Category: Reedham

Norfolk Brewery History

Alewife Brewery About Alewife Brewery is the only brewery in Norfolk that is owned and run by a woman brewer, who, having spent much of her childhood and early married life living adjacent to hop gardens in Kent has been brewing for 25 years. All our beers are produced in a tiny brewery which has been built to our own design and specification. The brewing process is done totally by hand from crushing the whole grain to bottling.

We use a range of malted barley in our recipes which comes from the maltings just a few miles away. The different malts all give the beers different characteristics and all the barley used is grown using minimal amounts of artificial fertilizers and sprays. The majority of the malting barley is grown by Teddy Maufe at Branthill Farm Wells-next-the Sea.

Only whole leaf hops are used in our beers mainly Goldings and Wye-Challenger from Kent. Alewife Brewery History It is a fact that at the beginning of the 21st century the vast majority of brewers are men. Yet the craft was originally developed by the women of England who from the middle ages to the 18th century brewed beer as part of their household tasks; much like baking.

It was a skill which was much respected and valued. The justice of Rutland in 1610 decided that servants who could brew, bake and make malt should be paid 24s 8d per year, those who could not, were paid 1s 4d less. In the 18th century the philosopher Lorenz Crell wrote Educated men gape at the insuperable difficulties the common brewer faces while old women are able to make good beer with such ease.

The Alewife would often sell her surplus beer to passers by, standing a broom outside the gate as a sign that ale was for sale. With the wages so low especially for women it was often better financially for women to stay at home and make vitals such as beer for the family, rather than go out to work. Alewives made their own malt by soaking the barley in the wash tub until it sprouted, then laying it out to dry before rubbing it between their hands to remove the shoots.

It was then roasted over an open fire until the desired colour was obtained; a very skilful process. The Church was in charge of many of the breweries in the 14th century ; ale was often sold to raise money. The word ale was used to denote a special festival for fund raising purposes.

Gradually brew houses became bigger, brewing more and more ale and over the centuries much of the original craft of the Alewife wife. Alewife brewery uses the broom as its logo. Whilst our malt is made for us, much of the way alewives worked is reflected in our brewery.

We brew only small quantities of high quality hand made ale without chemical additives; using only whole hops and malt made from barley grown naturally using minimal amounts of artificial fertilizer and chemical spray. We believe this gives Alewife beers a distinct quality which is hard to beat. All Alewife beers are suitable for vegetarians.

Blanchfields Brewery First came the dream, then the brewing course at the University of Sunderland and after two years of planning and preparation, Publican Graham Blanchfield began brewing at the Bull Hotel in December 1997. A former Norwich Brewery house, the Bull is a welcoming town centre pub which is currently the main outlet for Graham s award winning beers. Brewing is currently undertaken once a week on the 2 -barrel plant.

There is sufficient fermenting capacity to increase this to three times a week, which is the next phase in the expansion programme, when the beers will be more widely available. Brewer, Graham, uses locally grown and malted barley, which is cracked fresh for each brew, and the finest English hops from Hereford. The beers are stored in a temperature controlled cellar and allowed to condition for 7 to 10 days.

Much has been achieved over the past months, Black Bull Mild won the Best New Brewer category at the Peterborough Beer Festival in 1998 and in the same year Bull Best Bitter won an award at the Norwich Beer Festival. Their range of home crafted beers are available for purchase in 17 and 34 pint containers so the connoisseur of good honest beer can enjoy them at home or at his local. The fully air tight containers will keep the beers in good condition for more than 1 week.

Blue Moon Brewery In March 1981 Peter Turner set up the Star Brewery, in Duke Street, Norwich, to supply his next-door free house, the Golden Star (and the local free trade). Sales to the free trade did not meet expectations and brewing ceased in 1982. The brewery was then reopened in late 1982 (by Hashmat Jalil) as the Tap Brewery which was also not particularly successful and closed in 1984.

The Golden Star is now owned by Greene King. Brancaster Brewery Brancaster Staithe is a productive little fishing village here on the North Norfolk Coast. Many local families still make their living from the Staithe, which has always been famous for its first class shellfish.

Take advantage of this Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty by taking a stroll along the North Norfolk Coastal Path or a wander on Barrow Common. They offer well kept ale, including their own brewed onsite followed by a friendly atmosphere and an open fire in the winter months. Feeling hugry?

The Blue Moon have an extensive menu and all of their meals are freshly prepared to order. Excellent range of seafood, including local mussels and oysters from the village harbour. Buffy s Brewery Buffy s produced its first beer in 1993 and gains its name from a well-known and revered former resident of the 15th Century Mardle Hall, home of the brewery.

The brewery was founded by Roger Abrahams & Julie Savory, firstly as a lifestyle choice, but as the beers became very popular with the local pub trade the decision was made to expand the business and offer a wider selection of fine ales to all. The company now employs five people including a dedicated brewer, sales rep and drayman. Over the last few years Buffy s has established itself as one of the leading brewers in the micro sector.

Our fine ales have won numerous awards at local and national level and we strive to produce the highest levels with every pint brewed. Buffy s Brewery will never compromise on quality Chalk Hill Brewery A brewpub, Chalk Hill Brewery has been brewing since 1993, located at the popular Coach & Horses pub on Thorpe Road, Norwich (conveniently close to Norwich Railway Station). Their Chalk Hill Bitter (CHB) abv 4.2% won Beer of the Festival at the Norwich Beer Festival three years in a row from 2001 to 2003.

Finnesko & Firkin Brewery The Reindeer Freehouse and Brewery commenced production in May 1987 (with Wolfe Witham a partner in the enterprise) bringing commercial brewing back to Norwich after a two-year break, following the closure of Watney s Norwich Brewery. The business was sold to the Allied-Domecq s Firkin chain in 1996 for an undisclosed but apparently very large amount of money! A new brewing plant was installed and the pub was completely gutted and refitted also.

Wolfe Witham later opened his Wolf Brewery in Attleborough. Firkin pubs serve beer brewed either on the premises, or imported from another pub in the chain. All of these Firkin Beers are unpasteurised and unfiltered.

Those served from casks qualify for CAMRA s definition of Real Ale, but those served from cellar tanks do not (due to the use of blanket pressure). Other ales and lagers are also available. Most pubs also serve Weston s Old Rosie (7.3%), a traditional cider, but some of the newer ones serve keg cider from a fake handpump.

Fox & Hounds Brewery Fox & Hounds brewery was the first pub in Heacham to be placed in CAMRA S good beer guide. Mark and Marie purchased the Fox and Hounds on 14th December 1999. The pub was in a semi derelict state and only sold Toby Bitter.

The first job was to install hand pumps and start selling real ale. After 2 years and 300 guest beers, Mark and Marie decided not to demolish the derelict cottage in the car park. Instead with the help of Brendan Moore (Iceni Brewery) we converted it into the FOX BREWERY.

The five barrel plant became a registered brewery on the 1st May 2002. In that same year we became the Independant Embiber s Micro Brewery of the Year We now produce a range of beers which are sold throughout the country on draft and in bottles. Humpty Dumpty Brewery Humpty Dumpty was featured in the following article below by EDP24: Hammer blows punctuate the cold air as Mick Cottrell paces around the echoing building which will, he is determined, one day house his dream brewery experience .

Already it is home to a busy and increasingly successful microbrewery, a prime example of a growing industry that is helping to shape the future of British beers. Mr Cottrell was gripped by the brewing bug when he went to one of the regular beer festivals at The Railway Tavern in Reedham, between Norwich and Yarmouth, and met the pub s then proprietor Ivan Cuders. The meeting was to set his life on a different track.

He launched the Humpty Dumpty brewery from former stables at the rear of the Railway Tavern and its first beer rolled out in December 1998. I just fancied a change from the construction industry, he said. I d never tried home-brew before that.

But we got a consultant in and learned from our mistakes. I know that for as many microbreweries that start up as many close, and that every year a couple close down in the area. The brewery s name comes from the nickname of a class of locomotive which used to steam through Reedham, and all the beers in the Humpty Dumpty range are named after the nicknames of locomotives which ran in the area.

Before long Mr Cottrell was having to brew three times a week to keep up with demand and as its success grew, he moved the brewery to its new home at the old Hales Snails factory on the edge of the village. While the beer bubbles away in the brewing tanks, his plans are gradually taking shape. We are going to start up a brewery shop with 700 different types of bottled beers from around the country, and different malts, bags of hops and brewery memorabilia.

And we will also run brewery tours, he said. Most microbreweries are just one or two men, often working from home or in the back of a pub. We have got to go to the next stage now and become a bigger brewery.

We now have 14 or 15 beers and we won the Darlington Beer Festival last year at only our second attempt with our lemon and ginger as well as a silver at the Norwich Beer Festival with our best bitter. We now distribute all over England and even to Scotland through brewery swaps. Our main markets are Essex and Kent although we are looking to expand.

It is difficult to sell your beer in East Anglia because there is heavy competition from the microbreweries like us and the bigger ones like Woodforde s and Adnams. He added We work seven days a week, but it doesn t feel like it. It is a lifestyle more than just a job.

It is a nice way to earn a living in that it is not so much work as a hobby which has taken over. Iceni Brewery Owner Brendan Moore had a dream one night of opening a brewery. Only a year later, without any prior experience, but armed with rundundancy money and a grant from the Rural Development Commision, he went ahead and his first brew rolled out in January 1995.

After three years the brewery has still managed to keep its rural feel while production has increased dramatically to keep up with the demand for the beers. The beers themselves are in general named after elements of Celtic folklore, in particular the Iceni tribe who used to inhabit the land on which the brewery now stands. Winter s Brewery Twice Champion Brewer of Britain Brewer of Award Winning Ales for many years at Woodfordes and Chalk Hill Breweries.

Now running his own brewery in Norwich. Wissey Valley Brewery They started brewing in the winter of 1999 at their pub The Ship at Brandon Creek where first Brendan Moore (Iceni) and then John Palmer (ex Greene King) put through what can only be described as two unique crash courses in brewing. I brewed mainly for the pub but also supplied several Beer Festivals as Cap n Grumpy s Beer Co.including Cambridge, Bury St.

Edmunds and Bedford where we won Best Beer award in 2001 for Cap n Grumpy s Best Bitter. In October 2002 we called time on our pub life after 10 years and moved to Stoke Ferry wife, children, dogs, rabbits, hamster and of course the brewery. Largely because of the decrease in duty payable on beer and also because of the relatively new capability to sell locally made produce direct to the public (particularly via Farmers Markets) and also because of my interest in all things related to Food and Drink I decided to set myself up initially as a small brewer selling bottled ales but with a long term aim of also becoming a small food producer selling beer related food.

The most obvious way to do this is to feed my own pigs the mash from the brews and then sell the meat. To this end our first weaners are arriving in a few weeks so wish me luck! Brewing from home soon became unworkable, so I asked the landlord of the Bluebell pub if he would like a small brew plant in his back garden.

He said Yes! And so the Wissey Valley Brewery, craft brewers of ales, milds, porters and stouts was formed and opened in July 2003. Wolf Brewery The Wolf Brewery has been established in Norfolk since 1996 and is continuing to go from strength to strength.

23rd CAMRA Beer Festival The Beer festival held at St. Andrews hall, Norwich at the end of October this year saw a fantastic turnout. There was a lot of interest in Our beers as well as those from other local breweries.

Special thanks go out to CAMRA for another very well organized festival. For more information on CAMRA please look at our links page. Norfolk & Norwich Festival Ale The Norfolk & Norwich Festival ale is still selling extremely well in the many pubs around Norfolk.

Remember this is a limited edition brew so if you haven t tried it yet don t hang around. Woodforde s Norfolk Ales Ray Ashworth began brewing in an industrial unit at Drayton, just outside Norwich, in May 1981. In early 1983 the business was transferred to a converted barn adjacent to the Spread Eagle P.H., at Erpingham.

Although a fire seriously damaged the building in July 1983 the brewery continued to flourish, expanding enough to warrant moving to even larger premises at Woodbastwick in 1989. Ray Ashworth sold the brewery to Dennis Nudd and Mike Betts in 1999. Woodforde s Broadland Brewery history 1 consist of: housed in partly thatched farm buildings, situated in the picturesque village of Woodbastwick, on the edge of the Norfolk Broads and some 6 miles to the North East of Norwich.

Everything about the brewery reflects care and attention to detail, and it is these qualities that have contributed to several of the beers becoming celebrated prize winners, including twice winning the supreme accolade of CAMRA s Champion Beer of Britain . The high quality water comes from the brewery s own borehole; the barley is grown in the surrounding East Anglian farmland, and malted in Norfolk in traditional-style floor maltings. Finest bitter and aromatic hops and the brewery s own yeast complete the recipe for success.

References ^ Broadland Brewery history (www.mynorwich.co.uk)

Great Yarmouth Heritage Open Days 2015

The Fishermen s Hospital An exciting programme of free tours and drop in events is on offer in the Borough of Great Yarmouth during Heritage Open Days weekend, Thursday 10 to Sunday 13 September 2015 Book a tour back to World War II at Blitz Street Scratby (10-13 September), or a guided walk On the Warpath: Piers and Bombs (10 September). Go on a tour featuring the Great & the Good Great Yarmouth (11 September) and get behind the scenes in Great Yarmouth Community Library (10 and 11 September). Go to Priory Gardens Past Times Fayre in Gorleston (13 September), see Great Yarmouth s Heritage & History in Pictures at the Great Yarmouth Mercury (10 and 11 September), explore the Masonic Royal Assembly Rooms (10-12 September) and visit the Fishermen s Hospital (10-13 September).

Head off to All Saints Church Horsey, which dates back to Saxon times (11-13 September) and Hopton Ruined Church (11-13 September). Walk from Reedham to Polkey s Mill and Reedham Marsh Steam House (10 September), or visit Morse s Wind Engine Park at Repps with Bastwick, the only collection of historic wind pumps in the UK (10-13 September). Visit the Elizabethan House Museum and Tolhouse Museum (both 10-13 September) and go to The Priory Centre (10 September).

Pick up a Great Yarmouth Heritage Open Days leaflet at the Tourist Information Centre, t.

01493 846346, or download a copy of the leaflet from www.great-yarmouth.co.uk/heritageopendays 1 . Great Yarmouth Minster Borough of Great Yarmouth Heritage Open Days events and tours full list Pre-Booked Events Blitz Street Scratby, NR29 3NS Thursday 10 to Sunday 13 September, tours at 10am and 2pm. Pre-booking only t.

01493 846346. A life size street scene made up of garden sheds transports you back to the 1940s and wartime life. See Nanny Morrison s cottage fitted out to make any wartime housewife proud, and buy sweets by the quarter in the corner shop.

BBC comedy classic Dad s Army is brought to life with a full size replica of Captain Mainwaring s office and new for 2015 visit the chemist with potions and lotions to cure all sorts of ailments. Visits by pre-booked tour only. Guided Walk On the Warpath: Piers and Bombs Meeting Place: Wellington Pier, Marine Parade, Great Yarmouth, NR30 3JF Thursday 10 September, 2pm Pre-booking required t.

01493 846346 Find out more about the Victorian piers and the former jetty, from which Nelson embarked for the battle of Copenhagen and the role they played in seafaring activities from the 1650 s onwards. Also discover stories of the town s war efforts during both world wars and how the seafront played its part. Guided Walk The Great & the Good Great Yarmouth Meeting Place: The Fishermen s Hospital, Great Yarmouth, NR30 1ND Friday 11 September, 2pm Pre-booking required via 01493 846346 Join this walk and find out just how Yarmouth became Great, including how the town grew over time featuring fishing, railways, rows and monks and which personalities played starring roles in the town s development up to and including recent times.

Drop in events no need to book The Fishermen s Hospital Market Place, Great Yarmouth, NR30 1ND Thursday 10 to Sunday 13 September, 10am 4pm. Talk given daily at 11am. The Fishermen s Hospital was built in 1702 by the corporation of Great Yarmouth for old or decayed fishermen.

It could house up to 40 residents, but now only nine cottages remain with 8 residents. Tours will include cottage no 8, which will be opened especially for HODs visitors. A talk will be given each day at 11am and tea & coffee will be available for HODs visitors.

Royal Assembly Rooms Albert Square, Great Yarmouth, NR30 3JH Thursday 10 to Saturday 12 September Tours at 11am and 2pm each day Originally designed to be Assembly and Reading Rooms in 1863, the building was bought from the Norfolk Militia by the Masons in 1919 and has undergone significant refurbishment. Take a look around this magnificent building. A guide will be on hand to answer all your questions.

Wind Energy Museum Morse Collection Marsh Road (Off Staithe Road), Repps With Bastwick, NR29 5JU Thursday 10 to Sunday 13 September, 10am to 4pm Great Britain s only collection of historical wind-pumps. Experience this unique museum with guided tours starting every half an hour on the social history & heritage of the site. There will also be illustrated talks on the hour about Norfolk Mills and their people plus other local topics.

Old Meeting Unitarian Church Greyfriars Way, Great Yarmouth, NR30 2SW Thursday 10 and Friday 11 September 10am to 4pm, Saturday 12 September 9am to 5pm, Sunday 13 September, 12.30pm to 2pm A chance to see a modern, light and airy church built in 1954 following the bombing of its predecessor in WWII. Learn about of this dissenting movement s presence in the town, from its establishment in 1644. Great Yarmouth Potteries 18/19 Trinity Place, Great Yarmouth, NR30 3HA Thursday 10 and Friday 11 September, 9.30am to 3pm Get transported back to Yarmouth past in this building with its tarred timbers and other nautical paraphernalia.

See the arrow slits and gargoyles in the medieval wall and the 700 year-old well, which is still in daily use. Children can make a small clay item, to take home free. Tolhouse Museum & Gaol Tolhouse Street, Great Yarmouth, NR30 2SH Thursday 10 to Sunday 13 September, 11am to 4pm Take a journey through crime and punishment in Great Yarmouth in one of England s oldest prisons.

Learn of the fates of thieves, smugglers, witches, pirates and murderers. Hear both gaoler and prisoners tell their tales of transportation, incarceration and execution. On 12 and 13 September, visit a convict in the cells and discover what hard labour really meant.

Great Yarmouth Minster Church Plain, Great Yarmouth, NR30 1NE Thursday 10 to Saturday 12 September 10am to 4pm, Sunday 13 September 11am to 4pm Great Yarmouth Minster was built in 1101 and is the largest parish church in the country. It was bombed during WWII, with just the walls and towers left standing. Restored by Stephen Dykes Bower between 1957 and 1961, this wonderful church is full of fascinating stories and history.

Special exhibition, The Sea and Great Yarmouth. Caister Lifeboat Visitor Centre Skippers Walk, Tan Lane, Caister-on-Sea, NR30 5DJ Thursday 10 September 10am to 3:30pm, tours at 11am and 2pm. Sunday 13 September, 10am to 3:30pm, tours at 11am and 2pm More than 200 years of lifeboat history is told through exhibits in the Visitor Centre.

New tours for HODs, feature some of the historical tragedies on the sandbanks and the story of Caister Lifeboat to the present day. HODs visitors will also have the chance to see inside the lookout tower which is the operational base for today s Caister National Coastwatch. Elizabethan House 4 South Quay, Great Yarmouth, NR30 2QH Thursday 10 to Sunday 13 September, 10am to 4pm Discover the lives of the families who lived here from Tudor through to Victorian times.

The house gives you a feel for day to day domestic life with rich period settings and evocative sounds and smells. Be a house detective in the exciting HODs museum trail. Sunday 12 make a Tudor Rose or a First World War poppy.

All Saints Church The Street, Village of Horsey, NR29 4EF Friday 11 September, 12noon to 5pm Saturday 12 September, 10am to 5pm Sunday 13 September, 12noon to 5pm with organ recital 12noon to 12.45pm A beautiful, ancient Saxon church with round tower and thatched roof. Photographic displays show the village and church through the ages, including the Horsey flood. Hopton Ruined Church Coast Road, Hopton on Sea, NR30 2QE Friday 11 to Sunday 13 September 10am to 3pm This Grade II listed ruin appears on the English Heritage Buildings at Risk register and is currently a conservation project led by the Great Yarmouth Preservation Trust.

Information will be available about the progress so far with access in the ruin for HODs visitors. Flintknapping demonstrations and taster sessions Friday 11: John Lord will demonstrate working with flints in an architectural setting. Children s Nature Workshop Saturday 12: Emma Purnell will be making a bug hotel for the ruin gardens to encourage wildlife.

Children s Archaeology Activity Day Sunday 13: Giles Emery will be doing archaeologically based activities aimed at budding young archaeologists to come and try out. Holy Trinity Church Norwich Road, Caister-on-Sea, NR30 5JN Saturday 12 September 9am to 4pm Dating from the 14th century church and re-built in the 18th century and beyond. Strong links with Caister Lifeboat throughout can be seen with memorials inside and outside the church, including a stunning stained glass window of Christ and the Fisherman, by Paul Woodruffe which commemorates the 1901 lifeboat disaster.

Quaker Meeting House Howard Street South, Great Yarmouth, NR30 1LN Saturday 12 September, 10am to 4pm Early 19th century Quaker Meeting House in a walled garden, which was once the burial ground. Quakers have worshiped in Great Yarmouth since 1649 and beneath the present building you can see the remains of a 14th century cell occupied by Augustinian Friars until the Dissolution of the Monasteries, c.1536. Royal Naval Hospital Queens Road, Great Yarmouth, NR30 3JU Friday 11 to Sunday 13 September, 11am to 3pm A former Navy hospital originally built for Nelson s men.

In 1815 it treated 600 soldiers injured at Waterloo. During WWII the hospital became HMS Watchful, co-ordinating mine sweeping operations and acting as an information centre and administrative headquarters for the Royal Navy. Now sympathetically converted into apartments and houses, the Chapel and one ward have been preserved.

Escorted tours to the chapel and ward may be available on request on the day. Holy Trinity & All Saints Church Somerton Road, Winterton-on-Sea, NR29 4AW Saturday 12 September, 10am to 3pm Winterton Church is renowned for its stately tower. The church has close connections with the sea: the crucifix that stands in Fisherman s Corner is carved from ship s timber, a trawler net forms its canopy; plaques record the valiant deeds of the village lifeboatmen, and a memorial records the sacrifice of Fr Clarence Porter, who died after saving a choirboy from drowning.

Polkey s Mill & Reedham Marsh Steam Engine House Wherryman s Way (footpath), Reedham, NR13 3UB Thursday 10 September, 12pm to 4pm The site includes a working drainage mill, which will be working weather permitting. Beside the mill is an old steam engine house built in 1880 (no steam engine). Visitors will be allowed access to the buildings.

Tours of Polkey s Mill in small groups will be available. It is also hoped to have the mid-1940 s diesel engines working and on show. Great Yarmouth Community Library Tolhouse Street, Great Yarmouth, NR30 2SH Thursday 10 September, tour at 2pm and Friday 11 September, tour at 10am.

Take part in a guided tour behind the scenes of Great Yarmouth Library. See examples of some of the local studies, collections and resources currently held in the depths of the library basement. These tours have been specially created for HODs visitors.

Not suitable for children under the age of 16. Great Yarmouth s Heritage & History in Pictures Great Yarmouth Mercury, 169 King Street, Great Yarmouth, NR30 2PA Thursday 10 September, 9am to 5pm and Friday 11 September, 9am to 5pm A new exhibition for 2015 HODs visitors. Take a trip down memory lane with a fascinating selection of images taken by staff photographers from the Great Yarmouth Mercury over the decades, covering the resort s heydays and holidays, plus pictures of local industries and businesses.

Guided Churchyard & Cemeteries Walk at Great Yarmouth Minster Church Plain, Great Yarmouth, NR30 1NE Friday 11 September, tour at 10.30am HODs visitors will be taken on a guided tour of the churchyard and cemeteries, led by local historian Paul Davies. Hear stories about the most important and interesting people buried there and be guided around some of the most significant monuments. The old and new cemeteries are also now recognised as a county wildlife site.

Priory Gardens Past Times Fayre High Street (behind council car park), Gorleston, NR31 6NJ Sunday 13 September, 10am to 4pm Local interest groups and schools will be exhibiting their heritage projects in the Priory Gardens. A marquee housing a vintage tearoom will provide refreshments and various activities will be taking place for HODs visitors including archery, donkey rides, brass band, and a wildlife show & tell . The Priory Centre Great Yarmouth Community Trust, The Priory Centre, Priory Plain, Great Yarmouth, NR30 1NW Thursday 10 September, 12noon to 4pm Originally a Benedictine Abbey founded in 1260 and used until the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1536.

A special exhibition for HODs visitors will feature photographs from its days as a school from 1854 to 1999.

HODs visitors who attended school here will have an opportunity to share their memories and organisers would love to see mementoes.

Related References ^ www.great-yarmouth.co.uk/heritageopendays (www.great-yarmouth.co.uk)

Norwich 20 Group Back Underground, The Undercroft

Norwich 20 Group (N20G) is making a return visit to The Undercroft, beneath Norwich War Memorial (entrance at The Guildhall end), with Norwich 20 Group Back Underground from Tuesday, June 9 to Saturday, June 27, open daily 12noon to 5pm, free entry, www.norwich20group.co.uk 1 . This exhibition of new large works and 3D installations follows Norwich 20 Group s successful first visit to The Undercroft in March 2014, during the group s 70th anniversary year. Forty N20G artists, plus three invited artists who work in installation media, Viv Castleton, Ivan Chambers and Lloyd Smith, are producing work specially for the exhibition.

Ivan Chambers and Lloyd Smith graduated from Norwich University of the Arts last summer. There will be work from both long-serving and newer members; Geoffrey Lefever, an abstract artist, joined the group in 1965 and David Lakshmanasamy, who produces 3D installations, has just joined N20G after serving one year as a licentiate member*. An evening fundraising event, The Language of Love Sound Underground, featuring music and poetry is being staged in The Undercroft on Friday, June 26 from 7pm to 9pm.

The event is free to attend, with a retiring collection for The Norwich Centre www.norwichcentre.org 2 and Norfolk based charity Nepal in Need http://nepalinneed.org 3 . Sarah Cannell Reedham Marsh Long Ditch. Rebecca Kemp Untitled .

Anne Allanson Swarf I. Poetry from N20G s 2009 exhibition Voicing Visions, Artists and Poets Collaborate, will feature in the Sound Underground event. Poetry panels from the exhibition will also be included in the Back Underground exhibition.

One of the poems is The Hand by Bill Jervis, inspired by the late David Holgate s sculpture of Julian of Norwich at Norwich Cathedral. Bill s evocative and thoughtful poem reflects on the transience of life and the eternal nature of sculpture. The piece will endure, linger long time Connecting our living to eternity from The Hand, Bill Jervis Frances Martin, curator of Norwich 20 Group Back Underground, who is also exhibiting in the show said: The Undercroft is a superb venue for the larger pieces and installations, which would not normally be included in our annual shows at The Forum.

I am very pleased that so many of our members are getting involved and contributing new work. One of the more reflective pieces by Viv Castleton, called Labour of Love, considers the impact of dementia on a loved one. The textile work in knitted wire and wood asks the viewer to consider how we communicate other than visually or verbally.

Our Sound Underground event will perfectly complement the main show. It has been a pleasure to revisit the Voicing Visions exhibition and breathe new life into the poems written for that show. N20G member Andy Reeve is running an Art Surgery in The Undercroft on Saturday, June 13 from 12noon to 5pm.

He will be offering advice on art education and related matters. Andy explained: Are you thinking of going to Art School? Do you worry about qualifications, finance, portfolio preparation?

Head to The Undercroft on June 13 for a chat and I will answer your questions. N20G is returning to Norwich Theatre Royal for an exhibition curated by Sarah Cannell, opening on July 22, featuring smaller works on paper. N20G was founded in 1944 by Walter Thomas Watling, art master at CNS, supported by Aileen Law, art teacher at Blyth School and 12 other local artists.

Stimulated by contemporary art movements, they wanted to raise standards of local professional art to something worthy of Norfolk s artistic history. N20G now has more than 80 members from across Norfolk. All aspects of the practice of contemporary fine art are represented, sculpture, print, photography, painting, digital media and installation.

Over the years N20G has included nationally known artists, for example, Michael Andrews, Bernard Reynolds, Edward Barker, Leslie Davenport, Mary Newcomb, Jeffery Camp RA, and Cavendish Morton. Many current and past members have received patronage, exhibited at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition and Galleries in East Anglia, London and internationally, with works in both private and public collections. Some have received prestigious awards, including election to the Royal Academy.

N20G has strong links with Norwich s twin cities and has held joint exhibitions with Novi Sad, Rouen, Koblenz and El Viejo. * Every year, up to four graduates from Norwich University of the Arts are invited to become licentiate members, and exhibit with the group for 12 months, after which they are eligible to be elected as full members.

advert Related References ^ www.norwich20group.co.uk (www.norwich20group.co.uk) ^ www.norwichcentre.org (www.norwichcentre.org) ^ http://nepalinneed.org (nepalinneed.org)

From the Desk of the Shades of Norwich Storytellers: The Acle …

The Acle Straight Regency This easterly stretch of the city is heavily industrialised, containing one of the city s power stations as well as the remnants of Norwich s once sizeable manufacturing base. The area has taken a major hit over the last few decades as businesses have moved overseas, leaving the area an impoverished shadow of its former self. The Regency is governed by Nemo, a Mekhet of the Circle of the Crone.

Geography Located in the eastern side of the city, it borders on the Great Yarmouth docks. The drained lands of what were once the Broads form the majority of this Regency, and it has expanded to include the towns of Acle and Reedham among others. To the north of the Regency is an area of wetland that is protected as a nature reserve by both the human and Kindred authorities.

History Once the industrial heart and centre of much of the city s wealth, the Acle Straight area has been in decline since the 1960s. The assorted chemical plants around Reedham give a high-tech first impression of the area, but urban decay has set in across the rest of the Regency. There s been talk about projects to renew the area on and off for the last decade or so, but nothing has been done on that front to date.

Living in This Regency Nemo has the Mask of the Faceless God, an identity which acts as a vessel for divinity, of whatever kind the cult of Circle they are working with worships. They are rumoured to have an extensive group of mortal, ghoul and Kindred followers who focus on the Cult of the Faceless God – a doctrine focused on mutability of the self. Nemo oversees and draws together the various small cults of the Circle within the Acle Straight Regency, making it the last remaining stronghold for the Circle of the Crone in Norwich.

Nemo s relationship with their clan is strained, as the Mask of the Faceless God and its mutable identity are the antithesis of the kind of solid anchoring identity and sense of self most Mekhet desperately seek. However, Nemo is deeply respected by the Circle for the services they provide, and Mekhet Acolytes in particular know just how much Nemo gives up in service to the gods. Nemo has a distant and hands-off style of governorship over their Regency.

While they are often seen walking the streets, it s rare that they will stop and interact with their tenants. However, the two laws they enforce without mercy are: Do not destroy, damage, deface or desecrate symbols of faith. Do not frenzy on holy ground.

These are met with swift punishments levied in the form of blood sacrifices, hefty fines or beatings. Districts Reedham Chemicals The assorted Reedham chemical plants cover a sizeable area, producing a range of chemicals for the city and beyond. It s one of the few well maintained parts of this area of the city, although far from picturesque.

The assorted towers and chimneys of the plants dominate the skyline, towering over the plant worker s homes and the few shops that serve them. Baron Jack Snagsby rules the District, although he plays things quite fast and loose. Rumour has it that he s not in one of the more favourable Nosferatu Regencies due to some dodgy dealings in the past.

Whatever the truth, Jack has made a made himself at home in Reedham, and is happy to meet with his tenants in the faux-plush office he s set up. A lot of chemicals come out of Reedham, and not all of them are legitimate. If you want to buy meth or an assortment of party drugs in bulk, there are people who can hook you up…

Physical: Access 0, Safety +2. There are few commuters to the plant, with most of the workers living in the immediate area or the nearby Burgh Castle housing projects. As such, the main traffic on the roads and rails in the area are delivering raw materials to the plants, or shipping finished products away to the rest of the city and beyond.

The area is well patrolled by security guards, and both the police and fire departments respond quickly to any disturbance given the highly volatile nature of the chemicals held on site. Mental: Information 2, Awareness +3. The area isn t set up with visitors in mind, so there s little in the way of signposts beyond some stern warnings about trespassing when you get to the plants themselves.

CCTV is pretty prevalent in the area, and the residents are quicker to call in any suspicious behaviour than in most part of the city. Social: Prestige 1, Stability +3. No-one really wants to live here, but it s a better option than Burgh Castle if you ve got the choice.

However, the residents form a close-knit community as workplace friendships carry over into the home. Downtime Hunting Quality: Sparse (2 Vitae) Available Feeding Ground dots: 2 Acle Industrial Dozens of factory buildings fill this district, ranging from early 1900s construction to angular late 1960 s architecture. Most are now derelict, with broken windows and collapsing roofs.

The few active factories churn out goods for the city day and night, with a steady traffic of shift workers flowing in and out of the area. Acle Industrial is ruled by Baron Tarvos Smith, a Daeva of the Circle of the Crone. Baron Smith is known as a supporter of the Trade Unions that grew from the industry in this District and there are rumours that he has formed a cult that worships a divine Smith figure.

He has a reputation for having ferocious strength, even for one of his clan, and a temper to match. The desperate and poor can find homes here, although it s a dangerous place to live. There s little in the way of shops and services other than a few 24-hour diners to feed the workforce and more than its fair share of dive bars for those looking to drown their sorrows.

Physical: Access +1, Safety -3. It s easy to get in and out of the area, with the stretch of the Acle Straight leading between the centre of Norwich and the Great Yarmouth docks. However, once you move away from the A47 it turns into a maze of minor streets leading to the factories, with the street lighting flickering dimly in the night.

Street crime is rife here, and at least one of the bars will erupt into a brawl on any given night as tension rise. Mental: Information -2, Awareness -4. If you work here, you know your way around.

Otherwise, there s little information to be had, with the city mostly trying to avoid paying any attention to the bedraggled remnants of its once great industrial heart. The workers and residents have been worn down by years of fear and neglect, and walk head down swiftly past any but the most serious disturbance. Social: Prestige -2, Stability -3.

As the fortunes of the area have faded, so too has its reputation. Murals speaking of the once innovative and optimistic spirit of the area can still be faintly seen under the grime and neglect of the last thirty years. Any sense of community has faded with it, to the extent that the remaining residents eye each other with suspicion.

Downtime Hunting Quality: Abundant (4 Vitae) Available Feeding Ground dots: 4 Broadland Power The twin gas and coal Broadland Power Plants struggle to keep up with the demands of the city. The concrete towers were state of the art when they were built in the early 1960s to meet the city s growing demand for electricity. Now they are stained with decades of pollution, and the rusty chain-link fences that surround the plants offer little in the way of a barrier to any intruder other than the risk of tetanus.

While publically running smoothly, a lot of effort has been put into covering up the several accidents that have taken place over the last few years Baron Arianrhod, a Gangrel of the Circle of the Crone rules this area. She s a fairly solitary Circle who worships Taranis, and seems to regard the power plants as a place closer to the gods. People generally give her a wide birth, although the few Kindred who live in the shadow of the power stations find her a fair if distant landlord.

Physical: Access 2, Safety -1. The narrow roads leading to the plant are barely adequate for the industrial traffic that rumbles along them. The security for the plans is outdated and the fences nearly rusted through, but a few particularly dedicated NMPS officers take time to patrol around the area.

More than a few Danger! High Voltage signs have fallen into the marshy ground surrounding the plants, making trespassing a somewhat risky endeavour. Mental: Information -2, Awareness 2.

Outdated technology and management cover-ups are the order of the day here. The plants employees are focused on trying to keep the failing plants running and have little time to spare to pay attention to people who don t belong. Social: Prestige -1, Stability 0.

No-one really cares about the plants, as long as they re working, and there s a lot of effort put in to keep the appearance that all is well. Downtime Hunting Quality: Sparse (2 Vitae) Available Feeding Ground dots: 1 Burgh Castle Burgh Castle is not a nice place to live. Anyone who can live somewhere else does, but it s the cheapest part of the city to call your home.

Boarded up shops sit next to crumbling tenement blocks, and at night the sounds of the docks and trains echo across the area. There s little in the way of a police presence, and drug dealers openly do business on the street corners. Burgh Castle is ruled by Evan Draper, a Nosferatu of the Carthian Movement.

He owns a lot of property in the area, wringing rent out of his human tenants and offering Feeding Ground to the Kindred at a very reasonable rate. Feeding isn t hard in the area, and you re unlikely to be disturbed while preying on the residents. Evan hosts a good number of Carthian meetings as this is fairly neutral ground (by virtue of its Circle Regent) and it s a place where the higher ups are unlikely to have agents.

Plus the local Kindred usually control their herds fairly well. For those in the know in the Movement, Evan s seen as a slightly dodgy neutral party – no-one trusts him but his interests are divided enough between various interests that he can t afford to take sides. As such, he s often called on to settle disputes, although he always has an eye towards how he can profit from any such exchange.

Physical: Access 0, Safety 3. The buses stop running early out to this side of the city, but the trains are still there. That said, no-one visits if they can avoid it.

Burgh Castle is a hot spot for burglaries, muggings and street crime, and those who can afford them have hefty locks on their doors and bars on their windows. Mental: Information +2, Awareness 3. If you re in with the right crowd, this is a good place to hear the word on the street.

People tend to keep their head down and keep walking, pausing only for things that directly affect them. Social: Prestige 4, Stability 3. No-one wants to live in Burgh Castle, and the number of boarded up shops and empty houses is testament to that fact.

People who live here are too scared to pull together, and the gangs in the area exist in a state of near open warfare with each over over a street or two of turf. Downtime Hunting Quality: Abundant (4 Vitae) Available Feeding Ground dots: 5 The Encampments The Encampments District is ruled by Janis, a Daeva of the Carthian Movement. The Encampments is an area on the very outskirts of the city, where homeless people and transients gather under bridges and beside train tracks.

It is a scrubby area of industrial land that provides small shelter for the desperate, but it is their best chance of survival. The police periodically clear the Encampments but they always flock back when the police have gone, encouraged by Baron Janis. After all, they’ve got nowhere else to go…

Physical: Access -3, Safety -3. This District is not restricted, but finding your way around it is difficult. It has extremely limited transport, because no-one comes out here if they can avoid it.

The police largely turn a blind eye to what happens here until they need to look like they re doing something. If bad things happen here, they don t get reported for weeks, if at all. The people here know nobody will listen.

But for the most part the locals are not violent – they just want to get on with their lives, and are unlikely to bother you unless you bother them. Mental: Information -2, Awareness +3. It s difficult to get people round here to talk.

They aren’t forthcoming, because they’ve spent years being ignored or berated. However, there are some sources of information if you know who to ask – and you can compensate them appropriately. No-one wants to come a cropper for telling someone something they shouldn’t have, but you can guarantee that whatever goes on in this District, it is witnessed.

Social: Prestige -4, Stability +2. It is not a good thing to live here: if you can, go somewhere else. You re marred by association.

However, people who live in such circumstances have a tendency to form groups, because someone to rely on and trust is important here.

They will sometimes even step in to protect one another.

Downtime Hunting Quality: Abundant (4 Vitae) Available Feeding Ground dots: 2

Update: Police warning as windy weather, with …

21:32 10 January 2015 Ian Clarke 1 Flood warnings have been issued for Lowestoft and other areas around the coast Archant Communities around the East Anglian coast are on standby for possible flooding tonight. The Environment Agency has issued 18 flood warnings for the Anglian region – which indicate that flooding is expected – and 12 of the less serious flood alerts due to expected high tides and a tidal surge. Lowestoft appears to be potentially the worst affected with high water at 12.10am.

The town s Weather Warnings Twitter feed posted: Currently the tide level is 3,48m and should be 1.8m at this time. At Wells, harbourmaster Robert Smith tweeted: High water has peaked, approx one metre above predicted height. Fortunately flow slowed early.

We can relax now. Areas which have a flood warning include tidal River Bure from Scare Gap to Acle Bridge, the tidal River Waveney, the tidal River Yare from Trowse Newton to Breydon Water and Cantley, Brundall and Reedham, the tidal River Wang, Benacre Marshes and Kessingland Beach, Walberswick, Dunwich and surrounding marshes, Southwold and surrounding marshes, Oulton Broad near Mutford Lock, the west bank of the River Yare at Great Yarmouth from Gorleston to Ferry Hill, the North Bank of Lake Lothing, the Rivers Yare and Bure from Runham Vauxhall to Scare Gap and including the Vauxhall Holiday Park, Lowestoft Seafront and Docks, Blythburgh and marshes upstream of the A12, Snape, Iken and the surrounding marshland. Local people can ring Floodline on 0345 9881188 or visit the website www.environmentagency.gov.uk for more information, Meanwhile, windy weather, with gusts of up to 58mph on the Norfolk coast, has brought down trees overnight and caused power cuts.

Two fallen trees blocked the A1062 between Horning and Hoveton and a farmer was out early to remove a tree which had fallen on Barnham Broom Road, between Youngmans Road and Kimberley Hall gates, just outside Wymondham. The tree was removed by 8am. Organisers of the Blickling Parkrun took the decision to cancel the event due to the high winds.

Almost 2,000 homes and businesses were left without power in the Dereham and Scarning area after an overhead power line pole came down. Those without power including homes in the Theatre Street and Commercial Road area and the town s main Post Office. A UK Power Networks spokesman said they had restored power to 1,841 customers leaving 124 still off supply.

He said: Our engineers are doing all they can to these remaining customers back on supply as quickly as we can. Elsewhere, due to a fault in the Watton area at about 9.16am, 33 customers were without power. Another 1,500 homes in the Horsford area were also affected, where 55 customers are still without power.

A total of 66 homes in Cringleford and 149 in the Salhouse area are also without power. Passengers were warned to expect delays and alterations to services on the X1 and Anglian 7 due to the weather. Norfolk Police tweeted: We are receiving many tree down related calls due to high winds.

Please be careful on the roads. Across East Anglia, gusts of 58mph were experienced at Weybourne, 53mph at Wittering, 52mph in Bedford, 49mph at Marham and 47mph at Wattisham. Jim Bacon, forecaster at Norwich s Weatherquest, said winds were due to die down.

He said temperatures had been very mild at around 12 to 13 degrees Celsius, when the average for this time of year is around six degrees. He added: The mild windy weather will be replaced by colder, brighter weather and winds will ease down and be a bit less damaging. It will be a breezy day tomorrow, not as a windy as today, but colder.

It turns mild and cloudy on Monday, windy in the morning with some patches of rain and getting a little bit drier in the afternoon. Meanwhile, elsewhere in Britain thousands of people remain without power after gale force winds brought another day of disruption to the transport and power networks. In Scotland, where winds reached up to 113mph yesterday, some homes in the very north of the country have been without electricity since Friday.

Engineers have been working in treacherous and worsening conditions to reconnect properties, while charity workers from the Red Cross have been working to reach vulnerable people and provide food, accommodation and generators where possible. At the height of the problems, more than 100,000 properties were without power. Around 16,000 are still cut off and engineers said they will work through the night if it is safe to do so.

Some parts of the Highlands and Western Isles are likely to be without power overnight, Scottish and Southern Energy said. In England, a body has been recovered and searches are to continue for another man after two people were swept out to sea in severe weather at Brighton beach. The body of Freddie Reynolds, who was swept out to sea as he tried to rescue his friend Dan Nicholls, has been recovered.

Searches for Mr Nicholls are to continue tomorrow. A driver died in a one-car crash in Aberdeenshire where weather has been causing problems and police are investigating if it was a factor. Two people were also taken to hospital after a car crashed with a gritter in South Ayrshire.

Weather warnings remain in place for tomorrow with further strong winds, snow and ice forecast. The Met Office has yellow be aware weather alerts in place for all of Scotland, the North and Midlands of England, and Northern Ireland until midday tomorrow for snow and ice. Wind warnings are in force in places until this evening.

Efforts to recover the beached Hoegh Osaka near Southampton had to be postponed due to high winds, which have also caused severe problems on roads in Yorkshire and the North East of England as a number of lorries were blown over, blocking carriageways. A gust of 113mph was recorded at Stornoway on Lewis yesterday, the strongest since records at that site began in 1970, while winds of 76mph were recorded at High Bradfield, in South Yorkshire, and in Aberdaron, Gwynedd. The areas worst affected by power cuts are Buchan, Dingwall, Dunoon, Elgin, Fort William, Inverness-shire, Oban, Perth, Shetland, Skye, the Western Isles and Wick.

As well as the Red Cross, local food suppliers have been helping to reach those cut off. Scottish Hydro praised a chip shop in the Highlands for helping with food. The power company tweeted: Big shout out to the team in McGinty s chip shop in Fortrose who are delivering hot food to elderly vulnerable customers.

Alan Broadbent, director of engineering, said: I would like to praise the work of our men and women out in the field who had to put up with some of the worst weather conditions I have ever encountered. If it is safe to do so, they will continue to work through the night. I would also like to thank our customers for their patience and understanding.

My apologies, once again, for the disruption they had to endure since yesterday. The bad weather has toppled power lines and uprooted trees, and yesterday forced ScotRail temporarily to suspend all train services for safety reasons. The Sunderland Empire had to close and cancel tonight s performance after a well-known statue on its roof toppled over and was left hanging from its base, 90ft up.

Met Office forecaster Alex Burkill said: In the north of the UK, the wintry showers should push more eastwards and we should see most of them easing on Sunday. The South East should hold on to the largely fine conditions but we will see showers push into Wales and south west England, some of this falling as sleet and snow over the moors but also to lower levels. The ferocious gales were stirred up by an extra-powerful jet stream triggered by plunging temperatures in the United States hitting warmer air in the south.

References ^ Ian Clarke (www.derehamtimes.co.uk)

Update: Police warning as windy weather, with gusts of up to 58mph …

08:04 11 January 2015 Ian Clarke 1 Flood warnings have been issued for Lowestoft and other areas around the coast Archant Communities around the East Anglian coast are today assessing the impact of flooding after a night of high tides. The Environment Agency still has 18 flood warnings for the Anglian region in place – which indicate that flooding is expected – and 12 of the less serious flood alerts due to expected high tides and a tidal surge. An Environment Agency spokesman said conditions were rapidly improving and the water levels had not been as high as expected.

He said the flood warnings were likely to be lifted soon. There have been no major amounts of flooding and fortunately the high tides did not coincide with strong winds. There have been reports of some flooding problems at Walberswick, Oulton Broad, Southwold, Kirkley and Gorleston.

The highest tides were between 8pm and 1am. At Lowestoft, the Weather Warnings Twitter feed posted: We would like to thank everyone for keeping us updated through this flood scare. High tide has passed and hopefully will recede so danger is subsiding.

A spokesman for the voluhtary group NS 4×4 Response said: The tide last night passed without significant incidents. At Wells, harbourmaster Robert Smith tweeted: High water has peaked, approx one metre above predicted height. Fortunately flow slowed early.

We can relax now. Areas which have a flood warning include tidal River Bure from Scare Gap to Acle Bridge, the tidal River Waveney, the tidal River Yare from Trowse Newton to Breydon Water and Cantley, Brundall and Reedham, the tidal River Wang, Benacre Marshes and Kessingland Beach, Walberswick, Dunwich and surrounding marshes, Southwold and surrounding marshes, Oulton Broad near Mutford Lock, the west bank of the River Yare at Great Yarmouth from Gorleston to Ferry Hill, the North Bank of Lake Lothing, the Rivers Yare and Bure from Runham Vauxhall to Scare Gap and including the Vauxhall Holiday Park, Lowestoft Seafront and Docks, Blythburgh and marshes upstream of the A12, Snape, Iken and the surrounding marshland. Local people can ring Floodline on 0345 9881188 or visit the website www.environmentagency.gov.uk for more information, Meanwhile, windy weather, with gusts of up to 58mph on the Norfolk coast, brought down trees overnight and caused power cuts on Saturday.

Two fallen trees blocked the A1062 between Horning and Hoveton and a farmer was out early to remove a tree which had fallen on Barnham Broom Road, between Youngmans Road and Kimberley Hall gates, just outside Wymondham. The tree was removed by 8am. Organisers of the Blickling Parkrun took the decision to cancel the event due to the high winds.

Almost 2,000 homes and businesses were left without power in the Dereham and Scarning area after an overhead power line pole came down. Those without power including homes in the Theatre Street and Commercial Road area and the town s main Post Office. There were also power cuts affecting hundreds of people in Watton, Horsford, Cringleford and Salhouse.

Passengers were warned to expect delays and alterations to services on the X1 and Anglian 7 due to the weather. Norfolk Police tweeted: We are receiving many tree down related calls due to high winds. Please be careful on the roads.

Across East Anglia, gusts of 58mph were experienced at Weybourne, 53mph at Wittering, 52mph in Bedford, 49mph at Marham and 47mph at Wattisham. Jim Bacon, forecaster at Norwich s Weatherquest, said winds had died down. He said temperatures had been very mild at around 12 to 13 degrees Celsius, when the average for this time of year is around six degrees.

He added: It will be a breezy day on Sunday, but not as a windy as Saturday, but colder. It turns mild and cloudy on Monday, windy in the morning with some patches of rain and getting a little bit drier in the afternoon. Meanwhile, elsewhere in Britain thousands of people remain without power after gale force winds brought another day of disruption to the transport and power networks.

In Scotland, where winds reached up to 113mph, some homes in the very north of the country have been without electricity since Friday. Engineers have been working in treacherous and worsening conditions to reconnect properties, while charity workers from the Red Cross have been working to reach vulnerable people and provide food, accommodation and generators where possible. At the height of the problems, more than 100,000 properties were without power.

Around 16,000 are still cut off and engineers said they will work through the night if it is safe to do so. Some parts of the Highlands and Western Isles are likely to be without power overnight, Scottish and Southern Energy said. In England, a body has been recovered and searches are to continue for another man after two people were swept out to sea in severe weather at Brighton beach.

The body of Freddie Reynolds, who was swept out to sea as he tried to rescue his friend Dan Nicholls, has been recovered. Searches for Mr Nicholls are to continue tomorrow. A driver died in a one-car crash in Aberdeenshire where weather has been causing problems and police are investigating if it was a factor.

Two people were also taken to hospital after a car crashed with a gritter in South Ayrshire. Weather warnings remain in place for tomorrow with further strong winds, snow and ice forecast. The Met Office has yellow be aware weather alerts in place for all of Scotland, the North and Midlands of England, and Northern Ireland until midday tomorrow for snow and ice.

Wind warnings are in force in places until this evening. Efforts to recover the beached Hoegh Osaka near Southampton had to be postponed due to high winds, which have also caused severe problems on roads in Yorkshire and the North East of England as a number of lorries were blown over, blocking carriageways. A gust of 113mph was recorded at Stornoway on Lewis yesterday, the strongest since records at that site began in 1970, while winds of 76mph were recorded at High Bradfield, in South Yorkshire, and in Aberdaron, Gwynedd.

The areas worst affected by power cuts are Buchan, Dingwall, Dunoon, Elgin, Fort William, Inverness-shire, Oban, Perth, Shetland, Skye, the Western Isles and Wick. As well as the Red Cross, local food suppliers have been helping to reach those cut off. Scottish Hydro praised a chip shop in the Highlands for helping with food.

The power company tweeted: Big shout out to the team in McGinty s chip shop in Fortrose who are delivering hot food to elderly vulnerable customers. Alan Broadbent, director of engineering, said: I would like to praise the work of our men and women out in the field who had to put up with some of the worst weather conditions I have ever encountered. If it is safe to do so, they will continue to work through the night.

I would also like to thank our customers for their patience and understanding. My apologies, once again, for the disruption they had to endure since yesterday. The bad weather has toppled power lines and uprooted trees, and yesterday forced ScotRail temporarily to suspend all train services for safety reasons.

The Sunderland Empire had to close and cancel tonight s performance after a well-known statue on its roof toppled over and was left hanging from its base, 90ft up. Met Office forecaster Alex Burkill said: In the north of the UK, the wintry showers should push more eastwards and we should see most of them easing on Sunday. The South East should hold on to the largely fine conditions but we will see showers push into Wales and south west England, some of this falling as sleet and snow over the moors but also to lower levels.

The ferocious gales were stirred up by an extra-powerful jet stream triggered by plunging temperatures in the United States hitting warmer air in the south.

References ^ Ian Clarke (www.derehamtimes.co.uk)