Category: Burnham Thorpe

Reference Library – Burnham Thorpe

Retirement Homes Burnham Thorpe Norfolk – Find Homes for the …

Retirement Homes Burnham Thorpe Norfolk – Find Homes for the …

Dressed in a hunting suit, I arrived at the Holkham estate near Burnham Thorpe, Norfolk, where this picture was taken by which is near the Queen s Sandringham home, dismissed the claim. He said: It may be a large domestic cat owned by someone town, such as The Bircham Gallery in Holt, or the Fairfax Gallery in Burnham Market. You can boat around the Norfolk Broads, a hundred square miles of Property for sale in Burnham Market with the UK’s leading online Property Retirement No preference Open House estate agents are delighted to offer this spacious 4 bedroom Semi-detached house located in a desirable village of burnham market just a few .

Creake Road, Burnham Market, King’s Lynn, Norfolk PE31. Admiral Lord Nelson reaches his 250th birthday 1 To mark the 250th anniversary, many different celebrations were held in his home town of Burnham Thorpe, west Norfolk over the weekend of the 27 and 28 September. The Lord Nelson pub hosted an array of activities including a feast on Sunday, 27 Retirement Homes Groby Leicestershire 2 The police and the Crown Prosecution Service were also criticised for failing to arrest Lord Janner, search his home and interview him in was A Grade II star listed home on the edge of Norwich was top of 10 highest priced homes to sell in Norfolk in September.

Thorpe Old Hall Coming a close second was The Malt House in Burnham Overy Staithe, boasting a fantastic view, which sold for 1 Retirement Homes Brighstone Isle Of Wight 3 The great-grandmother, who was born in the year the Wright brothers invented the first successful aeroplane, will celebrate with family and friends from across the Find 2 bedroom houses for sale in Burnham Market, King’s Lynn, Norfolk. Search over 900000 properties for sale from the top estate agents and developers in Retirement Property & Retirement Home Directory for elderly care and retirement in the UK. fifty5plus.com currently lists Retirement Property & Retirement Homes for Leading directory of Retirement homes & sheltered housing in Dersingham, Kings Lynn and West Norfolk, Norfolk, covering local Retirement homes & sheltered housing in local places: Boston, Burnham Market, Dersingham, Downham Retirement Homes Torquay Devon 4 Find retirement property for sale in Torquay, Devon.

Search over 900,000 properties for sale from the top estate agents and developers in the UK Dec 23, 2015 Find property to rent in Burnham Market, King’s Lynn, Norfolk. Search over 250000 properties to rent from the top lettings agents in the UK Rightmove. Garden (1) Parking (2).

Retirement properties: Non-retirement (2) The medallions were a goodbye present to the family, who moved back to their Surrey home at the Burnham Thorpe rectory. His father was rector for All Saints Church. The war hero was one of 11 children and was born in the north Norfolk village Find new homes for sale in Norfolk RightmoveFind new homes and developments for sale in Norfolk.

Search over 60000 properties for 5 bedroom detached house for sale Burnham Market new property for sale in Burnham Market New home ..

Retirement properties: Retirement (6) Nursing homes and residential homes providing care for the elderly in the United Kingdom He has bought a Georgian manor house in Burnham Thorpe, Norfolk, from the Earl of Leicester s nonagenarian He never realised he d be so busy when he bought his retirement home.

Bond author Ian Fleming spent his final 11 years living in a early Retirement Property for sale: Secure serviced accommodation; Retirement Housing and Sheltered Housing, Assisted Living References ^ Admiral Lord Nelson reaches his 250th birthday (www.bbc.co.uk) ^ Retirement Homes Groby Leicestershire (erel.xyz) ^ Retirement Homes Brighstone Isle Of Wight (erel.xyz) ^ Retirement Homes Torquay Devon (erel.xyz)

I'll think of something later: Norfolk Churches 150-166: Cromer to …

I'll think of something later: Norfolk Churches 150-166: Cromer to …

The first of our annual September walks to raise money for the Norfolk Churches Trust back in 2002 focused on the area around where our cicerona Jill’s mother lived, Burnham Thorpe. Since then Jill’s Norfolk bases have been King’s Lynn and now Southrepps, where her moving-in coincided with an astonishingly good August festival 1 featuring top young musicians I’d met earlier in the summer. The plan this time – executed in full despite poor prognostication of the weather – was to cover 16 churches and chapels in 18 miles.

The Friday, when we travelled, was hot and sunny; Saturday, the scheduled day of the walk was scheduled to be wet until at least mid-afternoon. We persuaded Jill that we could do half of it in sunshine and the other half later on Saturday. But this plan was kiboshed – serendipitously, as it turned out – by the second of several carelessnesses which marked the long weekend: at Norwich we went straight to what looked like the platform where the branch line to Gunton and Cromer has its terminus.

Or so we thought until the familiar-looking two-carriage train left five minutes earlier, and as we moved off we saw there was another platform further up to the left where the one we should have caught was sitting. So we got out at the first stop on the way to Great Yarmouth heading east rather than north, Brundall Gardens, and found out that the next train back to Norwich was in precisely an hour. Phoned Jill, who had to drive a long way to pick us up, and had the chance of exploring two more churches I suppose I could have added to the list.

The first was petite St Lawrence Brundall, with its 13th century double bellcote, its lead font and a 16th century roundel of the gridironed saint. The second was hugely impressive and, along with Trunch, the glory of the weekend, St Andrew and St Peter Blofield. Chief of its delights are a tall tower, a stupendous octagonal font with carved scenes from the life of Christ, and some fascinating 1930s windows in memory of local benefactor Margaret Harker, including a scene of fisher girls working at Great Yarmouth.

My own photos of all these treasures and of the day of the walk itself – which turned out absolutely fine much earlier than originally forecast, clear by noon – are lost along with my precious Nokia (precious inasmuch as there were other pictures I hadn’t downloaded). The hope of its turning up has been the reason for delay in posting here. I’m hugely grateful to our fourth regular walking companion, Cally Brooke Johnson, for most of the shots featured here; I hope she’ll forgive me for having fiddled around with them.

Her first contribution is of the main temple in Cromer, Britain’s best pier according to some poll our other, which we reached by train from Gunton. We ticked off four chapels in the rain – one with boarded-up windows in the ‘new’ cemetery to the south, the one belonging to the Methodists who gave us a warm welcome as they always do, one converted into Cromer’s impressive library, and a red-brick Baptist place of worship in the High Street. But the obvious religious high point, in more ways than one owing to its tower (record-breaking for Norfolk), is St Peter and St Paul.

This snap courtesy of Discover Norfolk . A busy coffee morning was in full swing inside, and I’m grateful to the kindness of the local ladies; walking backwards to snap the very odd west window with its bleeding greens, I fell over a step and bruised my spine. By this stage my three companions had exited.

The ladies came rushing, sat me down, gave me a coffee and offered me some cake. Pevsner calls the interior ‘a little disappointing’ after the external display, but I liked its height and light. The angel roof is Victorian, but splendid.

The best glass is workshop of William Morris, c.1874, with fine angels and prophets. Since I’ve had no reply yet to my call for help from Simon Nott, whose Norfolk Churches site always has the most comprehensive images of every church he’s visited, I settled for this one of the lower panels (note the fine angels) posted on Twitter by Caroline Arscott. As I don’t do Twitter, I couldn’t ask her permission, but I hope she doesn’t mind.

Two of the parishioners told me not to miss the early 20th century Catholic church on the road to Overstrand. That meant walking along a road rather than a bit of coastline, but the building’s woody, airy interior was worth seeing. Overstrand itself turned out to be quite a religious centre, owing to the Christian Endeavour holiday home lodged within one of three Lutyens buildings in the village.

On the way we saw St Martin, ruinous in the 18th century and well restored in the early 20th. St Martin’s one curiosity, not mentioned by Pevsner, is the bread oven in the bell tower. The curious unfolded in abundance when we walked up the drive of the aforementioned CE home, the Pleasaunce.

It’s an awkward conjoining of two villas into one home for Lord Battersea, the Liberal MP, and his Jewish (Rothschild) wife, a much-loved philanthropist. The family coat of arms, splendid in itself, is somewhat out of proportion to the rest of the facade, worked on by Lutyens in 1897-9, but here I’ve taken Cal’s picture and focused in on it. The motto is ‘God tendeth the flowers’ – ‘not, we hope’, says the guide by Monica E Sykes, ‘a pun on the family name’, but why not?

Opposite are the stables with a massy tower that seems in harmony with the marine surroundings. Just beyond the porch is one of the Moroccan doors Lord Battersea brought back from his travels, looking good against a background of (I presume) William De Morgan tiles. We had the CE man in charge’s permission to wander the grounds.

The present planting has little to do with Gertrude Jekyll’s work alongside Lutyens, though the outlines of the circuar sunken garden remain, and the so-called ‘cloisters’ are rather monstrous but presumably a nice shady spot to sit in the heat of summer. Although it’s not consecrated, we thought we could claim the chapel into which the rather charming gatehouse was converted, with its odd little homage to Palladio inside (no shots from Cal to give a good impression of the interior, sadly). Returning on Sunday, we tried to see another Lutyens building, Overstrand Hall, but were warned off at the security intercom by the gates.

Lutyens’ only Nonconformist design, the Methodist Church of 1898, is, as Pevsner says, ‘a very curious design’, at least in its clerestory with its ten lunette windows, four of which you can see here.. The ladies inside were predictably delightful, and seemingly grateful that their Sunday congregation of nine sometimes got bulked up by the Christian visitors from The Pleasaunce. Bliss it was to be in Overstrand at lunchtime, because the crab and lobster shack was open and we had lashings of both, probably the best and certainly the freshest I’ve ever tasted, in the little yard at the back.

I had some rather detailed shots of the fare, all lost; there’s the Lumix camera sitting on the table beside me as a sad reminder. More walking frustratingly close to the coast led us to the real charmer of a church at Sidestrand, moved inland in 1880 from a site now eaten away by the sea. The tower counts in the list of round-tower pursuers – we saw their logo – despite the octagonal upper part.

The inside was so harmonious, making good use of Jacobean panelling. No shot of that, so – having dropped our plan to make an inland detour to St Mary Northrepps, which we saw the next day, in a lovely situation but with nothing to impress inside – onwards towards the coast, looking back towards Overstrand while here we are making our way along the path to Trimingham, where it hasn’t been eroded. As with the so-called ‘Jurassic coast’ of Dorset, the cliffs are rich in fossils, and the hunters come out in force whenever there’s a landslide, which is often.

I have my own photo of the outside of the Church of St John the Baptist, since we walked here from Southrepps on our first visit (though we saved the interior for this time). Its short west tower and the well-kept, very green churchyard make an attractive ensemble. Strictly this is the Church of the Head of John the Baptist (San Giovanni Decollato), because one such stone reproduction provided a point of pilgrimage on the way to Walsingham; where the head has gone I’m not quite sure.

Jokanaan’s face does feature in a tiny detail of the c.1500 rood screen with its eight saints. Cally didn’t snap that, but here are four of them; note the dragon and beast detail above in the second picture. We now retraced our summer steps up to a point by heading inland across the mildly hilly country no-one seems to associate with Norfolk – not so ‘very flat’, pace Coward – and after some miles passed a fine old mill to reach All Saints Gimingham.

It looks alluring flanked by trees across a field in the late afternoon light but apart from its font and a couple of benchends didn’t have much to say for itself. There was no-one to sign our forms, and – worse – no refreshment, a black mark, though it seems that everyone was up the road at Trunch preparing for the concert to be led by the vicar as part of a folk band. So we moved swiftly on in the hope of finding St Botolph’s open after 5, which of course it was.

And yes, the best of the churches came last. Trunch’s treasure in the centre of a triangle which is part village green, notes Pevsner, ‘will always remain in one’s mind as the church with the font canopy. There is however much else to be enjoyed’.

There certainly is: a fine rood screen of 1502 with much of the original colouring which fits into the lofty early Perpendicular whole very beautifully, fine stalls with misericords and imaginative benchends, their backs now up against the screen and a fine hammerbeam roof with angels. The font itself, of 1350, can easily be overlooked, given the glory all around it, which dates, like the rood screen, from half a century earlier.. The cover is one of what Pevsner cites as only four in England, locating the others are in Norwich’s St Peter Mancroft, Luton and Durham Cathedral, though I’m sure the unique font cover we saw in Terrington St Clement 2 with its 17th century Flemish paintings ough to count.

It seems astonishing that such a treasure of carving in oak is accessible to all within a much-visited church. The eight posts are decorated with vine, lily, thistle and the odd bird and beast – very odd in the case of the monkey holding a crozier, a dig at the vanity of bishops (though of course I praise the one in the Lords who voted against the scale of Osborne’s invidious tax relief proposals). The guide I bought, ‘Trunch Miscellany: A Walk Around Guide’, told us to look for the pig wearing a mitre.

We did, but in vain, for he doesn’t exist, as another guide we saw a bit later confirmed.Anyway, the posts rise up to ‘a fan-like vault with a pendant and very much cusped fields’ (Pevsner) ‘The upper stage has eight big, somewhat heavy, tripartite, hanging vaulted canopies’ (Pevsner again). And, as in the screen, traces of the original painting. With the setting sun lighting up the church tower, we set off on the last, green-lane stage of the walk – always a joy, usually yielding a sunset, though we were too much in trees to catch it entirely.

A barn owl glided and swooped around a field just past the oaktree-framed signpost featured up top (I had a couple of good shots, o Weh!). We didn’t actually reach St James Southrepps until 8.30pm, having freshened up back at Jill’s before walking across the fields in the semi-dark to the excellent pub for supper. Candles lit up the church from within, but here’s a bit more from the first visit: another outside shot to add to the one I put up in the chchugging blog notice 3 , more of the scallops friezed close to the base of the building (only collect with the St James trail starting at the Cathedral in Le Puy 4 ) and the one original fragment of glass.

Sunday morning dawned bright, and stayed so just in time for me to have a dip in the North Sea at Overstrand – childsplay compared to the waters off Fife back in July. I’d have no shame being caught at closer quarters, but the diplo-mate’s usual modesty, though he was fully clothed, forbids anything nearer than this. Then we went and spoiled the uniqueness of Saturday’s crab lunch with more of the same.

I look forward to more of that next year, when we strike out from Southrepps further north-east. I’ve finally written this up as a belated push for more contributions. If you want to help, you know where to find me – or you can always leave a message which I won’t publish and I’ll get back to you.

Previous chronicles: Mileham to Bittering, 2014 5 Beechamwell to Gooderstone, 2013 6 Ingoldisthorpe to Thornham, 2012 7 East Rudham to Helhoughton, 2011 8 Wormegay to Castle Acre, 2010 9 Walpoles to Wiggenhalls, 2009 10 King’s Lynn to Sandringham, 2008 11 Earlier walks back to 2002 BB (Before Blog) References ^ astonishingly good August festival (www.theartsdesk.com) ^ Terrington St Clement (davidnice.blogspot.co.uk) ^ chchugging blog notice (www.davidnice.blogspot.co.uk) ^ Cathedral in Le Puy (www.davidnice.blogspot.co.uk) ^ Mileham to Bittering, 2014 (www.davidnice.blogspot.co.uk) ^ Beechamwell to Gooderstone, 2013 (davidnice.blogspot.co.uk) ^ Ingoldisthorpe to Thornham, 2012 (davidnice.blogspot.co.uk) ^ East Rudham to Helhoughton, 2011 (davidnice.blogspot.co.uk) ^ Wormegay to Castle Acre, 2010 (davidnice.blogspot.co.uk) ^ Walpoles to Wiggenhalls, 2009 (davidnice.blogspot.co.uk) ^ King’s Lynn to Sandringham, 2008 (davidnice.blogspot.co.uk)

Norfolk Parish Records to go Online on TheGenealogist.co.uk …

Norfolk Parish Records to go Online on TheGenealogist.co.uk …

The following announcement was written by the folks at TheGenealogist.co.uk 1 : TheGenealogist and the Norfolk Record Office announce that they have signed an agreement to make Norfolk parish and other historical records available online for the first time. The registers of baptisms, marriages, burials and banns of marriage feature the majority of the parishes in Norfolk. On release the searchable transcripts will be linked to original images of baptism, marriage and burial records from the parish registers of this East Anglian county Some of the surviving records are from the early 1500s These vital records will allow family history researchers from all over the world to search for their Norfolk ancestors online for the first time Famous people that can be found in these records include: Samuel Lincoln, the great-great-great-great-grandfather of Abraham Lincoln, 18th President of the United States of America, can be discovered in the baptismal records of St Andrew, Hingham in Norfolk for the 24th August 1622.

At some point his entry has been highlighted with a star. Samuel Lincoln baptismal record Vice Admiral Horatio Lord Nelson, who lost his life at the Battle of Trafalgar. This impoverished clergyman s son can be discovered in the register for Burnham Thorpe in 1758.

There his father, as rector of the parish, would have officiated at all the baptisms that year in this church with his name appearing at the bottom of the page. Horatio Lord Nelson s baptism record Viewing an image of the actual parish register reveals that the young Horatio Nelson was firstly baptised privately in October 1758, just a week after being born and then given a second public baptism in the middle of November. This practice was carried out for sickly babies who were not expected to survive and begs the question of how different British history would have been had he died as an infant.

Fascinatingly, by looking at the actual image of the page there are some additions to his entry that have been penned in the margin years later. These notes, reputedly to be by his brother the Rev William Nelson, 1st Earl Nelson, celebrated the honours that his brother received in his adult life. He ends it with the latin quote caetera enarret fama which translates as others recount the story .

Burnham Thorpe Church, Norfolk. Horatio Nelson s baptismal place. Photograph: John Salmon In addition to those from the Diocese of Norwich the coverage also includes some Suffolk parishes in and near Lowestoft that fall into the deanery of Lothingland and also, various parishes from the deanery of Fincham and Feltwell, that part of the Diocese of Ely that covers south-west Norfolk.

Nigel Bayley, Managing Director of TheGenealogist said: With this collection you will be able to easily search Norfolk records online for the first time. From the results a click will allow you to view high quality digital images of the original documents. Joining our already extensive Parish Record collection on TheGenealogist, this release will be eagerly anticipated by family and local historians with links to Norfolk Gary Tuson, County Archivist at The Norfolk Record Office said: The Norfolk Record Office is pleased to be working with TheGenealogist, a commercial company helping to make these important records available to a worldwide audience.

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References ^ TheGenealogist.co.uk (TheGenealogist.co.uk) ^ Click here (eogn.com)