridors round the inner quadrangles were lined with brick walls to give some protection against bomb blast. Fortunately they were never put to the test although when an air raid siren sounded we had to file into the corridors.

    School dinners were produced on economy lines but we never went hungry. There were rumours of horse meat and whale meat but we still consumed it with relish. For some meals we had luncheon meat.

    This was sliced so thinly to make it look more.! We had a lot of stewed apples and custard the apples coming from the Head Master s trees. He would also sell them to us for one penny each, also sweets.

    About this time British Restaurants were set up in various towns, the object being to provide basic meals cheaply. There was one in Downham Market, communal kitchens set up by the Ministry of Food as non-profit making. Meals were sold at a fixed price of 9d (just under 4p) and no meal of more than 3 courses for 5 shillings (25 p).

    I did sample these on two occasions when I had gone to play football on a Saturday and then had to wait some hours for the bus home. I believe it was on Thursday evenings, I and two friends would cycle to Mundford because the fish and chip shop there did fritters and chips on that night. This was a speciality.

    There was little fish available. I remember along roads through the forestry there would be signs warning about incendiary bombs and butterfly bombs. The butterfly or anti personnel bombs were first used in this country in 1940 against Ipswich.

    They were lethal within a radius of 33ft. Several would be dropped together by the Germans. We would also find bundles of aluminium foil in strips dropped by German planes.

    They were used as a counter measure against radar and first used by the Germans in 1943. We also used the same method, called Windows. About 1943 there were soldiers of the Eighth Army (the Desert Rats) camped in the area.

    I learned from some of them a few choice words in Italian. I also learned enough of their experiences in the desert to give a talk to my class at school. On the bus ride to school sometimes we passed Italian prisoners or war working in the fields and we would call out these choice words from the bus windows.

    Many of these Italians were billeted in a large house near the church in Stoke Ferry. They were easily recognised because they had round patches on their brown clothing. Some Italian prisoners of war were billeted at the army camp at Cranwich and some of our school girls living in Methwold would walk along the road towards Mundford to flirt with them.

    The Desert Rats were in the area training in readiness for D.Day on 6 th June, 1944. For a brief spell some Canadian troops were billeted in Methwold Drill Hall. Dad would have to break up fights at the pubs.

    On 26 th May, 1943 the King and Queen came to visit Methwold airfield and my father was present as he was responsible for civilian policing. He kept very quiet about it and I didn t know until after the war. At one time airmen of the Royal Dutch Naval Air Service were stationed at Methwold.

    Their uniform was a very smart dark blue. This was in 1943 and they flew B25 Mitchell light bombers I believe of the 320 (Netherlands) Squadron. The front of our house overlooked the flight path and I often watched the comings and goings from a spare bedroom window.

    It was on the 3 rd of May, 1943 when Squadron Leader Leonard Trent 1 (later awarded the V.C. and D.F.C.) flew out from Methwold with twelve Ventura aircraft of 487 Squadron, Royal New Zealand Air Force on a fateful raid. Their target was Amsterdam power station.

    I saw them go out and later only one return, the rest having been shot down. Since the war I have been able to read that S/Ldr Trent was one of those shot down and he and his navigator were held prisoners of war. He was involved in the Great Escape from Stalag Luft III when 220 R.A.F.

    Prisoners planned to escape via a tunnel. He managed to get through the tunnel but was found by the Germans nearby and surrendered. He remained a prisoner until the end of the war.

    There is now a Ventura Close in Methwold. Didlington Hall has some war-time memories for me. I and a couple of friends would cycle from Methwold and fish in the River Wissey off a road bridge.

    American airmen from Bodney would walk that way, I think this was about July, 1943. They were very generous, giving us sweets, chocolate cigarettes, also fishing line and hooks We would see our friends for a while and then no more. At that time it did not occur to us they may have been shot down or killed in their missions.

    On part of the estate was a watermill which breached the river. We used to swim in the mill-pond and were sometimes joined by Americans. One convinced me a quick way to have a suntan was to put vinegar onto my body.

    It did give me a tan but friends at school wouldn t sit near me because I smelled like a fish and chip shop, my mother wondered were the vinegar was going ! In December, 1943 I was given an autograph album as a birthday present which I started using straight away and I still have it. It contains entries not only from school friends but also servicemen.

    One is by a Group Captain Yarde who was commanding officer at Methwold. He took the salute of a parade through Methwold High Street for Salute the Soldier week on Sunday 14 th May 1944. My father wasn t very pleased that I was audacious enough to ask for it.

    It was during this savings campaign there was a drawing competition at Downham. I did a drawing of the badge of the King s Own Scottish Borderers and won first prize. I was presented with a fifteen shilling savings certificate in Downham Town Hall by Lady Ruth Fermoy who died in 1993 aged 85.

    Once I saw an RAF Meteorological balloon slowly come down to land in a field opposite the Cock public house corner. I told Dad and went with him and P.c. Albert S to hold it until RAF personnel arrived.

    Albert was my hero. He always had time for me when Dad was elsewhere. Once he showed me some copies of Mein Kampf (My Struggle) Hitler s story seized from a German sympathiser living in the Methwold fens.

    They were stored in one of the cells. It was in May, 1945 many Indian soldiers who had been captured by the Germans in the North African Desert Campaigns and held prisoners of war were flown back to England in Operation Exodus from Bari, Italy. In this operation altogether something like 72,500 ex P.O.W.s were flown back to England in 23 days.

    Lancaster bombers of 149 Squadron, Methwold, played their part in this. Many Indian soldiers were billeted in the area round Methwold and Northwold, in the camps which had been used by the Desert Rats before D Day. The Indians were fattened up before the long journey back to India.

    It is worth noting that of all the aircraft which flew from Methwold during the war 43 were lost by being shot down or crashing, of these 25 were Venturas, 6 Stirlings and 12 Lancasters. The Methwold Lancasters also took part in Operation Manna in which food supplies were dropped to starving civilians in Holland. The first flight in this operation was from Methwold on 29 th April and the plane named Bad Penny .

    The American Air Force did similar flights and named their operation Chowhound . The village sign now depicts an aircraft in flight over a ploughing scene and the church. There is a Roll of Honour in Methwold church, a page being turned each day.

    Sometimes on a Saturday afternoon I would cycle to one of the camps, either at Didlington or Lyndford. I had made many friends of different creeds and castes among the Indian soldiers and enjoyed the challenge of making myself understood. I drank pint mugs of tea, oddly with a pinch of salt.

    Sometimes I was given a chapatti with an egg stolen from the local farmer, or jam. I also went to the camp cinema and watched Indian films and learned a smattering of Urdu also how to write my name and address in Sanskrit. Cigarettes were plentiful albeit rather rough.

    One make, Victory, was like sawdust. We would often see a lady from Methwold who wore very bright red lipstick cycling out to the Indian camps on her old bike to offer some home comforts I expect! A British army officer, Leslie Ball, was billeted at the Hall and wrote a lovely book called Heron Lake.

    He wrote about the wildlife on the lake. We used to get to the lake from near the water-mill. One of the very early paintings I did from life was of the lake.

    The hall overlooked the lake and there was an open air swimming pool. On one occasion we went for a swim there but there was green algae on the surface. Nearer to the time of Operation Overlord D Day General Sir Miles Dempsey had his headquarters at the hall.

    He became commander of the 2 nd Army in Europe from 26 th January, 1944 to 8 th August, 1945. My memory of D Day Tuesday, 6 th June, 1944 was hearing the roar of very many bomber planes and looking up to see the sky full of American Fortresses and Liberators. On one occasion my father took me there or it could have been Lyndford Hall.

    I think it was to a courts-martial but as usual I wasn t told! I do remember having lunch in this very large hall sitting among American Air Force officers. As a constant reminder of the Desert Rats, what they did in the war and their presence in the Mundford area there is a Cromwell tank on a raised plinth beside the road from Brandon to Swaffham.

    Parts of the 7th Armoured Division, prior to D Day, were stationed at the camp at Cranwich. For some reason unknown to me my father had an invitation to go to their camp to see a show by a branch of ENSA (Entertainments National Services Association). He took me along and we sat on the front row.

    Many well-known entertainers visited camps of H.M. Forces. I have no idea who were in this particular show but we enjoyed it.

    As there were so many airfields in the area plane crashes were inevitable. As soon as we boys had heard of a crash we would be off on our bikes looking for souvenirs, parts of aircraft or live ammunition. We would pull out the steel ends to get at the thin strips of cordite.

    These we lay out in a line and set fire to them just for the fun of it. Once we went to a crash site where two American bombers had collided in mid-air, fell to the ground and both crews killed. We wanted to have a look but there was an American Air Force policeman on guard and he had a gun.

    He told us to clear off. We told him it was our country and we could do what we liked. He wasn t impressed and became threatening so we left in a hurry.

    We never gave a thought to the fact that a plane crash meant the loss of life and In the case of an American bomber as many as ten men. On the evening of V.J. Day victory in Japan I was staying with my parents in Thetford.

    There were celebrations near Castle Hill. I went there and found some of my Indian friends. They introduced me to an Indian V.C.

    His name was Singh. He gave me his autograph which I had on a scrap of paper for many years after. Unfortunately like many things with the passage of time it got lost as did many of my souvenirs like badges from different countries.

    I still have a small silk handkerchief also a large print of a painting of loads of cotton on carts in Northern India which were given to me by my Indian friends. Having left school in July, after a short holiday I started work at Barclays Bank at Brandon. There was still a heavy presence of both American and British army.

    Officers would come into the bank paying money into various accounts and one of the lady staff was in much demand for dates and some mornings would stagger into work after a particularly late night! These are my memories of World War Two when I was a schoolboy. I have added some information after research to explain some happenings but apart from these the rest are genuinely from my memories.

    Bas Kybird, 83 years Drayton, April, 2012 References ^ Leonard Trent (en.wikipedia.org)

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  • A talk by textile artist Polly Binns 2nd Feb 2016 The Norfolk Contemporary Craft Society is pleased to announce another lecture celebrating the Francis Cheetham Legacy A talk by textile artist Polly Binns Personal Perspectives 7pm on Tuesday 2 nd February 2016 At Norwich and Norfolk Community Arts Martineau Memorial Hall, 21 Colegate, Norwich NR3 1BN www.norcaarts.co.uk/contact-us.html 1 Tickets on the door 5 3 to NCCS Members and Friends A glass of wine or soft drink included www.norfolkcraft.co.uk 2 Textile artist, Polly Binns, considers why and how we become the artists we are.

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  • A WEEKEND OF VARIED EMOTIONS A WEEKEND OF VARIED EMOTIONS Last weekend was a mixture of frustration (to put it mildly in one case), disappointment, encouragement and excitement for our teams as summarised below. Ladies 1sts . The team laboured to a deserved 4-1 win at a cold Weybread over bottom-placed Ipswich.

    Emma Lee-Smith put them ahead in the first half only for a lively Ipswich to equalise after the break. The game was then transformed when seemingly out of the blue Abby Gooderham fired home one of the goals of the season with a superb reverse stick shot from the edge of the circle. Susan Wessels then converted a penalty corner before Abby set up Susan for a simple tap-in after another piece of individual skill.

    With time running out Abby seemed destined for a deserved second goal only for the umpire to blow for the end of the game with the ball about to roll into the unguarded goal! The team remains in fourth place and this coming Saturday is away to Maidenhead (1.30). Ladies 2nds.

    There was further frustration for the team when they conceded two early goals away to St Albans 2nds following decisions which on another day might have gone in their favour. But they went on to battle hard combined with some excellent hockey and they got a deserved late goal when Kara Kilbourn deflected home at a penalty corner. With this 2-1 defeat the team need to win at least two of their last three games (starting at home this Saturday against Maidstone (2.00) to have any chance of avoiding relegation.

    Ladies 3rds . After their 6-0 away win over Pelicans 2nds (with goals by Sarah Legg 2, Millie Preece 2, Katie Ogden and Mia King) and the draw for the 4ths the team now lead their league by three points from the 4ths who have a game in hand. Katie Woollatt was MOTM.

    This Saturday Lucy Field and her team are at home after four successive away games when they host third-placed UEA 2nds (3.30). Ladies 4ths . After five wins on the trot the team had to be content with a 1-1 home draw against a gritty Norwich City 2nds.

    Laura Tibbenham put them ahead in the first half after considerable City pressure and City hit back with a scrappy goal after the break for a deserved equaliser. Despite these two dropped points Treacle Griffin and her team can still win the league but they have a tricky away game with fourth placed Norwich Dragons 3rds (11.30) this Saturday who drew last weekend after coming up against the resolute defence of lowly Evergreens. END OF SEASON SENIOR AWARDS EVENING including Buffet & Disco SATURDAY 19 MARCH, APOLLO CLUB, HARLESTON Arrive 7.30pm Awards 8.00pm Taxis 12.00am.

    Dress: Smart Tickets (which must be purchased in advance) are 20.00 and are available from clubhouse bar or from Jackie and Kevin Ridley 01379 854697 or 07815 199803. Please come to help make this evening both enjoyable and successful. Ladies 5ths .

    Two weeks ago in a re-arranged away game the team went down 6-3 to Watton 2nds but they were determined there would be no repeat at home and they ran out comfortable 4-0 winners. Imi Meynell-Anderson and Alice Evans-Hendrick put them 2-0 up at half time and skipper Jose Tibbenham made the game save with a couple later in the game. Fourth place is still attainable by the team but they will need to keep winning including at home to UEA 3rds on Saturday (10.15).

    Ladies 6ths . It was good to see the team earn a deserved point at home in a 2-2 draw with Evergreens 2nds. Ellie Fawkner gave them a first half lead and after Evergreens fought back to take the lead Ellie popped up with the equaliser with five minutes to go in an end to end match.

    This Saturday they are away to Norwich Dragons 6ths (3.15). Ladies 7ths . With a scheduled 5.30 start away to Norwich City 7ths the team knew they were in for a late finish.

    In the event with a delayed start they eventually came off the pitch at 7.20! After starting with ten players they lost Jane Collins through injury. Nevertheless they put up in a strong performance eventually losing 3-0.

    This week they are at home to Pelicans 3rds (12.15). Girls Development . Manager Sandra Elliner was obliged to select a very young side to play Pelicans with several players unavailable as they were playing the next day and with four playing for the 6ths.

    After a good game Pelicans came out on top winning 2-0. This Saturday the team is away to Yarmouth (10.00) whom they beat 5-0 in the middle of December. Men s 1sts.

    They just had to win their home match on Sunday with Teddington to keep alive their very slim national league survival hopes but it wasn t to be sadly as they went down 5-3. Myles King (with his first national league goal) and Ben Wright (with a penalty stroke conversion) had given the team the boost of a two-goal lead. Teddington hit back just before the interval and the game was transformed early in the second half with Teddington scoring three times in four minutes.

    Myles then scored again to give Magpies some hope but seeking an equaliser Magpies were caught on the break and the visitors, for whom it was good see out-on-loan Carl Sitch playing against his brother Leigh, scored again to win 5-3. This Sunday the team play their last home game of the season when they host Cambridge City at the changed time of 12 noon. Men s 2nds .

    Skipper Lawrence Baynes and his team were looking to build on their fine away win over Spalding when they took on fellow-strugglers Cambridge Univ 2nds at Weybread. It was soon clear they were in for a tough game and it was good to see Sam Moore and Richard Ling playing for Magpies for whom Thomas Ridley was in sparkling form. After a keen struggle the game seemed to be heading for a goalless draw but the students struck with five minutes to go.

    This spurred Magpies on even further and Thomas gave them a deserved equaliser. While now off the bottom of the league Magpies will need to win at least two of their last four games to avoid relegation starting hopefully away to Felixstowe on Saturday (2.00). Men s 3rds .

    The team knew they were in for a tough game against league leaders IES 2nds despite beating them at home 5-1 earlier in the season. They conceded two sloppy goals early in the game and after getting to half time without further damage they let in another soon after.

    3-0 down soon came 4-0 but third-placed Magpies hit back with late goals by Jake Sewell and skipper Matt Brand to lose 4-2. With three games left promotion is still a possibility for Magpies but they will need to beat Norwich City 4ths at home on Saturday (1.45) to have a realistic chance.

    END OF SEASON SENIOR AWARDS EVENING including Buffet & Disco please see above Men s 4ths . After their fine win over IES 3rds the previous week the team took a big step to avoiding relegation when they beat IES 4ths 1-0 away to move up to 5th place in their league. Their goal came in the last minute through Ali Williamson with his first for the club in thirteen years after he beat three players in the circle.

    What a goal! But they are still not completely safe although a win on Saturday at home to North Norfolk 2nds (12.00) would do the trick. Men s 5ths .

    They were up against league leaders Bury St Edmunds 4ths in the last game at Weybread by which time I have to confess I had sought the warmth of the clubhouse and with it an excellent meal thanks to the Ladies 1sts. Andy Caston twice brought his team level before Bury pulled away to lead 5-2. Lewis Belsey then scored to make the final score a respectable 5-3.

    On Saturday they are away to Thetford Town (2.30) who like them are in mid-table comfort. Men s 6ths . Eric Davy s team continues to amaze!

    Their 2-1 home win over Norwich Dragons 5ths was their seventh in their last eight games with the other ending in a draw. They were a goal down at half time before Eric got the equaliser (although this was incorrectly challenged in the clubhouse by jealous team-mates!) after Jon Wells had created the penalty corner. With seven minutes to go and with an appreciative roar from the spectators Richard Chopper Allcock fired home the winner after a shot from Roger Kent had come back off a post.

    The prospect of promotion for the team remains a concern (!) but they have three demanding games remaining including away to Norfolk Nomads on Saturday (2.30). Boys Development . While father Andy was scoring a brace for the 5ths sons Tom and Jake Caston were scoring the four goals by which the Dev team won 4-0 away to Pelicans.

    Tom went one better than his father scoring three times while Jake had to be content with one. The team, which does not have a game this week, is now back on the top of their league two points ahead of Norwich Dragons (having played a game more) who they play away on Saturday week. Mixed.

    The team is at home to Norwich City on Sunday (2.00) in the 3rd round of the EH Trophy. U18 Girls. The team had the frustration of their mini-bus breaking down on their long trip to play Neston South Wirral on Sunday in the quarter-finals of the EH Plate.

    They then had the further frustration of losing 1-0 through a late goal. But to their credit they honoured the fixture. U16 Girls.

    Frustration mixed with bewilderment (and something stronger) must have be the emotions of the team and their supporters when after beating Cambridge City 2-1 and drawing 1-1 with hosts Leicester in the regional finals their game against Worcester was called off with ten minutes to go when they were leading 8-0 (with Abby Gooderham scoring a remarkable seven goals). The reason being that it says in the rules no team may lose by more than eight goals. This meant our team lost out to Leicester on goal difference of two after Leicester had surprisingly beaten a strong looking Cambridge City 8-0.

    U16 Boys. They had drama of their own at the regional finals in Canterbury drawing 3-3 with Teddington after being three up with six minutes to play. They then came from two down to draw 2-2 with Old Loughtonians before losing 3-1 to Canterbury.

    U14 Girls. They missed out on reaching their regional final when they lost 3-2 away to Norwich City. They recovered from 3-0 down with goals by Grace Collison and Georgie Cantrell and were pressing for the equaliser at the final whistle.

    U14 Boys. The team is through to the Midlands regional final on goal difference after Norwich Dragons beat Bury St Edmunds 3-1 on Sunday. U10/U12 Boys and Girls.

    Congratulations to our four A teams who have qualified for the East Finals to be held at Weybread over the weekend of Saturday/Sunday 16/17 April after their exciting successes in the Norfolk Championships at Pelicans HC on Sunday. The U10 Girls finished as champions while the other teams came second. This coming Sunday they will be joined by our B teams, who had their own event at Weybread, when they all compete in the Norwich Dragons Minis.

    Finally, a remarkable record at Weybread last Saturday when on the sand-based pitch there was a member of the Davy family playing in all four games for Magpies, namely Louise (10.45 for the 5ths), Katie (12.15 for the Development), father Eric (1.45 for the 6ths) and Louise and Julie and mother Marie (3.15 for the 6ths). Best of luck to all our teams this weekend. Please see the website for the full list of fixtures.

    With kind regards Mike Denham MDenham975@aol.com 1/3/16 www.magpies-hockey.co.uk web site hosted and managed by IceniPost.com 1 2 advert Barnham Broom Winter Golf Offers Related References ^ www.magpies-hockey.co.uk (www.magpies-hockey.co.uk) ^ IceniPost.com (icenipost.com)

  • A47 closed between King's Lynn and Swaffham after crash ... The A47 between King s Lynn and Swaffham has been closed following a serious collision at East Winch this morning (Wednesday).

    A car and a lorry were in collision near the Carpenter s Arms pub at around 11.15am.

    Emergency services are at the scene

  • A47 closure, A11 crash, train delay - Watton and Swaffham Times 08:09 11 December 2014 Tom Bristow 1 Crash on A11 at Chippenham. Photo: Forest Heath Police/Twitter Forest Heath Police/Twitter The A47 has been partially closed at Swaffham after a manhole collapsed this morning. One lane is closed King s Lynn bound near Swaffham while the damage is repaired.

    There were also minor delays on the A11 southbound this morning following a crash at Chippenham near Barton Mills at around 6.30am. Police said one person suffered minor injuries in the crash and one lane was temporarily closed to allow emergency services through. A breathalyser test showed the driver had some alcohol in their system but was not over the drink drive limit.

    There were also delays on the trains this morning of around 15 minutes on the Norwich to London line. Rail operator Greater Anglia said this was being caused by freight train congestion around Ipswich and an earlier broken down train. They are journeys that hundreds of thousands of people across East Angliia make every year as they commute to work, travel to meet loved ones or enjoy excursions out.

    Like many literary tales this one starts out with our heroes not quite knowing what is in store for them and ending up with the world at their feet. Thirty years of campaigning and traffic headaches have come to an end as the vision of a fully-dualled A11 is finally realised. A little-known part of Norfolk s First World War history which was to be lost through time has been safeguarded thanks to a determined community project.

    References ^ Tom Bristow (www.wattonandswaffhamtimes.co.uk)

  • A47 delays due to adnormal load 13 November 2013 Police would like to make the public aware of an abnormal load travelling through the county. On Thursday 14 November at around 9.30am a police escorted load will leave Great Yarmouth for North Pickenham Airfield near Swaffham and then will continue to Weston Longville Airfield. The load is a 50m long test rig for wind farm equipment.

    Delays are expected on the A47 between Great Yarmouth and Swaffham.

  • About one month to go for businesses to enter Spirit of Enterprise ... BUSINESSES have just over one month left to enter a prestigious annual awards scheme which aims to celebrate and raise the profile of successful businesses across the Great Yarmouth borough. The Spirit of Enterprise Awards 2015 is organised by enterpriseGY, Great Yarmouth Borough Council s business support service, and is a chance for top-performing businesses of all sizes, sectors and ages to step into the spotlight. Interest in the prestigious awards scheme has been growing since entries opened on Tuesday, June 23.

    Businesses have until 4pm on Friday, September 11 to put themselves forward in the various categories. It is free-of-charge to enter and finalists will be profiled in a supplement in the Great Yarmouth Mercury, with winners appearing in a further supplement. The winner of each category, plus the winner of the overall 2015 Business of the Year Award, will be revealed at a glittering awards ceremony, at the Town Hall on Friday, November 20.

    For the first time, applications can be filled out and submitted online at www.soea.co.uk 1 via a new online entry system, which makes it quicker and easier for businesses to enter multiple categories. There is also a new category for 2015, Great Family Owned Business. Each award is backed by a local organisation.

    Sponsors choose the winner in their category from three finalists shortlisted by a local independent panel or the category sponsor themselves, and also benefit from publicity at the ceremony and in the newspaper supplements. The main sponsor is local chartered accountants, Lovewell Blake LLP, which will choose the 2015 Business of the Year from the winners of the other categories. The categories are: Business of the Year sponsored by Lovewell Blake LLP Great Manufacturing/Engineering Business sponsored by Great Yarmouth College Great New Business sponsored by Itron Great International Growth sponsored by GYB Services Ltd Great Investment in Young People sponsored by Subsea Technology and Rentals Great Business Growth sponsored by the Great Yarmouth Mercury Great Business Idea sponsor TBC Great Community Contribution sponsor TBC Great Customer Service sponsored by Greater Yarmouth Tourism and Business Improvement Area Great Family Owned Business Birketts Cllr Graham Plant, the council leader, said: The awards scheme, now in its eighth year, has grown in stature year-on-year and is a fantastic showcase of businesses of all sizes, sectors and ages from across the borough, and of the strength of the local economy.

    There is now just over one month left for the many successful businesses across the borough to take up this fantastic opportunity to showcase themselves on a very public platform. Several entries have already come in and the new online application system makes it quicker and easier than ever before to enter multiple categories. We always have great feedback from both the entrants and sponsors, with last year s awards ceremony considered the best yet.

    So if you think you could win a category or even be crowned the 2015 Business of the Year, make sure you submit the entry form by Friday, September 11. Businesses and potential sponsors seeking more information can visit www.soea.co.uk 2 or call Sally Pearson, enterpriseGY programme development officer, on 01493 846632. Notes: The Spirit of Enterprise Awards is the centrepiece of a two-year programme of enhanced activities by enterpriseGY, supported by the Coastal Communities Fund, which aims to create and safeguard more than 260 jobs, address seasonality and raise the perception of Great Yarmouth to that of the Enterprise Town for Business Growth and Job Creation .

    enterpriseGY, based in the Novus Centre, at The Conge, Great Yarmouth, is a joint borough council- and CCF-funded programme for businesses in Great Yarmouth offering business support, business advice and training for start-up businesses and existing businesses. The Coastal Communities Fund (CCF) aims to encourage the economic development of UK coastal communities by awarding funding to create sustainable economic growth and jobs. Since the start of the CCF in 2012, grants have been awarded to 145 organisations across the UK to the value of 71million.

    This funding is forecast to deliver 9,184 jobs and help attract around 115million of additional funds to coastal areas.

    The Big Lottery Fund is delivering the CCF on behalf of UK Government and the Devolved Administrations in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

    advert Monarch Catering Services, Norfolk, Suffolk Related References ^ www.soea.co.uk (www.soea.co.uk) ^ www.soea.co.uk (www.soea.co.uk)

  • absolute body conditioningABSOLUTE BODY CONDITIONING | PERSONAL TRAINING | SPECIALISING IN VIIT & HIIT FITNESS Jul 27, 2015 Personal Training in your home to achieve your goals Introductory offers available including body composition analysis & initial testing Tailor made programs to suit you 1-2-1 or small group sessions For more information or to book an appointment: call Lisa on 07787 279597 Visit my Facebook Page 1 at Absolute Body Conditioning ABC H.I.I.T. (High Intensity Interval Training) KS Xtreme (H.I.I.T) Armageddon Training (Variable Intensity Interval Training) Circuit Training (V.I.I.T) Kettlebell Training (V.I.I.T) Beccles Sports Centre Monday Evenings 6.15-6.45 pm The Dojo at the old Chaucer Club, Bungay Wednesday Evenings 6.30-7.00 pm Friday Mornings 9.30-10.00 am Related About the author Nigel Bedingfield is the editor of Iceni Post and Director of imajaz limited This site uses cookies, would you like to continue?Yes I'm happy to proceed πŸ™‚ More info please? 2 References ^ Facebook Page (www.facebook.com) ^ More info please? (icenipost.com)
  • Access to Music Norwich somewhereto workshops 22 October 2014 SYCO Entertainment in association with somewhereto_ invite local young people in Norwich to showcase their skills and be mentored by professional talent scouts somewhereto_ are co-hosting tailored workshops and open auditions to help develop artist evolution somewhereto.com 1 - 22 October 2014 | 4pm 9pm Access to Music Norwich, EPIC, 114 Magdalen Street, Norwich, NR3 1JD - Working in association with regional delivery partners Creative Arts East, somewhereto_ will be co-hosting an evening of workshops and open auditions with SYCO Entertainment (Simons Cowell s TV and Music Production Company) , giving local undiscovered talent the opportunity to meet with industry professionals. somewhereto_ is a UK wide youth project delivered by Livity and funded by a 7m grant from the Big Lottery Fund to support its nationwide expansion to 2016. Helping 16-25 year olds access free spaces in their communities, to launch and develop creative and enterprising projects.

    Open to 16-25 year olds , on Wednesday 22 October 2014 from 4pm 9pm somewhereto_ in association with SYCO Entertainment will co-host workshops and auditions at Access to Music Norwich to help young people develop key industry skills. Top Talent Producers at SYCO Entertainment, are donating their free time and expertise to somewhereto_ as industry mentors (recently hosting workshops during summer of somewhereto_), offering advice and insight to young people pursuing careers in entertainment. Whether their talent is singing, dancing, playing instruments or juggling objects, the day is designed to help young people establish best practices, boost confidence and develop artist evolution.

    Local young people are invited to submit interest at elly@somewhereto.org 2 where they can sign up to the workshop and be given the incredible chance to perform in front of professional talent scouts.

    Speaking ahead of the event, Elly Wilson, regional delivery partner for somewhereto_ in the East of England, says: This is such an exciting event to take place locally in Norwich, giving young people from the Eastern Region a great opportunity to showcase their talents and gain confidence in the field they love. - www.creativeartseast.co.uk 3 MIKE DANIELS Trailer Sales 01986 893025 Related References ^ somewhereto.com (somewhereto.com) ^ elly@somewhereto.org (icenipost.com) ^ www.creativeartseast.co.uk (www.creativeartseast.co.uk)

  • Active Norfolk: Get in Gear The Tour of Britain is ComingActive Norfolk: Get in Gear The Tour of Britain is Coming Aug 13, 2015 Active Norfolk The Tour of Britain is Coming! & Other News Please click on preview image below to view newsletter in a new window: iceni post advert AAlways wanted to learn a martial art?

    Then Come and Try Taekwon-do at Beccles Taekwon-do Club!

    It s never too late, we teach both the young and the not so young Related About the author Nigel Bedingfield is the editor of Iceni Post and Director of imajaz limited This site uses cookies, would you like to continue?Yes I'm happy to proceed πŸ™‚ More info please? 1 References ^ More info please? (icenipost.com)

  • Age UK Norwich Art Exhibition at largest Norfolk Hospital Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals will be featuring a new art exhibition from Age UK Norwich which aims to capture older people s history in words, pictures and sounds. The exhibition will be on show along the hospital street Level 1, and will feature important moments to promote a better sense of understanding and care. The exhibition showcases five Life Stories created by students from the Jane Austen College who have worked closely with local older people to produce Life Story Scrapbooks.

    BBC Voices trained the pupils in recording skills and alongside the photography and scrapbook display, the public will be able to hear the older people s memories come to life. Emma Jarvis, Hospital Arts Co-ordinator, said: People visit hospitals for a variety of reasons so we provide a wide variety of art for patients, visitors and staff. We are really pleased to be showcasing the work by Age UK Norwich especially as Age UK is of service to both the visitors and patients of our older people s medicines wards and the art is a way of displaying both services available and information.

    Age UK Norwich Chief Executive Susan Ringwood said: The life stories work we do is an important project helping to prevent older people from becoming invisible. If the time comes when their abilities do become impaired, there is a record of who this person once was, what they have done, where they have been. This intergenerational project lasted three months and is just one example of the work Age UK Norwich carries out in the city to help tackle loneliness and social isolation.

    The exhibition is open until the end of April 2016.

    Notes: The Hospital Arts Project at NNUH works on diverse projects with the community, interior design, site specific arts, performances, workshops, exhibitions, events and gardens Is hospital arts charitably funded as a whole? Many of its projects project are funded by grants from organisations and charitable donations.

    For more information visit www.nnuh.nhs.uk/arts 1 www.nnuh.nhs.uk 2 advert Monarch Catering Services, Norfolk, Suffolk Related References ^ www.nnuh.nhs.uk/arts (track.vuelio.uk.com) ^ www.nnuh.nhs.uk (www.nnuh.nhs.uk)

  • Alice's Adventure in Wonderland Ashill Community Centre this ... at Ashill Community Centre on Sunday 20th December 2015 Award winning theatre company Box Tale Soup bring their own special flavour to Ashill Community Centre on Sunday 20 th December , supported by the arts and community development charity Creative Arts East. Alice s Adventures in Wonderland is a magical adventure featuring a cast of just two human performers, a dozen beautifully handmade puppets, and a set that unfolds from a vintage trunk. Join Alice on her journey down the rabbit hole and meet the well-loved characters of her storybook world.

    The show is suitable for ages 10+ and families.

    You can see Alice s Adventures in Wonderland at 2.00pm at Ashill Community Centre on Sunday 20 th December These events are organised in partnership with Creative Arts East with funding by Norfolk County Council and Breckland Council.

    For further information on this and other Creative Arts East events please go to: www.creativeartseast.co.uk/live/whatson.asp or contact Karen Kidman on 01953 713390 or karen@creativeartseast.co.uk 1 2 advert ASD Consultants, Engineering, Architecture, Surveying Related References ^ www.creativeartseast.co.uk/live/whatson.asp (www.creativeartseast.co.uk) ^ karen@creativeartseast.co.uk (icenipost.com)

  • all about me: Norfolk headless bodyThe Norfolk headless body case relates to a woman, believed murdered, who died around the first or second week of August 1974. Her decapitated body was found near Swaffham, Norfolk, England, on 27 August 1974. Her head has never been found.

    The woman has never been identified; however, one theory that police are working on is that she was a prostitute known as "The Duchess" who worked the Great Yarmouth docks under that name and who disappeared in the summer of 1974. Origins: After the woman's remains were exhumed in 2008, samples of her toenails, hair and thigh bone were subjected to DNA and isotopic analysis. A full DNA profile was obtained but there was no match with any database, but the independent isotopic analyses carried out by professor Wolfram Meier-Augenstein and another scientist, which looks at the traces left in the body from the water consumed during a person's lifetime, both indicated that she was probably from the central Europe area including Denmark, Germany, Austria and Northern Italy.

    Family: From a second post-mortem examination of the woman, Norfolk police learned that her pelvic girdle had widened which happens during pregnancy to allow a woman to give birth, indicating that she probably had at least one child. Death: The badly decomposed body of the woman was found on 27 August 1974 by Andrew Head (19), a tractor driver, who was out walking when he found the body on land belonging to Sir Peter Roberts. Head later recalled: "I lifted one corner of the cover over the body and that was enough I could see what it was.

    I went home and phoned the police." The body was near a track leading to Brake Hill Farm, Brandon Road, near Swaffham, Norfolk. Combine harvesters were used to clear fields to allow them to be searched. Police believe the woman died in the first or second week of August 1974.

    She was estimated to be aged between 23 and 35 and 5ft to 5ft 2in tall. Her hands and legs were bound to her body and she was wearing only a pink 1969 Marks & Spencer nightdress. She had been decapitated.

    Her head has never been found. Her body was wrapped in a plastic sheet embossed with the words National Cash Registers. A collector in the United States identified the cover as being from a payroll machine and the exact model but the enquiry also established that thousands of the machines would have been made with many exported.

    With her body was a length of rope that was unusual in being made of four strands, rather than the more usual three or five strands. An expert told police that the composition of the rope "suggests it was made for use with agricultural machinery". Police traced the place of manufacture of the rope to Dundee in Scotland but the firms that made that type of rope have since ceased trading.

    The first murder enquiry into the death ran from 1974 to 1975 during which time police spoke to 15,000 people and took 700 statements. They completed 6,750 house to house questionnaires. In 2008, Norfolk Police exhumed the woman's body under Operation Monton and took a DNA sample but were unable to identify the woman.

    They established that she was right-handed, had probably given birth, had consumed water found in Scotland and that fish and crabs formed an important part of her diet. They have issued several appeals for information. In 2008, the case was featured on the BBC's Crimewatch programme.

    In 2011, police made another appeal and identified 540 missing women as a result of fresh enquiries. In 2016, the case featured on television again and twice in the online version of BBC News. "The Duchess": Following a call from a former police officer, after the case featured on Crimewatch in 2008, Norfolk police are examining a theory that the woman is "The Duchess", a prostitute who lived in Great Yarmouth docks and who disappeared in the summer of 1974 leaving all her possessions behind. "The Duchess" is believed to have arrived in the port town on the Esbjerg Ferry from Denmark. Her clients were lorry drivers who travelled between Esbjerg and Yarmouth using the ferry and she also sometimes accompanied drivers on deliveries in England.

    She was 23 35 years old and 5 feet 2 inches tall.

    In 1973 74 she lived for four or five months in the dockers' hut at the Ocean terminal.

    She also spent time in custody but the records relating to that time have been destroyed and the police do not know the woman's real name, nor can they be sure that the dead woman is indeed "The Duchess".

  • Alliance cricketers celebrate another summer of success Premier division champions Fakenham with Emma Conway from Dipple and Conway and John Tythcott, vice-chairman of the Norfolk Cricket Alliance. Picture Credit Newsmakers PR The big hitters of club cricket celebrated a season to remember when the Dipple & Conway Opticians Norfolk Cricket Alliance handed out its 2015 awards. Honours were spread right across the county with Fakenham taking pride of place during the awards night at Wensum Valley Hotel and Country Club after their exciting young team, led by Australian Keegan Monahan-Fairlie, won the Premier Division for the first time since 2011.

    Fakenham s subsequent frustration at missing out on promotion to the East Anglian Premier League, when they lost in the play-off semi-finals, was softened when they were named as Club of the Year. Among the individuals honoured was Vauxhall Mallards veteran Carl Amos, who at 42 continued to show the quality that has made him a legend of Norfolk cricket by finishing as the league s leading run scorer with a total of 1074. The bowling honours were shared by Norwich s Simon Key, whose 38 wickets helped his team to the Division Two title, and Marcus Bishop of Lowestoft, while Andy Dale took the wicket-keeping award with 30 dismissals for Swaffham.

    Neil McDonald, Dipple & Conway s Group Practice Manager, said the second year of sponsorship had been another fulfilling one, adding: It has been exciting to be involved in a competition which reflects all the positive things about sport in Norfolk. The quality of the cricket has been exceptional and the spirit even more so, often with different generations of the same families playing side by side. Company director Matthew Conway added: We are a family-run, community-orientated business, about to celebrate our centenary in 2016, so it was fitting to be supporting a league which represents not only tradition but friendly competition played out in the heart of the county s communities.

    Alliance chairman Peter Thomas, who helped present the trophies with Matthew Conway, Emma Conway and Neil McDonald, said: There s no doubt that the input of Dipple & Conway has made a big difference to the competition over the past two years with the introduction of the player of the month awards further adding to the level of interest. He added: We also pride ourselves on our youth section which is getting youngsters involved in cricket, gaining confidence and even playing in adult teams, which is good for the future of the sport. On the Club of the Year award to Fakenham, he added: They were good both off and on the field.

    It was just disappointing that they couldn t go on to get the reward they really deserved by getting in the EAPL. But they are a young team and I think with another year of experience they can only get better. The awards evening was compered by Anglia Television presenter and keen cricketer Jonathan Wills.

    Division One winners Garboldisham with Matthew Conway, from Dipple and Conway, and John Tythcott, vice-chairman of the Norfolk Cricket Alliance. Picture Credit Newsmakers PR Division Two winners Norwich A with Matthew Conway, from Dipple and Conway, and John Tythcott, vice-chairman of the Norfolk Cricket Alliance. Picture Credit Newsmakers PR Division Three winners Vauxhall Mallards A with Matthew Conway, from Dipple and Conway, and John Tythcott, vice-chairman of the Norfolk Cricket Alliance.

    Picture Credit Newsmakers PR Division Four winners Winterton with Emma Conway, from Dipple and Conway, and John Tythcott, vice-chairman of the Norfolk Cricket Alliance. Picture Credit Newsmakers PR Division Five winners Martham with Matthew Conway, from Dipple and Conway, and John Tythcott, vice-chairman of the Norfolk Cricket Alliance. Picture Credit Newsmakers PR Division Six winners Bircham with Emma Conway, from Dipple and Conway, and John Tythcott, vice-chairman of the Norfolk Cricket Alliance.

    Picture Credit Newsmakers PR Dipple & Conway Opticians Norfolk Cricket Alliance Award Winners: Premier Division Winners Fakenham Runner-Up -Sprowston Division One Winners Garboldisham Runner-Up North Runcton Division Two Winners Norwich A Runner-Up Thetford Division Three Winners Vauxhall Mallards A Runner-Up Brooke A Division Four Winners Winterton Runner-Up Mundford Division Five Winners Martham Runner-Up Hethersett & Tas Valley A Division Six Winners Bircham Runner-Up Bradenham A Junior Competitions Under-9s - John Dewing Trophy Winners Brooke Runner-Up Horsford Under-11s - Terry Moore Trophy Winners Vauxhall Mallards Runner-Up Southwold Under-13s - Allan Bridgewater Trophy Winners Acle Runner-Up Cromer Under-15s - Andy Seeley Trophy Winners Swardeston CEYMS Runner-Up Acle Merit awards Leading run scorer Carl Amos (Vauxhall Mallards) Leading wicket-takers Marcus Bishop (Lowestoft) and Simon Key (Norwich).

    Leading wicketkeeper Andy Dale (Swaffham) Dipple & Conway Players of the Month May Jasper Payne (Swaffham) June Robin Yates (Mundford) July Harrison Futter (Fakenham) August Ben Coote (North Runcton).

    Club of the Year Fakenham

  • An Audience with Lesley Garrett, AUDEN THEATRE Holt At the AUDEN THEATRE Gresham s School Holt Sunday November 22 nd 7.30pm All Seats 25 Box Office Tel 01263-713444 www.greshams.com/Auden-Theatre 1 Join Britain s most popular soprano for a delightful evening of song, reminiscences and chat. Her behind-the-scenes stories and anecdotes will give audiences a unique insight into her life on the stage As well as performing with the English and Welsh National Operas, Lesley has recently starred in Carousel and The Sound of Music and appeared on television shows including Strictly Come Dancing and Loose Women. She has also performed with artists as diverse as Michael Ball, Renee Fleming, Andrea Bocelli, Bryn Terfel and Lily Savage.

    A natural effervescent and powerhouse voice Financial Times www.lesleygarrett.co.uk 2 Related References ^ www.greshams.com/Auden-Theatre (www.greshams.com) ^ www.lesleygarrett.co.uk (www.lesleygarrett.co.uk)

  • An end to waste dumping is on the agenda for Councillors An end to dumping residents waste in landfill in Norfolk is among the topics to be discussed by members of the Environment, Development and Transport (EDT) Committee when they meet Friday 20 November. Councillors are being asked to decide whether to award contracts to waste management companies, for four years-worth of services to deal with 160,000 tonnes of residents residual waste each year. If they agree, instead of going to landfill in Norfolk the waste would be sent to established, local waste management facilities in Costessey, Rackheath and Wisbech, where metals will be removed for recycling before it s processed into a fuel and exported to the Netherlands and Germany and turned into energy in Combined Heat and Power plants.

    If approved, the new contracts, worth a total of 68 million over four years would save the council 2 million a year on its current waste management costs and start in April 2016. Chairman of the committee, Toby Coke said: An end to using landfill in Norfolk has been a long held ambition for our county, so if Councillors decide to give these contracts the green light, it will mark a big step forward in the way we deal with our waste. These contracts also represent the first stage in delivering our new waste management strategy over the medium term, and will give us peace of mind that we have good arrangements in place for dealing with our waste until 2020.

    If approved, they would see us using waste much better than ever before by generating useful resources from it like metals for recycling and power and significantly reducing our waste management carbon footprint, equivalent of taking more than 30,000 cars off the road in Norfolk, over current landfill arrangements, instead of letting it meaninglessly rot away in the ground. They would use spare capacity at waste treatment facilities that are already up and running, and using locally based companies, and their workforces, as part of the process. And of course, they ll save us 2m a year, helping to plug the huge funding gap this authority needs to make in these difficult times.

    We still need to pin down our long term approach to dealing with residual waste from 2020 onwards. These contracts will give us breathing space to study new technologies that are coming onto the market and to see if they can be used here in the future. We have commissioned due diligence to be carried out on these and we are asking waste companies to come forward with sustainable solutions, which we ll be consulting on in the early part of next year.

    But, side by side with this, it s really important that we do all we possibly can, to increase recycling and reduce our left over waste, to keep our waste management costs down in the future. Particularly because of the demographic growth predicted for Norfolk which will lead to more waste being generated here. We are working much harder together with all of Norfolk s waste authorities to generate more recycling by getting it out of our residual waste bins.

    The Norfolk Waste Partnership has been stepping up its recycling campaigns and we have set ourselves a target of helping residents reduce what s in our waste bins by 1kg a week per household. Committee members will also be considering recommendations about highway maintenance changes. In September, Councillors asked for a report to be provided about the county s rural grass cutting regime so they could review it with an aim to achieve cost savings.

    The new report recommends that the current approach, which involves a wholesale cut of grass verges along Norfolk s roads twice a year, is changed to two intermittent safety cuts, concentrating on bends and junctions to maintain visibility for road users. Every other year, the second cut would be replaced with a full cut of all verges, to supress weed and shrub growth. The report also recommends incorporating the maintenance of the County Council s 112 Roadside Nature Reserves into the proposed new regime.

    Together, the changes would save 84,000 a year and have additional biodiversity benefits for wildlife along the county s roads. Cllr Coke said: I know there are people passionately for and against these kind of changes. But my long-held view is that completely cutting the grass alongside Norfolk s 6,000 miles of roads is excessive and something we simply can t afford.

    The changes will also help nesting birds and give wildflowers a chance to seed. So I welcome this report which is full of common sense and hope my colleagues are minded to go ahead with the recommendations. Councillors are also to decide whether to approve a new scheme for parish and town councils to be able to pay for their local highway ranger teams to carry out more work in their communities.

    This would be for things like shallow pothole repairs on minor roads and sign cleaning works which are important to local residents, but which the County Council couldn t carry out because with current levels of funding, they would rank as a low priority on the highway defect register. The new scheme proposes that communities pay for a half day minimum visit, with a charge out cost for a two-person Ranger gang for half a day being 300 plus VAT which would include labour, transport, materials, fuel, temporary traffic management, insurance and supervision. Councillors will also consider the introduction of a new scheme to install roadmarkings for residents to help prevent obstructions to their driveways, particularly in hotspot areas around schools, for a 120 charge.

    The EDT Committee will meet at 10am Friday 20 November in the Edwards Room at County Hall.

    Members of the public are welcome to attend.

  • An evening with Rob Hopkins the Power of Just Doing Stuff talk at ... Last Thursday we made our way across to the Green Britain Centre at Swaffham to an event organized by East Anglian transition groups, in particular Downham & Villages in Transition and West Norfolk Permaculture - this was part of the Transition Thursday series of talks being given by Rob Hopkins, co founder of the Transition Network.

    1 2 3 The evening was well attended , with some 70 or so transitioners from groups around Norfolk and interested members of the public (including organic gardening celebrity Bob Flowerdew 4 ) and the Transition Free Press 5 . The Green Britain Centre kindly laid on some scrummy organic snacks and drinks. The event kicked off with introductions from Ben Margolis of West Norfolk Permaculture in familiar transition style, followed by some brief upates from some of the local transition groups including Kings Lynn and Downham & Villages.

    Most of the Norfolk groups have been running for a couple of years longer than us at PiNT 6 , but as with Peterborough s Green Back Yard 7 many groups were similarly based around local community growing projects of various types. These have gone from strength to strength, particularly in the case of Transition Norwich 8 which has a particularly vibrant scene in the surrounding area. Due to the large mostly rural area of Norfolk, attendees came from quite a wide area, from us in the west to the North Norfolk coast , east to Norwich and further south.

    The organizers had printed out a massive map of the area to put our names on to see where we were all from, which made interesting viewing by the end of the event! Our neighbours at Transition Kings Lynn have spent most of their time and energy recently in fighting the massive Cory Energy From Waste Incinerator that was due to have been built at Saddlebrow, near the large Palm Paper Factory 9 . However due to some hard campaigning work engaging successfully with the local community, this scheme has now been overturned, the council have seen sense (and several councillors replaced at the last election) and a new recycling scheme and waste disposal program is to be introduced that will see the majority of waste being properly recycled in a rather more environmentally friendly way (they are hoping for something like a 90% recycling rate that puts most other schemes to shame!) Of course that just leaves the similar PREL site nearby at Sutton Bridge to contend with but shows what can be achieved.

    Rob Hopkins then gave his talk on the Power of Just Doing Stuff how local action can change the world , which followed the theme of his new book. This was an interesting and empowering couple of hours about how it is possible to create a new kind of resilient, economic future , creating employment and wealth and wellbeing in local communities. It was about the positive changes that the transition movement has begun to achieve around the world through communities who decide to take a different approach to how they live and work instead of the current business as usual model.

    The transition movement has spread rapidly around the world, from the UK to North and South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Australasia with many different initiatives in response to the particular local situations. Interestingly, transition in those countries of the global south is evolving in a somewhat different way to that we are familiar with in the UK. It is based on the same principles, but with more emphasis on social justice , education and food security for local communities, challenging the status quo and development by growth strategies pushed NGO s and big government alternative development if you like.

    For the UK, Rob covered the trials and tribulations of various transition related projects from its Totnes roots to Transition Tooting s 10 ultimately successful struggles with the local council bureaucrats and excellent community energy projects in Brixton 11 , along with the various local currency schemes (complete with examples of both Bristol and Brixton pound notes now highly sought after by international coin collectors!) . He went on to look at initiatives in various countries around the world including Portugal, Brazill and Australia. One of the main thrusts in the UK is the REconomy project 12 which basically means getting the cash back into the local economy creating more resilient communities, local business and jobs to the benefit of the local community.

    Whereas the situation at the moment in most places is that the majority of the money spent locally is just siphoned off to swell the profits of some anonymous corporation elsewhere with little real wealth retained locally. For example, the majority of money spent in the UK on groceries an astounding 97% is split between just 8 large suppliers (ie Tesco, Asda, Sainsburys, Morrison etc) . A growing number of small projects are starting to counteract this, from local food co-operatives, bakers and greengrocers to small brewers and community energy companies.

    These are all individually small projects, locally owned and run, but taken together, they are empowering communities and starting to make a real difference, Rob ended the evening with a brief Q&A session followed by him signing copies of his new book. I now have a copy of this but can certainly recommend it to anyone interested in where transition is going today. It is a relatively small paperback (compared to the Transition Companion), some 160 pages and is now available to buy online from www.greenbooks.co.uk 13 and elsewhere or if you can get over to one, one of the Transition Thurday events ( the next one locally is on 18 July , organized by Transition Horncastle 14 , Lincolnshire.) You can see a short video of the Swaffham event on youtube 15 that Rob has just posted!

    Bob References ^ Green Britain (www.greenbritaincentre.co.uk) ^ Centre (www.greenbritaincentre.co.uk) ^ West Norfolk Permaculture - (norfolkpermaculture.wordpress.com) ^ Bob Flowerdew (www.bobflowerdew.co.uk) ^ Transition Free Press (transitionfreepress.org) ^ at PiNT (www.peterboroughintransition.org.uk) ^ Green Back Yard (www.thegreenbackyard.com) ^ Transition Norwich (transitionnorwichnews.blogspot.co.uk) ^ Palm Paper Factory (www.palmpaper.co.uk) ^ Transition Tooting s (transitiontowntooting.blogspot.co.uk) ^ Brixton (www.transitiontownbrixton.org) ^ REconomy project (peterboroughintransition.org.uk) ^ buy online from www.greenbooks.co.uk (www.greenbooks.co.uk ) ^ Transition Horncastle (transitionhorncastle.org) ^ short video of the Swaffham event on youtube (youtu.be)

  • And you explain that how?And you explain that how?

    Just imagine it.

    Haha!

  • Anglia Survey & Design ASD Consultants Engineering Architecture Surveying 16A Bridge Street, Halesworth, Suffolk. IP19 8AQ. Tel. (01986) 872250 Fax. (01986) 872228 Anglia Survey & Design (ASD) was formed in 1994 by partner Chris Ward with ASD Architecture Ltd.

    being created in 2006 by Chris and architect Vince Douglas. The ASD group consists of separate firms working together to offer a range of architectural, surveying and civil engineering services for a diverse range of clients from individual householders to large corporations, all based in Halesworth, Suffolk. Here at ASD we pride ourselves on being able to offer a friendly and personal service whilst maintaining the highest levels of technical expertise.

    All parts of the ASD group are free to act individually but our close partnering arrangement allows us to offer the efficiencies of an integrated service where required. www.asd-consultants.co.uk 1 ASD Engineering ASD Engineering is a trading name for the engineering arm of Anglia Survey & Design (ASD) based in Halesworth, Suffolk. ASD Engineering is able to offer a wide range of engineering services to suit any development, used individually or in combination.The engineering team are experienced in working closely to ensure that multi-disciplinary projects can be delivered efficiently.

    Whether you are looking for some initial advice on a project or need detailed engineering input, ASD can offer the solution you need to realise your aspirations. For more details click here: www.asd-engineering.co.uk 2 ASD Architecture ASD Architecture is an architectural practice that focuses on providing high quality design from inception through to completion with a particular focus on providing the right design solution for our clients needs and aspirations. ASD Architecture are experienced in a wide range of projects from single dwelling extensions to large scale residential development and from education to industry.

    For more details click here: www.asd-architecture.co.uk 3 ASD Surveys ASD Surveys is a trading name for the survey arm of Anglia Survey & Design (ASD). ASD surveys can be purchased individually or in conjunction with engineering and/or architectural services from ASD Engineering and ASD Architecture. Our strict confidentiality arrangements, however, allow us to operate independently of the other parts of the ASD group.

    Here at ASD surveys we appreciate the value of accurate base data as the foundation for subsequent design work and retain the personal level of service our domestic clients appreciate. Whatever your survey needs, ASD Surveys can provide you with a solution. For more details click here: www.asd-surveys.co.uk 4 ASD Consultants Engineering Architecture Surveying 16A Bridge Street, Halesworth, Suffolk.

    IP19 8AQ.

    Tel. (01986) 872250 Fax. (01986) 872228 Related References ^ www.asd-consultants.co.uk (www.asd-consultants.co.uk) ^ www.asd-engineering.co.uk (www.asd-engineering.co.uk) ^ www.asd-architecture.co.uk (www.asd-architecture.co.uk) ^ www.asd-surveys.co.uk (www.asd-surveys.co.uk)

  • Anglian Potters Selected Members' Exhibition 2015 Anglian Potters Selected Members Exhibition 2nd October 1st November 2015 21 selected members of the Anglian Potters Association will be exhibiting their work at the Ferini ART Gallery during October this year. It is a particularly auspicious time of year to have chosen as the gallery will be celebrating its fifteenth anniversary. Anglian Potters are delighted to be showing work in this beautiful space as they have not exhibited in Suffolk for several years.

    Clay is a most versatile and durable medium, lending itself to the creation of thrown domestic ware, hand-built vessels, sculpture, and even jewellery. The potters and sculptors showing their work in this exhibition represent many disciplines within ceramics, as well as revealing the rich diversity of skills and creativity that exist within Anglian Potters. From Rosemarie Cooke s charming wildlife sculptures, through Susan Cupitt s elegant and spare thrown vessels and Angela Mellor s delicate, transulscent porcelain, to the smoke-fired work of Juliet Gorman, this exhibition has something to appeal to all collectors of ceramics.

    The organisation is long-established and widely respected nationally. It was originally formed in in 1983 to represent all that is best in East Anglian ceramics. It has a thriving membership of over 400, which includes amateur and professional potters, students and supporters.

    Those who choose to apply for selected membership must submit a body of work for inspection by a panel of their peers.

    It is a rigorous process with equal attention being paid to form, process, skill and execution.

    Contact: Ferini ART Gallery Pakefield T 01502 562222 E info@feriniartgallery.co.uk Anglian Potters Selected Members secretary Anja Penger -Onyett E anja.penger@gmx.de 1 2 Notes: The exhibiting potters are as follows: Ray Auker, Deborah Baynes, Harvey Bradley, Murray Cheesman, Rosemarie Cooke, Susan Cupitt, Catherine D Arcy, Peter Deans, Moira Goodall, Juliet Gorman, Helen Martino, John Masterton, Angela Mellor, Stephen Murfitt, Anja Penger-Onyett, Christine Pike, Colin Saunders, Pam Schomberg, Usch Spettigue, Peter Warren Open 11am 4pm Fri/Sat/Sun 27-29 All Saints Road Pakefield Lowestoft Suffolk NR33 0JL info@feriniartgallery.co.uk 3 01502-562222 Related References ^ info@feriniartgallery.co.uk (icenipost.com) ^ anja.penger@gmx.de (icenipost.com) ^ info@feriniartgallery.co.uk (icenipost.com)

  • Anti-Austerity Campaigners March In Useful LocationAnti-Austerity Campaigners March In Useful Location | The Morning Gerald /gi;e.get(p,"html").done(function(u)var t=e("").append(u.replace(q,""));var v=t.find("div.blog-posts").children(".date-outer");v.find(".post-summary").each(function()var w,E,x,B,F,y,C,A,D="",z="";E=e(this).parent(".post-body");x=E.children("textarea").val();A=x.replace(/ /g,"").replace(/nr+/g," ");B=e(this).find("img");parens=e(this).parents(".post");y=parens.find(".post-header.meta").html();C=parens.find(".post-title.entry-title a").attr("href");titlex=parens.find(".post-title.entry-title a").text();F=B.attr("src");w=' ';if(F.indexOf("img.youtube.com")!=-1)w=' 'z=w+' '+titlex+' 1 '+y+" "+A.substring(0,i.summaryLength)+" ";e(this).html(z)});e("div.blog-posts").html(v);d=p;c();if(window._gaq)window._gaq.push("_trackPageview",i.olderPostsLink)if(window.gapi&&window.gapi.plusone&&window.gapi.plusone.go)window.gapi.plusone.go()if(window.disqus_shortname)r(window.disqus_shortname)if(window.FB&&window.FB.XFBML&&window.FB.XFBML.parse)window.FB.XFBML.parse()})}}})(jQuery)}; // Ajax JSON Recent Comment by MKR (function(a)a.RecentComments=function(c,b)var d=this;d.$el=a(c);d.init=function()d.options=a.extend(,a.RecentComments.defaultOptions,b);d.$el.addClass(d.options.loadingClass);a.get((d.options.blogURL===""?window.location.protocol+"//"+window.location.host:d.options.blogURL)+"/feeds/comments/default?alt=json-in-script&orderby=published",function(B)var f,e=B.feed.entry;if(e!==undefined)f=" ";ntotal=0;for(var z=0;z=d.options.numComments)breakvar h=ez;for(var v=0,A=h.link.length;v ':"");var s=p.lastIndexOf("/")+1,u=p.lastIndexOf("."),H=p.split("-").join(" ").substring(s,u)+"...";G=h.published.$t.substring(0,10);var r=G.substring(0,4),w=G.substring(5,7),D=G.substring(8,10),x=d.options.MonthNamesparseInt(w,10)-1,q=h.published.$t.substring(11,16),j=q.substring(0,2),y=q.substring(2,5);if(j 12)j=j-12f+=' ";n=("content" in h)?h.content.$t:("summary" in h)?h.summary.$t:"";var g=n.replace(/( ]+)> )/gi,"");if(g!==""&&g.length> d.options.characters)g=g.substring(0,d.options.characters);g+="..."elseg=gf+=(d.options.characters> 0?" 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jQuery(document).ready(function()jQuery(window).resize(function()jQuery(".list-tabwrap").removeAttr("style"))}); //]]> Anti-austerity campaigners have had a mass revelation about where they march it has been revealed. Speaking from outside the Tory party conference in Manchester, CND, Socialist Worker and Stop The War campaigner Ash Kennedy said 'We are marching in the wrong place!' 'The media never cover us and I get it now! Before I go on about location, I get that the mass printed signs handed out by alledged leftist organisations that seem to have an endless pot of cash to print glossy signage, have large central offices and exorbitant membership fees are hypocritical and slightly ridiculous.' 'But location!

    Thousands of people gathering in a city like Manchester or London. Well, big deal! That happens every saturday.

    It's boring. It's the same old shite. Over and over and over again.

    It's not news!' 'But if 50,000 people descended on Chipping Norton. Or Swaffham. Or any village in rural Tory country it would be the top story.

    Plus the local residents would be up in arms. They would be begging the Tories to get rid of these left wing people.' 'And we would of course go. When they change their policies.

    Until then, we mass in small villages.' 'Why has nobody though of this before?!?' Top 5 Anti-Austerity Campaigners March In Useful Location | The Morning Gerald /gi;e.get(p,"html").done(function(u)var t=e("").append(u.replace(q,""));var v=t.find("div.blog-posts").children(".date-outer");v.find(".post-summary").each(function()var w,E,x,B,F,y,C,A,D="",z="";E=e(this).parent(".post-body");x=E.children("textarea").val();A=x.replace(/ /g,"").replace(/nr+/g," ");B=e(this).find("img");parens=e(this).parents(".post");y=parens.find(".post-header.meta").html();C=parens.find(".post-title.entry-title a").attr("href");titlex=parens.find(".post-title.entry-title a").text();F=B.attr("src");w=' ';if(F.indexOf("img.youtube.com")!=-1)w=' 'z=w+' '+titlex+' 6 '+y+" "+A.substring(0,i.summaryLength)+" ";e(this).html(z)});e("div.blog-posts").html(v);d=p;c();if(window._gaq)window._gaq.push("_trackPageview",i.olderPostsLink)if(window.gapi&&window.gapi.plusone&&window.gapi.plusone.go)window.gapi.plusone.go()if(window.disqus_shortname)r(window.disqus_shortname)if(window.FB&&window.FB.XFBML&&window.FB.XFBML.parse)window.FB.XFBML.parse()})}}})(jQuery)}; // Ajax JSON Recent Comment by MKR (function(a)a.RecentComments=function(c,b)var d=this;d.$el=a(c);d.init=function()d.options=a.extend(,a.RecentComments.defaultOptions,b);d.$el.addClass(d.options.loadingClass);a.get((d.options.blogURL===""?window.location.protocol+"//"+window.location.host:d.options.blogURL)+"/feeds/comments/default?alt=json-in-script&orderby=published",function(B)var f,e=B.feed.entry;if(e!==undefined)f=" ";ntotal=0;for(var z=0;z=d.options.numComments)breakvar h=ez;for(var v=0,A=h.link.length;v ':"");var s=p.lastIndexOf("/")+1,u=p.lastIndexOf("."),H=p.split("-").join(" ").substring(s,u)+"...";G=h.published.$t.substring(0,10);var r=G.substring(0,4),w=G.substring(5,7),D=G.substring(8,10),x=d.options.MonthNamesparseInt(w,10)-1,q=h.published.$t.substring(11,16),j=q.substring(0,2),y=q.substring(2,5);if(j 12)j=j-12f+=' ";n=("content" in h)?h.content.$t:("summary" in h)?h.summary.$t:"";var g=n.replace(/( ]+)> )/gi,"");if(g!==""&&g.length> d.options.characters)g=g.substring(0,d.options.characters);g+="..."elseg=gf+=(d.options.characters> 0?" 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jQuery(document).ready(function()jQuery(window).resize(function()jQuery(".list-tabwrap").removeAttr("style"))}); //]]> Anti-austerity campaigners have had a mass revelation about where they march it has been revealed. Speaking from outside the Tory party conference in Manchester, CND, Socialist Worker and Stop The War campaigner Ash Kennedy said 'We are marching in the wrong place!' 'The media never cover us and I get it now! Before I go on about location, I get that the mass printed signs handed out by alledged leftist organisations that seem to have an endless pot of cash to print glossy signage, have large central offices and exorbitant membership fees are hypocritical and slightly ridiculous.' 'But location!

    Thousands of people gathering in a city like Manchester or London. Well, big deal! That happens every saturday.

    It's boring. It's the same old shite. Over and over and over again.

    It's not news!' 'But if 50,000 people descended on Chipping Norton. Or Swaffham. Or any village in rural Tory country it would be the top story.

    Plus the local residents would be up in arms. They would be begging the Tories to get rid of these left wing people.' 'And we would of course go. When they change their policies.

    Until then, we mass in small villages.' 'Why has nobody though of this before?!?' Top 10 References ^ '+titlex+' (www.themorninggerald.co.uk) ^ '+f+" (www.themorninggerald.co.uk) ^ prev (www.themorninggerald.co.uk) ^ next (www.themorninggerald.co.uk) ^ Scroll to Top (www.themorninggerald.co.uk) ^ '+titlex+' (www.themorninggerald.co.uk) ^ '+f+" (www.themorninggerald.co.uk) ^ prev (www.themorninggerald.co.uk) ^ next (www.themorninggerald.co.uk) ^ Scroll to Top (www.themorninggerald.co.uk)

  • Applecart Theatre - i Am Mark The bold London based storytelling company Applecart is touring the UK this autumn with their show i Am Mark a production that challenges the way we perceive religion and retells one of history s most famous tales. On Wednesday 15 th October they are taking over www.thegarage.org.uk 1 JESUS THE TERRORIST? MODERN MARK COURTS CONTROVERSY the pace of this production is unrelenting, leaving you both challenged and entertained at the finale something that is not easily achieved.

    Henry Austin, The London Economic AN EXPLOSIVE new production casting Jesus as a rebel leader, and featuring a terrorist strapping a bomb to himself, is set to challenge traditional church goers when it opens. Edgy theatre company Applecart claims the controversial modern day makeover of St Mark s Gospel: i am Mark will rid the story of its stuffy religious baggage. Instead they plan to show the Son of God as a revolutionary leader in the dramatic production that features a bomb-laden man counting down the seconds until he blows himself up.

    Artistic director Peter Moreton said: We re treating the story with huge respect but it has often been marginalised by the church. Jesus is subversive and political, which doesn t sit well with the dull and often narrow world of organized religion. He added that their production rid the tale of 2000 years of baggage using fresh and sometimes strong language.

    Storyteller Phil Summers added: For us a theatre in the heart of the city is a far better setting for a story of social unrest and revolution than an old echoing cathedral. This is why they have chosen Norwich! i Am Mark Using a combination of theatre, film, music and comedy they will tell the entire of Mark s Gospel for one night only at the Garage on the 15 th October 2014.

    The production was first performed at the Leicester Theatre in the West End and is touring throughout the UK this autumn during September and October.

    www.applecartlive.org 2 Iceni Post sponsors advert heyday creative event styling 3 we specialise in weddings as we believe they are one of the loveliest moments in life Related References ^ www.thegarage.org.uk (www.thegarage.org.uk) ^ www.applecartlive.org (www.applecartlive.org) ^ heyday creative event styling (www.heydayevents.co.uk)

  • April 28th - Charity Spring Walk and Open Gardens, down Down to the banks of the River Waveney Garden Open Sunday 28th April 2013 10am to 4pm The Olde Coach House, Brockdish, Diss, Norfolk IP21 4JY Garden open in aid of East Anglian Air Ambulance, The Big C, Prostate Cancer, Waveney Responders.

    Tombola, Cake stall, Craft stalls, Teas, Refreshments.

    Admission 2.00 Adults Sorry no dogs Cantor s Theatre School Related

  • April 28th - Charity Spring Walk and Open Gardens, down to the ...April 28th - Charity Spring Walk and Open Gardens, down to the banks of the River Waveney - Iceni Post News for Norfolk and Suffolk: News, Events, Art, Theatre, Wildlife, Business, Health and Wellbeing, Sport Apr 18, 2013 Down to the banks of the River Waveney Garden Open Sunday 28th April 2013 10am to 4pm The Olde Coach House, Brockdish, Diss, Norfolk IP21 4JY Garden open in aid of East Anglian Air Ambulance, The Big C, Prostate Cancer, Waveney Responders.

    Tombola, Cake stall, Craft stalls, Teas, Refreshments.

    Admission 2.00 Adults Sorry no dogs Cantor s Theatre School Related About the author Nigel Bedingfield is the editor of Iceni Post and Director of imajaz limited This site uses cookies, would you like to continue?Yes I'm happy to proceed πŸ™‚ More info please? 1 References ^ More info please? (icenipost.com)

  • β€œAre those guns real?” | UK Cop HumourAre those guns real?

    Here s your proof they aren t!

    And the dodgy six fingered ARV officers

  • Are Your Neighbors Annoying?

    You Might Be Lucky You can wrap your house in tin foil and shine a bright light to keep the ETs from invading, but don't expect to be the most popular kid on the block. Last week, we reported on Arthur Brown of Pennsylvania 1 , and his back porch efforts to ward off intergalactic intruders. But do you think he's the worst possible neighbor?

    In the world of weird news, that's never the case. Maybe those annoying neighbors you've got now aren't so bad. Consider living next door to these folks.

    1. The Interior Decorator If he wanted to be on "Trading Spaces" so badly, he should've just asked. Instead of hitting Ikea, a guy from Lakewood, Washington, decided to shop even closer to home -- in his neighbor's house, while they were on vacation.

    When the folks next door returned they found their own furniture gone, and an old recliner and TV stand where their own furniture once was. Next time, just hire a decorator. ( Read 2 ) 2. The Birdie Don't flip out, flip off.

    A 14-year feud between two Chino Hills, California, residents began over a koi pond. Instead of raising the white flag, one woman decided to raise something else -- a massive middle finger statue, aimed directly at her neighbor's house. ( Read 3 ) (And of course this isn't the first time 4 .) 3. The Identity Thief This is not how you make friends.

    Anthony James David of Florida wanted to do something nice for his neighbors and take them to a football game. Only problem? They were paying for it.

    Turns out David had stolen their identity and was using their credit cards to pay for their day of fun. He racked up nearly $3000 worth of charges on the stolen cards. ( Read 5 ) 4. The Lotto Lout Sometimes the big winners are real losers.

    Michael Carroll won a $14.4 million payout in 2002, and collected his prize while still wearing a court ordered ankle bracelet 6 for a petty crime. He blew his cash on drugs, prostitutes and a mansion in Swaffham, England. 7 British tabloids dubbed him the "Lotto Lout" and he made headlines for terrorizing his neighbors 8 with wild late night parties and backyard demolition derbies 9 . His good luck and money soon dried up, and in 2013 he was reportedly working in a cookie factory and earning about $300 a week. ( Read 10 ) 5.

    Pool Raft Lover If you thought the worst thing a neighbor could do was pee in your pool, think again. Edwin Tobergta was arrested in 2011 for pleasuring himself with his neighbor s pink inflatable raft. Two years later, the pool toy was apparently not disposed of and Tobergta returned for more man-on-float sex with the exact same raft. ( Read 11 ) 6.

    The Serial Poopetrator This guy stinks up the neighborhood.

    The elusive "Poopetrator" terrorizes Akron, Ohio by using cars in one particular neighborhood as his own personal dumping ground.

    There were at least 19 reports of fecal matter on car hoods-- and who knows how many more of the crapper's casualties went unreported? ( Read 12 ) References ^ Arthur Brown of Pennsylvania (www.huffingtonpost.com) ^ Read (www.huffingtonpost.com) ^ Read (www.wpxi.com) ^ first time (www.huffingtonpost.com) ^ Read (www.huffingtonpost.com) ^ still wearing a court ordered ankle bracelet (news.bbc.co.uk) ^ on drugs, prostitutes and a mansion in Swaffham, England. (news.bbc.co.uk) ^ for terrorizing his neighbors (www.telegraph.co.uk) ^ backyard demolition derbies (www.nytimes.com) ^ Read (www.huffingtonpost.com) ^ Read (www.huffingtonpost.com) ^ Read (www.huffingtonpost.com)

  • Armed police units called to Harleston incident Armed police units are currently at the scene of an incident in Harleston following reports of a woman in distress. Source: http://www.dissmercury.co.uk/armed_police_units_called_to_harleston_incident_1_3779887 1 Other posts from this source: Diss Mercury - News 2 This entry was posted on September 22, 2014 at 16:50 and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 3 feed.

    References ^ http://www.dissmercury.co.uk/armed_police_units_called_to_harleston_incident_1_3779887 (www.dissmercury.co.uk) ^ Read other posts by Diss Mercury - News (norfolklocalnews.co.uk) ^ RSS 2.0 (norfolklocalnews.co.uk)

  • Art Classes with Dawn Pretty Relaxed and informative weekly classes at various venues: Experience how developing your creativity can enhance your enjoyment of life; making even the mundane sight, seem magnificent. Regular weekly classes; payment is in 4 week blocks after trying one single session. Each class has a break with refreshments and cookies.

    Beginners or experienced painters You will receive a warm welcome. MONDAYS: 1.30pm-3.30pm: Bring watercolours or any medium: Stella Peskett Hall Southwold: 10 TUESDAYS 10am-12.30pm: Bring any materials Shadingfield Village Hall: 11 WEDNESDAYS One off workshops: 10.30am-3pm: Various mediums: SEE Events coming up 1 The Cut Halesworth 35 Why not suggest the subject and date you would like, so it may be arranged. THURSDAYS: 1.30pm-4pm: Bring oil or acrylic materials: The Cut Halesworth: 11 THURSDAYS: 4pm-5pm: School aged children: All materials provided: The Cut Halesworth: 10 FRIDAYS: 10am-12.30pm: Watercolours materials are provided The Cut Halesworth: 16 Contact Dawn Pretty to book or discuss.

    Terrified beginners welcome!

    Related References ^ Events coming up (www.dawnpretty.com)

  • Arts Workshops: Saints in the Making: Art festival Saints in the Making A Festival Celebrating Local Life Monday 3 August 2015 Friday 7 August 2015 A new art festival is kicking off in the villages around Lammas and Buxton Aylsham area. Workshops for all. Unless otherwise stated 3 per person per workshop, or 5 where materials are provided.

    Discounted season tickets available for 3 or more workshops (please also see notes at end of programme) Monday 3 August 10-12am Painting with Oils: How to mix colours (1 st of 2) John Rose Lammas Church 10-12am Painting on Silk (1 st of 3) Deb Cousins Badersfield Church 2-4pm Modelling with Clay (1 st of 3) Crispin Clark Buxton Church 6-8pm Oxnead Arts Soiree Art, Music, Entertainment TICKETS 01603 279630 Bishop of Lynn David Aspinall Oxnead Hall Tuesday 4 August All day events at Cawston Church 10-12am Watercolours (1 st of 4) Playing with watercolours Pat Tinsley Lammas Church 10-12am Introducing Craft Workshops Horstead Tithe Barn Caf 10-12am Spirituality Workshop Paul Thomas Aldborough Church 2-4pm Watercolours (2 nd of 4) Colour and Composition Pat Tinsley Lammas Church 2-4pm Letter Carving Sculptor Andy Hibberd Aylsham Church 2-4pm Introducing Bookbinding Chris Sandom Stratton Strawless Church 7-9pm Running a Church Picture Sale Fundraiser Janne Capie Oxnead Church (no charge) Wednesday 5 August 10-2am Beginning on Spinning Brenda Warman Marsham Church 10-12am Play-Doh for Families Christine Clark Buxton Church (no charge) 10 12 am Painting on Silk (2 nd of 3) Deb Cousins Badersfield Church 10 12 am Craft Workshop Sylvia Coward & others Horstead Church 10 4pm Exhibition of Calligraphy Horsford Church 2 4pm Pen and Wash Art Workshop Diana Perowne Brampton Church 2 4pm Modelling with Clay (2 nd of 3) Crispin Clark Buxton Church 2 4pm Craft Workshop Sylvia Coward & others Horstead Church 2 4pm Letter Carving Sculptor Andy Hibberd Aylsham Church 4 6pm Art and Life? Now You re Talking Tim Bennoy Lammas Church (no charge) 7.30 pm Praying with Icons Chris Engleson Coltishall Church (no charge) Thursday 6 August 10-12am Sketching & Watercolours (3 rd of 4) Pat Tinsley Lammas Church 10-12am Craft Workshop Sylvia Coward & others Horstead church 10-4pm Exhibition of Calligraphy Horsford Church 2-4pm Parachuting Teddies Teddy Bears Picnic Horsford Church 2-4pm Pure Poison or Sheer Good Health? The Properties of Plants Sarah Howard Oxnead Hall 2-4pm Making a Necklace Chris Sandom Stratton Strawless Church 2-4pm Working towards Weaving Brenda Warman Marsham Church 2-4pm Craft Workshop Sylvia Coward & others Horstead church 7-9pm Painting in Watercolour (4 th of 4) Pat Tinsley Lammas Church Friday 7 August 10-12am Modelling with Clay (3 rd of 3) Crispin Clark Buxton Church 10-12am Painting on Silk (3 rd of 3) Deb Cousins Badersfield Church 2-4pm Painting with Oils: How to mix colours (2 nd of 2) John Rose Lammas Church 7-9pm Looking Back, and Forward, through Art Tim Bennoy The de Brecy Trust Oxnead Hall Norfolk Knitters Pergola will be on display all week at Marsham church Burgh and Buxton Churches will also host Bargain Picture Sales (50% to venue church & 50% to donor) on Wednesday 5 th and Thursday 6 th from 10am to 3pm.

    Alongside these workshops in churches, the work of some artists will be shown, including Pat Tinsley of Lammas ad Tom Cringle of Buxton, and Norwich-based Gena Ivanov; all at Oxnead Hall see website for more details nearer the time www.dioceseofnorwich.org/news/events 1 scroll down to August Arts Workshops advert We can promote your business 2 every week on the Iceni Post!

    Related References ^ www.dioceseofnorwich.org/news/events (www.dioceseofnorwich.org) ^ business (icenipost.com)

  • As Kate Middleton and Prince William turn their backs on London ... With its sprawling estates, remote location and impeccably well-bred gentry known as the Turnip Toffs it s no surprise that Norfolk is the centre of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge s world. By enrolling two-year-old Prince George at a rural nursery school in the village of East Walton, William and Kate have made a declaration of intent. They are no longer Londoners but (ooh, arrr!) Norfolk folk.

    And since Princess Charlotte s christening last summer at Sandringham, they have been spending ever more time in the county with a close circle of Norfolk friends. With its sprawling estates, remote location and impeccably well-bred gentry known as the Turnip Toffs it s no surprise Norfolk is the centre of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge s world No fewer than three of Charlotte s godparents have firm family links to the county. As you d expect, the Cambridges new court are all hugely posh and more than a little eccentric.

    These young blue bloods most of whom have houses as grand as the Cambridges Anmer Hall are discreet, trusted and, importantly for family-minded Kate, have small children of their own to play with George and Charlotte. So just who is who in the inner circle of Turnip Toffs? KATE S RIGHT HAND WOMAN Few women have won Kate s trust as thoroughly as Norfolk girl Sophie Carter.

    The winsome blonde, who is also godmother to Princess Charlotte, was part of the close-knit circle who celebrated the Duchess s 34th birthday at Anmer Hall earlier this month. She even made up part of the exclusive royal party who later attended St Mary Magdalene Church, Sandringham, for a service attended by the Queen that commemorated the 100th anniversary of Gallipoli. Discreet Sophie, who has been a friend to Kate for many years, is often to be found quietly by the Duchess s side at various parties and events.

    While in their younger days the girls used to party the nights away, they now mainly watch tennis (they play together and hang out at Wimbledon), though they were pictured cheering exuberantly at Cirque du Soleil for Kate s 31st birthday. The daughter of Norfolk construction tycoon Robert Carter, Sophie is also, helpfully, an expert in early years learning, having been a nursery and prep school teacher. The Durham University graduate has developed a phonics educational app, Hip Hop Hen , with which Prince George is no doubt already familiar.

    WILLS' TRUSTED CHILDHOOD CHUM One man can be said to have inspired the royal decampment to North Norfolk and that s Prince George s godfather, 37-year-old William van Cutsem. His landowner parents actually rented Anmer Hall in the Nineties, and Princes William and Harry were regular guests at the property. It s fair to say, then, that the Prince has many happy childhood memories of the place that s now his own home.

    Indeed, van Cutsem s mother, Emilie, was an important maternal figure to him after the death of his own mother, Princess Diana. Today, the van Cutsems live less than half an hour from Anmer, on a 4,000-acre estate near Swaffham. The late Hugh van Cutsem, Prince Charles s friend from Cambridge who died in 2013, built an enormous brick and flint neo-Georgian house with its own chapel there in the Nineties.

    One man can be said to have inspired the royal decampment to North Norfolk and that s Prince George s godfather, 37-year-old William van Cutsem (pictured with wife Rosie) Fortunately for the Cambridges, the much-trusted William van Cutsem has also chosen to move back to Norfolk from London with his blonde wife, Rosie. He s tall, handsome, debonair and discreet, something that William relies on. According to a friend, van Cutsem knows every inch and cranny of Norfolk every pub, every discreet publican, every country house, the yachts, horses, home help.

    Chartered surveyor William, who works for a property development company based in Bury St Edmunds, is considered to be the most handsome and best shot of the four van Cutsem brothers. So he was quite a catch, then... Indeed, the two Williams have a history of, shall we say, trading girlfriends.

    Van Cutsem s wife, the former Rosie Ruck Keene, consoled the Prince when he briefly split from Kate in 2007. And he also dated van Cutsem s old flame, Olivia Hunt, while they were at university together. As well as blonde good looks, former City headhunter Rosie has an entrepreneurial streak.

    Recent business dabblings include starting a private riding club, as well as launching a fashion brand, Troy London, with her sister. Described as an outwear brand , it sells things such as cashmere capes with a fox fur trim for 950. Perfect for watching your husband shoot in the chilly Norfolk countryside, one would imagine.

    KATE S EX AND HIS FASHIONISTA WIFE Weekend visitors to Norfolk include Kate s ex-boyfriend from St Andrews, cricket-playing lawyer and local boy Rupert Finch. He is married to Prince William s old friend, Lady Natasha Rufus Isaacs, daughter of the Marquess of Reading and the co-founder of ethical fashion label Beulah which happens to be one of Kate s favourites. Rupert Finch and Natasha Rufus Isaacs pictured at the Cartier Queen's Cup at Windsor in 2015 While in Norfolk, the couple stay with Rupert s horsey parents, who live in an idyllic brick-and-flint farmhouse in North Creake, outside Fakenham, surrounded by land that belongs to William s uncle, Earl Spencer.

    The Finches also have a baby daughter, Georgia, who is a perfect playmate for Princess Charlotte. FROM COCKTAILS IN BOUJIS TO PEEKABOO WITH PRINCESS CHARLOTTE They once drank cocktails in London club Boujis with Kate and William, but today Charlie Savory and his wife, Lucy, are more likely to be playing peekaboo with Princess Charlotte. Norfolk lad Savory, an accountant, was brought up at Thorpland Hall, a Tudor house outside Great Snoring, North Norfolk.

    Today, he works for a firm in Norwich. He and Lucy, a major-general s daughter, have a young son and daughter, ideal playmates for George and Charlotte. They once drank cocktails in London club Boujis with Kate and William, but today Charlie Savory and his wife, Lucy, are more likely to be playing peekaboo with Princess Charlotte Another nearby chum is Rory Penn, a childhood friend of William s.

    Married to Francesca, the couple have two young daughters and live outside Burnham Market, the Sloaney village in Norfolk where Kate likes to go shopping. Penn whose grandmother is the Queen s cousin has also set up a property company with Thomas van Straubenzee, another of Charlotte s godfathers. Last year, Penn helped to sell a 39 million penthouse at the Bulgari hotel in London s Knightsbridge, so he s clearly doing all right for himself.

    The third Norfolk godparent to Charlotte is William s literary first cousin Laura Fellowes (pictured) THE COUSIN WHO LOVES TO TEASE The third Norfolk godparent to Charlotte is William s literary first cousin Laura Fellowes. Her parents are Lady Jane Princess Diana s elder sister and Lord (Robert) Fellowes, the Queen s Private Secretary, who is said to be the most charming dinner guest in the county . Fellowes comes from Norfolk stock himself.

    Indeed, his father was the Queen s land agent at Sandringham. Shy and delightful , Laura was a bridesmaid at Fergie s 1986 wedding, and shared a flat at Edinburgh University with William s old crush, Isabella Calthorpe, who is now married to Sam Branson, son of Virgin tycoon Sir Richard. Very close to her royal first cousins, William and Harry, Laura is allowed to tease them both mercilessly according to a friend.

    While she s notably discreet and terribly loyal, Laura is also known for her vivacious character and love of riding and dogs. She married equity analyst Nick Pettman in 2009 in Snettisham, west Norfolk, where her parents live in a pretty, old rectory. William and Kate were both guests at that wedding there is no greater indication of inner-inner circle status than getting both of them at your wedding, says one associate.

    Other than becoming a godparent, of course. Today, Laura writes fiction under the name Mave Fellowes her nickname is Mavis and has two young sons to play with George. DIVINE DAVINA, THE GLAMOROUS BLONDE Also on hand to chat about nursery schools and phonics with Kate is the glamorous blonde Davina Barber, nee Duckworth-Chad.

    The Duckworth-Chads are perennial Turnip Toffs, as well as being second cousins of William s, and live in splendour at red-brick Pynkney Hall near King s Lynn. Davina s mother, Elizabeth, was first cousin to Diana, who was her bridesmaid. Davina Duckworth-Chad and her husband Tom Barber pictured at a wedding in 2011 Elizabeth is still on good terms with Prince Charles and the whole family attended William and Kate s 2011 nuptials.

    Beauty Davina, with whom William has a strong, jocular friendship , lives in Norfolk with her Old Etonian husband, Tom Barber (above with Davina), who runs a luxury travel agency. They have twin daughters. THE DASHING DINNER PARTY HOST While most of the Cambridges inner-circle are married with young families, Old Etonian Archie Soames is an exception.

    Great-grandson of Winston Churchill, he is a close confidant of William s. The 27-year-old financier holds lively dinner parties at his Norfolk family home, West Barsham Hall, near Fakenham racecourse. William and Kate are regular guests.

    Though still single, Soames did notably have a liaison with the much older American model Caprice when he was only 17, after meeting her at the London nightclub Boujis. THE PRINCE'S FOOTY-MAD MATE Football-mad Tom Howard is the son of Tory grandee and life peer Lord (Greville) Howard. The Howard family have played very shouty football with William and Harry for years, including at the annual Christmas Eve match which is held at the family s estate, Castle Rising.

    And if everyone in the Cambridges Norfolk circle has an estate, the Howards outdo them all with Castle Rising, which is right next to Sandringham. Not only does it have a Victorian Hall that the family live in, it also has an ancient keep which was the palace-in-exile of Queen Isabella, the widow and alleged murderess of Edward II. ETON PAL HITCHED TO A PRINCESS Just 60 or so miles from Anmer which is nothing for East Anglia folk, who consider an hour in the car nipping round the corner live Lord and Lady Tollemache in the ancient, vast and moated Helmingham Hall, where the Queen is a regular overnight guest.

    Their two sons are both true Turnip Toffs: banker Edward, Prince Charles s godson, and his wife, Sophie, have two young sons; and fund manager James, who was at Eton with William, is married to Princess Florrie von Preussen (of Prussia), who used to style for Oka, the upmarket interiors label owned by Samantha Cameron s mother. It was at James s 21st that William did a lap of the moat, clad only in his boxer shorts, with his good friend Guy Pelly. Those kind of larks are unlikely to happen again until Prince George is a teenager or at least until Harry comes to stay.

    BADGER WHO WAS WILLS' BEST MAN Alongside Sophie Carter at church for the Gallipoli commemorations was James Meade, fellow godparent to Charlotte and an Old Etonian chum of William s. Nicknamed Badger (he picked up the moniker at university but the reason is lost in the mists of time), he is such a close friend to the Duke that he made the joint best man s speech at the royal wedding. He s close to Kate, too, taking her to the Badminton Horse Trials during her split from William in 2007.

    Badger s wife is Lady Laura Marsham, daughter of the Earl and Countess of Romney, and one of the key movers and shakers of the Turnip Toffs set. The Romneys live at Gayton Hall, a Georgian house outside King s Lynn which has a 20-acre water garden. THE ELEGANT ARISTOS The Earl and Countess of Leicester are Tom and Polly Coke and are a few years older than William and Kate There are the two rival grandees of North Norfolk: the Leicesters of Holkham and the Cholmondeleys of Houghton.

    Both make up part of William s Norfolk shooting circle. The Earl and Countess of Leicester are Tom and Polly Coke (pronounced Cook) and are a few years older than William and Kate. While Polly is a former milliner, giving her easy chit-chat with fashion-conscious Kate, former Army boy Tom is a royal equerry.

    Norfolk s glamour pair are the Marquess and Marchioness of Cholmondeley filmmaker David, 55, and his wife, socialite and model Rose (pictured at the Serpentine Gallery last summer) They have four children, and home, Holkham, is a Palladian masterpiece with a 25,000-acre estate and a four-mile-long beach where Prince Charles and Princess Anne used to play.

    Norfolk s glamour pair are the Marquess and Marchioness of Cholmondeley filmmaker David, 55, and his wife, socialite and model Rose (above), who is some 24 years his junior.

    They live at Houghton Hall, once home to Britain s first Prime Minister, Sir Robert Walpole.

  • Attleborough & Thetford Weekly Crime Summary 4 10 Sep 13 ... he following is a local policing update for the Attleborough neighbourhood Over the last week again crime has been low for the time of year although we cannot be complacent. There was a Burglary in the Shipdham area on Friday 6th September where two watches were stolen, at this time the investigation continues. We had a great result in catching a known burglar in Swaffham.

    He was seen in a care home, quickly identified and arrested in the area. The main areas of concern as previously stated is rural areas, a Quad Bike was stolen in Great Hockham, fortunately we have located the stolen bike and will be looking at forensic possibilities. Remember keep a look out and if you see anything suspicious call 101.

    Message from Chief Inspector Porter Please note the information contained within the crime summary is information suitable for public distribution and does not include certain categories that may have personal privacy or data protection implications.

    40361/13 Burglary in a Building other than a Dwelling BROADWAY ROCKLAND ST. PETER ATTLEBOROUGH Between 05 Sep 2013 22:35 and 05 Sep 2013 22:55 Padlock on metal gate forced to gain access to farm in rural location. Padlock on shed then cut and several sets of vehicle and shed keys stolen.

    Second shed entered and digger driven out of yard.

    40987/13 Burglary in a Building other than a Dwelling LITTLE HOCKHAM LANE GREAT HOCKHAM THETFORD Between 27 Aug 2013 09:15 and 08 Sep 2013 15:00 Quad bike stolen from garage.

    40804/13 Other Criminal Damage To A Vehicle ARLINGTON WAY THETFORD Between 05 Sep 2013 16:00 and 06 Sep 2013 04:00 Overnight the valve on the rear nearside tyre was removed, air released from tyre and valve replaced. Victim then drove vehicle the following day causing damage to the side wall of tyre.

    40501/13 Theft If Not Classified Elsewhere CYPRUS ROAD ATTLEBOROUGH Between 30 Aug 2013 17:00 and 02 Sep 2013 11:30 Security light damaged and a wooden planter stolen from front garden.

    41092/13 Theft Of Motor Vehicle WOODCOCK ROAD WRETHAM THETFORD Between 09 Sep 2013 19:00 and 10 Sep 2013 05:00 A John Deere tractor stolen.

    41134/13 Arson Not Endangering Life ETHEL COLMAN WAY THETFORD Between 06 Sep 2013 11:00 and 08 Sep 2013 16:00 Garage door and roof damaged.

    41132/13 Burglary Dwelling MELFORD BRIDGE ROAD THETFORD Between 08 Sep 2013 15:00 and 08 Sep 2013 17:30 Entry gained via small insecure window and a satellite navigation system stolen.

    41088/13 Other Criminal Damage MUNDFORD ROAD THETFORD Between 07 Sep 2013 06:00 and 09 Sep 2013 07:45 Fence damaged.

    41187/13 Other Criminal Damage COLVESTON THETFORD Between 24 Aug 2013 21:16 and 08 Sep 2013 21:16 Damage caused to electric fence unit and fence posts surrounding a pheasant enclosure.

    41290/13 Other Criminal Damage To A Building Other Than A Dwelling CAGE LANE THETFORD Between 01 Sep 2013 19:00 and 02 Sep 2013 08:00 Wooden door of male public toilets damaged.

    40638/13 Other Criminal Damage to A Dwelling ROPE WALK THETFORD Between 07 Sep 2013 04:00 and 07 Sep 2013 04:10 Two windows shattered.

    40340/13 Other Criminal Damage To A Vehicle ST. MARTINS WAY THETFORD Between 05 Sep 2013 19:15 and 05 Sep 2013 19:30 Offside wing mirror damaged.

    40404/13 Other Criminal Damage To A Vehicle WINCHESTER WAY THETFORD Between 03 Sep 2013 18:00 and 05 Sep 2013 08:10 Wiper blades broken off vehicle.

    41079/13 Theft If Not Classified Elsewhere LYNFORD THETFORD Between 06 Sep 2013 21:00 and 09 Sep 2013 06:00 The metal trailer part from a water bowser stolen.

    40302/13 Theft Of Pedal Cycle PEPPERS CLOSE WEETING BRANDON Between 04 Sep 2013 21:30 and 05 Sep 2013 07:30 Pedal cycle stolen from driveway.

  • Attleborough and Thetford Neighbourhood Weekly Crime Summary ... Message from Chief Inspector Porter This week has been successful with several key arrests of individuals committing our rural crime. However the trend continues with tools being stolen and areas around Swaffham have been affected with tools taken from three sheds in Holme Hale and a garage in Necton. In Dereham two shops were entered overnight and cash was stolen on both occasions.

    Entry was gained via the roofs, so if you see anyone trying to climb on a roof in the town call police immediately. In Thetford there were two burglaries over the last week and we successfully located the offender for one of these crimes, who has been charged. The second is unconnected to the first but occurred in early hours of the morning on the 3rd December in the area of Melford Bridge Road, where a man forced entry to the front door.

    If you saw anything suspicious in the area please let us know. Finally there is a trend nationally with the theft of catalytic converters and we have seen a slight increase with vehicles in the Swaffham and Thetford areas being targeted, but it is believed the persons responsible may target other areas too. Again these crimes are rare and we are out there each night proactively patrolling the areas that are being targeted.

    If you see anything suspicious please don t hesitate to call 101. You can dial 101 if you have any information about the crimes listed here or want to talk to local police about any issues. The new non-emergency number is now in use across the country and is the quick and easy way to contact police in non-emergency situations.

    In an emergency, if a life is in danger or a crime is in progress, always use 999. For further crime prevention advice and news from your neighbourhood visit www.norfolk.police.uk 1 . Please note the information contained within the crime summary is information suitable for public distribution and does not include certain categories that may have personal privacy or data protection implications.

    54313/13 Other Criminal Damage To A Building Other Than A Dwelling STATION ROAD ATTLEBOROUGH Between 28 Nov 2013 23:00 and 29 Nov 2013 10:50 Window smashed.

    55092/13 Other Criminal Damage To A Vehicle PINE COURT ATTLEBOROUGH Between 03 Dec 2013 23:00 and 04 Dec 2013 06:00 All four tyres on vehicle punctured and the nearside windscreen wiper broken off.

    54912/13 Burglary Dwelling MELFORD BRIDGE ROAD THETFORD Between 03 Dec 2013 02:30 and 03 Dec 2013 02:37 Forced entry by kicking in the front UPVC door panel and a shoulder bag and contents stolen from the living room.

    55125/13 Burglary in a Building other than a Dwelling ST. JOHNS WAY THETFORD Between 04 Dec 2013 12:30 and 04 Dec 2013 13:20 Car battery stolen from insecure garage.

    54591/13 Interference With A Motor Vehicle MELFORD BRIDGE ROAD THETFORD Between 30 Nov 2013 00:30 and 30 Nov 2013 18:30 Wheel nuts removed from alloy wheels.

    54723/13 Other Criminal Damage WOODRUFF ROAD THETFORD Between 01 Dec 2013 22:00 and 01 Dec 2013 22:15 Stone plant pot smashed in the centre of residential street.

    53895/13 Other Criminal Damage To A Building Other Than A Dwelling ST. MARTINS WAY THETFORD Between 14 Nov 2013 17:40 and 14 Nov 2013 18:15 Unknown person(s) gained access to single story flat roof and kicked a security light off its hinges.

    54791/13 Other Criminal Damage To A Building Other Than A Dwelling BURRELL WAY THETFORD Between 29 Nov 2013 16:30 and 02 Dec 2013 08:30 Unknown person(s) used apples, bricks and stones to break four large panes of glass at front of premises.

    54149/13 Other Criminal Damage to A Dwelling EDITH CAVELL CLOSE THETFORD Between 28 Nov 2013 15:45 and 28 Nov 2013 15:45 Glass conservatory door smashed.

    54668/13 Other Criminal Damage to A Dwelling LYNN ROAD CRANWICH Between 28 Nov 2013 05:30 and 28 Nov 2013 07:30 Drain pipe pulled away from building and smashed on the floor.

    54710/13 Other Criminal Damage to A Dwelling WOODRUFF ROAD THETFORD Between 01 Dec 2013 21:55 and 01 Dec 2013 21:58 A group of unknown males ripped off an external light from its location on the property.

    54704/13 Other Criminal Damage To A Vehicle SPINDLE DRIVE THETFORD Between 01 Dec 2013 21:45 and 01 Dec 2013 21:55 A group of 5 or 6 unknown males who were involved in damage to a house, threw a metal exterior house light through the rear window of Vauxhall Astra causing the screen to smash.

    54707/13 Other Criminal Damage To A Vehicle WOODRUFF ROAD THETFORD Between 01 Dec 2013 21:45 and 01 Dec 2013 21:55 A group of unknown persons 5 or 6 in total approached van, one of them then walked over the vehicle causing some dents to the bonnet, several other crimes in the area at the time.

    54713/13 Other Criminal Damage To A Vehicle CARAWAY ROAD THETFORD Between 01 Dec 2013 22:30 and 01 Dec 2013 22:35 Offside wing mirror detached and smashed.

    54743/13 Other Criminal Damage To A Vehicle ST.

    ALBANS WAY THETFORD Between 02 Dec 2013 00:30 and 02 Dec 2013 08:00 Blue paint sprayed around car, across the bonnet and down both sides.

    54307/13 Theft From A Motor Vehicle TEASEL DRIVE THETFORD Between 27 Nov 2013 23:30 and 29 Nov 2013 13:30 Catalytic converter stolen from underneath van.

    54750/13 Theft From A Motor Vehicle THISTLE CLOSE THETFORD Between 29 Nov 2013 18:00 and 02 Dec 2013 10:00 Catalytic converter removed and stolen from Sprinter van.

    54933/13 Theft From A Motor Vehicle SAXON PLACE THETFORD Between 28 Nov 2013 18:00 and 29 Nov 2013 13:00 Exhaust unbolted and stolen from vehicle.

    54974/13 Theft From The Person Of Another KING STREET THETFORD Between 02 Dec 2013 10:20 and 02 Dec 2013 10:40 Bank card stolen.

    54756/13 Theft Of Motor Vehicle THETFORD ROAD THETFORD Between 30 Nov 2013 04:00 and 02 Dec 2013 07:00 Water bowser stolen.

    References ^ www.norfolk.police.uk (www.norfolk.police.uk)

  • Attleborough Weekly crime summary 1-8 March 2012 The following is a local policing summary for the Attleborough neighbourhood Weekly crime summary 1-8 March 2012 Overview of Breckland Policing Commander Rural crime continues to be a priority for us, particularly in the north-west of the district, in the area between Swaffham and Mundford and also along the county border, where we are working collaboratively with our colleagues from Suffolk. While many thefts happen overnight there is evidence to suggest criminals are active during the day, probably gathering information on potential targets. I would ask people to remain vigilant at all times and report any suspicious activity such as vehicles or people found in unusual places, or any writing, signs and symbols that may appear on roads, posts or fuel tanks, potentially put there to indicate possible targets.

    Please take steps to make sure property kept in isolated locations is secure and we can of course provide advice on security, lighting, alarms and other steps to help you avoid becoming a victim of crime. Recently, we ve had reports of roofing material being taken from premises in Dereham and again I would urge people to remain vigilant to metal thefts and report any suspicious activity. Officers regularly stop vehicles carrying scrap metal with the majority being perfectly legal.

    Two arrests were made in Thetford this week where offenders were found to be carrying copper piping. Chief Inspector Paul Durham There have been further reports of break-ins to sheds and out buildings in the Great Cressingham/Swaffham areas. Local residents are asked to remain vigilant and make sure property is locked and secure.

    Incidents of suspicious activity should be reported to police on the non-emergency number 101 . Motorists are advised to remove all valuables from vehicles following car break-ins in the Thetford/Mundford areas at varying times of day. Valuables should be removed from sight, ideally completely out of the vehicle and it should be left locked and secure.

    If you witness people acting suspiciously near cars, call 101 , if a crime is in progress dial 999 . A man found to have stolen a number of items from Sainsbury s in Forest Retail Park has been issued with an 80 fixed penalty notice after he was detained by security staff. He has also been banned from the store.

    Please note the information contained within the crime summary is information suitable for public distribution and does not include certain categories which may have personal privacy or data protection implications. Crimes may not be reported to us until well after the event. Suspect(s) gained access through ground floor window.

    Burglary Dwelling with Intent Entry to premises and taken an electric push bike. Burglary in a Building other than a Dwelling WEST HARLING ROAD EAST HARLING person/s unknown have removed bike from IP s shed. Burglary in a Building other than a Dwelling with Intent rear door has been forced causing damage to the inside bolt and the wood burner has been partially pulled out of the fire place.

    persons have damaged IP s wooden garden arch by throwing bricks in IP s back garden.

    Theft From A Motor Vehicle person(s) have smashed the near side front passenger window of victims car and taken her handbag from within which had been left under the seat the handbag contained purse, keys driving license cash and credit/debit cards.

    Theft If Not Classified Elsewhere WALNUT CLOSE GREAT HOCKHAM Persons have entered the rear garden and have removed a quantity of heating oil from her oil tank.

  • Audio: Apple Fun day in Swaffham On Saturday 12th September 2015, Swaffham was treated to an Apple fun day which was jointly hosted at The Green Britain Centre and at the Swaffham Community Orchard Swaefas Swale. This slideshow requires JavaScript. The theme was apples and there was a chance for visitors to explore the orchards, have their apples identified, make apple pies, apple tree growing advice and taste apple juice fresh from the orchards.

    There were a variety of stalls at the Green Britain Centre these included bee keeping, growing organic vegetables, managing food waste and encouraging wildlife. Whilst at the Swaffham Community Orchard visitors were able to try their hands at traditional crafts including willow weaving, green woodworking and scything. The popular vegetarian caf at the Green Britain centre was also open all day serving a selection of homemade cakes and organic food.

    Turbine Tours were also available.

    Breckland View reporter Paul Young went along to the Green Britain Centre and brings us these reports: Here he talks to Paul Woodmin and Bob Lever Bob Lever (right) sharing his knowledge of apples Brian Saunders Brian Saunders with beekeeping advice Emma Lewins, Breckland Council Emma Lewins Lydia Woolway, RSPB Lydia Woolway Breckland Master Gardeners Maggie Baldwin, Breckland Master Gardener Breckland Master gardener, Robert French gives apple growing advice.

    Useful weblinks please see below:

  • Audio: Brecks FM will be on 106.9 FM November 15, 2015, 4:03 pm Work on the infrastructure to enable Watton Radio to start broadcasting as the community radio station Brecks FM next year is going well. This slideshow requires JavaScript. A drive is currently on to attract funding to help secure the installation of the aerial and software to enable broadcasting to begin.

    It is anticipated that a public meeting will be held early in the new year by the Brecks FM team for local people, businesses and organisations to hear about the radio plans for the future and how the local community can be involved.

    Breckland View reporter and Watton Radio presenter Paul Young went along to the studios in November and brings us this report: Useful weblinks please see below: If you would like more information about Brecks FM or would like to make a donation then please contact: Share this article with your friends:

  • Audio: Cordelia Spence – Stuff of Dreams Theatre Company Stuff of Dreams Theatre Company serve a new and dramatic dish, The Poisoners Pact at The Queen s Hall Watton on Wednesday 28th October at 7.30pm, with support from the arts and community development charity Creative Arts East. The Poisoners Pact Based on true life events at Burnham Market in the 1830s, the play relates the story of the last two women to be hanged in Norfolk. Catherine Frary and Frances Billings were found guilty of murder on several counts, dispatching their hapless victims by mixing arsenic into tasty dumplings, and were publicly hanged for their crimes in 1835.

    Using recipes and songs, the murderesses tell their own story, in what they considered to be simply a matter of Good Housekeeping . Watton Radio presenter Paul Young spoke to Cordelia Spence, Artistic Director of the Stuff of Dreams Theatre Company: You can see The Poisoners Pact at The Queen s Hall, Watton on Wednesday 28th October at 7.30pm. For more information and how you can buy tickets please click on the link here Wayland Festival 1 This event is organised in partnership with Creative Arts East with funding by Norfolk County Council, Arts Council England and Breckland Council.

    For further information on this and other Creative Arts East events please go to www.creativeartseast.co.uk/whats-on/ 2 or contact Karen Kidman on 01953 713390 or karen@creativeartseast.co.uk References ^ Wayland Festival (waylandfestival.org.uk) ^ www.creativeartseast.co.uk/whats-on/ (www.creativeartseast.co.uk)

  • Audio: Swaefas Swale Wassail On Sunday January 17th, the Old Twelfth Night a large group of people gathered at the Escape allotment in Swaffham 1 for a Wassail in the Swaefas Swale Orchard which is adjacent to the allotment on the old Swaffham to Dereham railway line. This slideshow requires JavaScript. The Old English words wassail, means be healthy or be whole which survive in the modern English phrase hale and hearty .

    A wassail is a traditional ceremony which seeks to start off the first stirrings of life in the land and to help it emerge from winter and to ensure that the next season s crop of fruit, especially apples and pears will be bountiful. Adrian Tebbutt led the ceremony, which started with Mary being crowned as the Wassailing Queen. Flaming torches were lit and a procession slowly went down through the orchard, led by Queen Mary and Escape allotment co-ordinator Katy Fullilove to the oldest tree in the orchard.

    This was chosen as a guardian to represent the other trees, pieces of toast soaked in cider were then placed in the tree and cider was poured around the base of it. The tree was then serenaded by the crowd with traditional wake up chants and rhymes led by Adrian. At the end of the ceremony, there was a parade through the orchard where everyone were invited to make as much noise as they could, to scare away evil spirits and to wake the sleeping trees.

    Once the ceremony was completed everyone went back to the Escape allotment and were treated to music and a wonderful selection of food and drink, including mulled cider.

    Breckland View reporter Paul Young went along and brings us this report: References ^ Escape allotment in Swaffham (www.crowdfunder.co.uk)

  • Audio: Swaffham celebrates 800 years King John visited Swaffham on the weekend of 18th & 19th July 2015, as Swaffham was celebrating 800 Years of Market Charter. This slideshow requires JavaScript. The Black Knight Historical staged re-enactments on the Camping Land with a Medieval market, fire breathing, archery, story telling, battles, minstrels, re-enactments of the signings of the Market Charter and Magna Carta.

    There was music and entertainment at the Buttercross in the market place with the Town Crier Nigel Wilkin keeping the crowds informed.

    There was also plenty of food and drink on offer.

    Breckland View reporter Paul Young went along and brings us this report: Please see below for some useful webslinks: Black Knight Historical Swaffham Town Council Swaffham Market 800 1 2 3 References ^ Black Knight Historical (www.blackknighthistorical.co.uk) ^ Swaffham Town Council (aroundswaffham.co.uk) ^ Swaffham Market 800 (www.swaffhammarket800.co.uk)

  • August Music in The Glade: Fairhaven Woodland Garden Norfolk Wherry Brass heads to Fairhaven Woodland and Water Garden at South Walsham on Sunday, August 2 2015. Followed by Norfolk Jazz Quartet on Sunday, August 9 2015. Both open-air concerts are in The Glade from 2pm to 4pm.

    Normal garden entry charges apply, adult 6.20, concessions 5.70 and child 3.65, under five free. Norfolk Wherry Brass concert programme is light and varied, appealing to all age groups and includes arrangements of pop songs, TV Theme tunes, hymns and foot-tapping marches. Norfolk Jazz Quartet plays swinging jazz standards and melodic music from the Great American Songbook, performed on a combination of clarinet and saxophone, guitar, bass and drums.

    Fairhaven Woodland and Water Garden is at South Walsham NR13 6DZ, nine miles east of Norwich, signposted off A47 at B1140 junction, t.

    01603 270449. www.fairhavengarden.co.uk. 1 The garden is open daily all year 10am to 5pm (closed Christmas Day and closes 4pm during the winter), also open Wednesdays until 9pm to the end of August. Free entry to tearoom, gift shop and plant sales.

    There is wheelchair access throughout the garden, including a Sensory Garden and boat trips (additional charge). Visitors requiring special facilities are advised to telephone in advance, mobility scooters available. Dogs are welcome on leads; small charge to cover poop scoop.

    advert We can promote your business 2 every week on the Iceni Post!

    Related References ^ http://www.fairhavengarden.co.uk Ctrl+Click or tap to follow the link (www.fairhavengarden.co.uk) ^ business (icenipost.com)

  • Autumn Colours Tour at Fairhaven Garden Enjoy the spectacular autumn colours at Fairhaven Woodland and Water Garden, South Walsham, with its mature oak and beech trees, on this guided walk on Sunday, November 15 at 11am. Included in the walk is the ancient King Oak, which was a sapling at the time of the Battle of Hastings and its neighbour the Queen Oak. Garden entry is 6.20 adult, 5.70 concessions, 3.65 child (under 5 free), no additional charge for the guided walk.

    Fairhaven Woodland and Water Garden is at South Walsham, nine miles east of Norwich, signposted off A47 at B1140 junction, www.fairhavengarden.co.uk 1 , t.

    01603 270449. The garden is open daily all year (closed Christmas Day); open 10am to 4pm from November to the end of February, free entry to tearoom, gift shop and plant sales. There is wheelchair access throughout the garden, including a Sensory Garden.

    Visitors requiring special facilities are advised to telephone in advance, mobility scooters available.

    Dogs are welcome on leads; small charge to cover poop scoop.

    Related References ^ www.fairhavengarden.co.uk (www.fairhavengarden.co.uk)