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Reference Library – Denver

What is Energy Security?

Definitions and Scenarios

by Evan Hillebrand 1 Energy security is complicated, and multi-dimensional. It goes beyond over-simplified notions of energy self-sufficiency or energy independence . It s about where our energy comes from and its the cost, reliability, sustainability, and scale of our energy use.

Technical, economic, geopolitical and other factors all play a role, and one needs to understand how they interact. Energy security is not just a matter of energy; it s about how energy affects national security. The following contains portions of a podcast produced by The EnergyXchange One can access the audio and/or the transcript of the entire conversation between myself, Guy Caruso, Charles Ebinger, and Jan Mueller at energyx.org.

The discussion below also relies on analysis discussed in Energy, Economic Growth, and Geopolitical Futures 2 (MIT Press, 2015) by Stacy Closson and myself. The argument below represents my interpretation of these two works and does not purport to represent the views of anyone else. A common sense definition of energy security would be access to energy supplies on a timely, affordable, and sustainable basis.

It would also include the ability to respond to emergencies or disruptions, whether they be political or natural causes, in sustaining the ability to respond to energy shortages in whatever form they may occur. This qualitative perspective might be called a resilience-based definition of energy security, focusing on the short term. To think about the long-term and to try to measure energy security quantitatively we could define energy security for a country as energy exports (in volume terms) less energy imports, divided by energy demand.

This gives us a simple ratio that goes up or down depending on domestic production and domestic demand for energy. This ratio was getting much worse for the United States for several decades until a sharp turnaround in the last 5 years, suggesting an improvement in US energy security. A somewhat different and perhaps better definition is net nominal imports over nominal GDP.

The first quantitative definition use energy volumes (in BTUs, for example). The second uses nominal dollar figures so prices are part of the picture too. Under the second definition, even if the volume of energy imports falls, sharply rising prices of those imports could damage our overall economy and our perception of energy security.

Either or both of these measures can be calculated for all countries. My work uses a quantitative model to project these ratios into the future based on alternative assumptions about energy supply and demand, GDP growth, and other factors. Energy security of one country depends not just on these simple ratios, but also on the energy security of other countries.

Even if US energy security increases in the future because of the fracking revolution, the overall US security situation could deteriorate if other countries find themselves in what they perceive as dangerously insecure positions. In Energy, Economic Growth, and Geopolitical Futures we worked through eight scenarios with different plausible assumptions about energy demand and supply and economic growth for 182 countries for forty years. The scenarios were formulated with the help of our colleagues and students at the University of Kentucky and a group of outside advisers.

The quantitative results were developed with the aid of the International Futures Model, created and maintained by Dr. Barry Hughes at the University of Denver. Our starting premise was that more US and global energy production would lead to lower energy prices, less pricing power by OPEC, and less vulnerability to shipping choke points.

It should lead to enhanced US energy security by any of the definitions offered above. This is a nice scenario from the US point of view and in some of our scenarios enhanced US energy production really does lead to improvements in US energy security. But these scenarios assume that energy production is growing everywhere, and GDP growth is strong everywhere or almost everywhere.

In one benign scenario, China s economic growth remains high and the country is assumed to boost energy production and energy efficiency strongly. We also assumed that geopolitics are also moving in a benign direction and China becomes in Robert Zoellick s term a responsible stakeholder. Changing the assumptions about China s energy production and political orientation, however, could drastically affect the US position.

In another scenario we assume Chinese GDP growth is not strong, its energy production and energy efficiency do not grow, and it becomes an aggressive revanchist state rather than a responsible stakeholder. It becomes more and more nervous about its dependence on long energy supply lines from the Persian Gulf and Siberia. We also assumed in this scenario that as the US becomes more energy self-sufficient it disengages to a certain extent from the rest of the world, militarily and politically.

In one scenario, China attacks Russia to seize eastern Siberian oil and gas fields and pipelines. In another, it seizes all of the contested islands in the East and South China seas and establishes military hegemony over the entire region. If force is used to allocate global energy rather than the market everyone s energy security is affected.

Even if the United States remains uninvolved in this fighting, its energy security could be damaged by higher global energy prices and increased uncertainty about cross-border energy flows. In another scenario, improvements in US and global energy production lead to low global prices and lower energy imports but a reduced level of security because of growing turmoil in the Middle East. In this scenario, the US gradually reduces its presence and influence in the Middle East.

Iran, reeling from low oil prices, senses an opportunity. The mullahs demand that the U.S. military withdraw its already depleted forces from the region, that Saudi Arabia and the other Gulf states curtail their oil production, and that all ships passing through the Strait of Hormuz pay high transit fees to Tehran.

The United States and Israel are encouraged by the Saudis to fight, but half the American fleet is incapacitated in the first attempt to force the Strait and the fleet quits the fight altogether after Tel Aviv and Haifa are obliterated in separate nuclear attacks. Iran becomes the regional hegemon. It alone now sets the OPEC production quotas, enforcing its decisions with the threat of military force.

US energy producers are delighted the prices they can charge are higher than otherwise but the US economy suffers. Both my podcast colleagues and Energy, Economic Growth, and Geopolitical Futures worried about the effect of the response to the threat of climate change on energy security. Charles Ebinger stated that if the commitments coming out of the Paris talks are real it means that we are going to see a dramatic move over time away from fossil fuels .

Unless there is a surprising amount of technological change in the production of renewable fuels it is hard to see how this politically-mandated retreat from fossil fuels will not reduce energy security. We constructed an IPCC scenario in our book. We assumed a consensus is reached, at least among the OECD countries, that the fossil-fuel driven economy is environmentally unsustainable and that much higher fuel taxes are the way to proceed even if it means lower economic growth.

Most of the rest of the world declines to follow the OECD example. Rapid increases in the automobile fleets in China and elsewhere, and continuing construction of new coal-fired power plants lead to increased greenhouse gas emissions. Eventually, however, pressure from the West, a growing public awareness of the dangers from climate change, and a series of environmental disasters lead to a growing global willingness to act.

This is a benign scenario in the sense that all, or most, countries, over time, peacefully, comply with the climate change mandates. There is a substantial rise in transfer payments from the OECD to the poorer nations, but economic growth is lower everywhere, and the trend toward income convergence between the OECD and the rest a trend in evidence since the late 20 th century stops. Only a very small reduction in global temperature is noted by 2050 (the last year simulated in our exercise), but larger effects are expected toward the end of the century.

One could say that this IPCC scenario, given all the assumptions about political accord, enhances US and global energy security in the long run. I personally wonder if the economic losses and the short-term disruption are worth it, given the risk. I am skeptical of the catastrophic anthropogenic climate change predicted by the IPCC computer models.

My opinion is based on my years of experience working with large scale models. The IPCC models are not validated in any meaningful sense. They cannot predict the recent past without significant a-theoretical add factors.

They have not forecast the near future for 1995 to 2015 at all well. They have never even attempted to explain the vast changes in climate over the past 500 or 1000 years. My views on the modeling issue, I think, are similar to those of eminent climate scientists such as Richard Lindzen, Judith Curry, and Roger Pielke, Sr.

We put an IPCC scenario in our book because some people who helped us put it together believe in the seriousness of the risk of catastrophic anthropogenic climate change. Many people do. On the other hand, when Dr.

Closson and I talk to audiences about our book and we present the scenario based on these climate assumptions and the political response to the perceived threat, the IPCC scenario is always rated the least likely of the eight we present even less likely than the nuclear attack on Tel Aviv because most people don t believe the underlying assumptions are very realistic.

JC note: As with all guest posts, please keep your comments civil and relevant References ^ Evan Hillebrand (www.uky.edu) ^ Energy, Economic Growth, and Geopolitical Futures (www.amazon.com)

Norfolk family looks for answers after military vet's killing

Please enable Javascript to watch this video Norfolk, Va. — Sophia Gervasio says she always looked up to her dad Isaac, but the 15-year old is now growing up without him. “He’s always been my hero,” she said. “I lost my hero.” Isaac was shot and killed in November on Denver Avenue 1 , just a few blocks from his home. Police called it a case of road rage, but haven’t gotten more specific as to exactly what happened. His wife Jessica saw the police lights that night.

She didn’t know it was her husband. “None of us were prepared for that night,” Jessica said. “It was just a normal Friday night.” Gervasio served in the Navy and Air Force reserves, according to his wife. He had gotten back from deployment to Afghanistan last spring. “It was his life,” she said. “All we wanted to do was just retire from the military.” More than three months since he was killed police haven’t made any arrests. “It makes it very hard knowing that there’s somebody out there thinking that they got away with murder,” Jessica said. What is helping is knowing that Isaac is saving others, even after his death.

He was an organ and tissue donor, and dozens are benefiting. “My husband was a hero in life and in death he saved 33 lives. My husband was a hero,” said Jessica. Anyone who can help give the family closure is asked to call the crime line 1-888-LOCK-U-UP.

His parents, who live in California, wrote a statement. They want answers in their son’s death: To some, the passing of the last 92 days have been seamless, Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years, some birthdays; however, for the Gervasio and Batty families, especially for Jessica, Sophia, Vinciente and Raphael it has been a nightmare, relived each day and night. On November 13, Issac Gervasio, husband, father, brother and son was gunned down in the street over a simple traffic disagreement.

We have fought through tears, pain and confusion try to come to grips with Issacs murder. How am I to rationalize the brutality of the event? Sorry, it s impossible, our disbelief and grief is so strong, rational thinking at this time is irrational.

My brother a veteran of the US Navy/Air Force was a giving man, a man who would stop what he was doing to help anyone in need. You didn t even have to ask for help he just knew and would show up at your door with tools and supplies ready to help out. While deployed to Afganistan last year, he called home every Sunday morning to remind everyone be ready for church.

He did Facetime with his family in the evenings. He was like a father to all the kids in the neighborhood. He loved life and gave all to all.

We implore anyone who has information to please contact the Norfolk Police department, let s put the monster who took Isaac s life where he belongs.

All we ask is Justice for Isaac. –Dieter and Amy Batty (as read to NewsChannel 3 by Nick Batty) References ^ Isaac was shot and killed in November on Denver Avenue (wtkr.com)

Acel Moore, Icon and Pioneer, Dies at 75

Saturday, February 13, 2016 Journal-isms will be on hiatus until further notice. Longtime Philly Columnist Was Left Paralyzed in 2010 1 Acel Moore, an icon in the news business who won a Pulitzer Prize, was a co-founder of the National Association of Black Journalists and was a longtime reporter and columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, died Friday night at his home in Cheltenham Township, Pa., a Philadelphia suburb, his wife, Linda Wright Moore , told Journal-isms by telephone Saturday. He was 75.

Acel MooreMoore had been paralyzed from the waist down since spinal surgery in March 2010. There were several different issues going on with him, his wife said. None of us is strong enough to last forever, and he was a tough guy who basically really fought hard to get better and be as well off as he could be.

However, last night he succumbed, she said. Moore worked for 43 years as a reporter, associate editor, and twice-weekly columnist for the Inquirer before retiring in 2005. He had been its first black reporter.

In 2012, the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education ran this brief bio 2 : Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper columnist Acel Moore was born on October 5, 1940 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He attended Settlement Music School from 1954 to 1958. Moore served in the United States Army until 1962 and attended the Charles Morris Price School of Advertising and Journalism from 1964 to 1966.

Moore began his career with the Philadelphia Inquirer as a copy clerk in 1962. In 1964, he became an editorial clerk, and from 1968 to 1981, he worked as a staff writer. In 1970, Moore won the Pennsylvania Bar Association s Scale of Justice Award for his series on the juvenile court system.

In 1974, Moore and Reggie Bryant hosted a television show called Black Perspectives on the News on WHYY public television. In 1977, Moore won the Pulitzer Prize for local investigative reporting for his series on abuse of inmates at Fairview State Hospital. It was the first Pulitzer to a black journalist for writing, rather than photography. From 1980 to 1989, Moore served on the faculty at the University of California at Berkeley for the school s summer program for minority journalists. He has also worked as a journalism instructor at Temple University and Florida A&M University in addition to being a journalism consultant to Northwestern University, Duquesne University, University of Kansas and Norfolk State University.

He was also a Nieman fellow. In recent years, he worked with journalism veteran Dorothy Gilliam on Prime Movers Media, a program that Gilliam began in Washington, D.C., and expanded to Temple University in Philadelphia. As the first intensive journalism mentorship program of its kind, the Temple program gives students after-school journalism experience and training in print, broadcast and online media 3 , Bri Bosak wrote in 2012 for Temple University.

Photo: In 2009, the Philadelphia Inquirer ran a story about five founders of the National Association of Black Journalists who have held prominent positions in Philadelphia newspapers. In addition to Chuck Stone, the first NABJ president, they are, from left, Reggie Bryant, Donnie Roberts, Claude Lewis and Acel Moore, shown at a Feb.

26, 1977, meeting of NABJ two years after its founding. (Credit: Courtesy Donnie Roberts via Philadelphia Inquirer.) That was far from Moore s first effort to help younger journalists, however. He also established the Art Peters Fellowship Program, a copy editing internship that launched the careers of copy editors of color.

In 2005, promoting the 25th anniversary of Moore s Career Development Workshop for high school students, Deirdre Childress , then editor of the Inquirer s Weekend magazine, noted that Acel has raised money since 1984 to train area students in our field, adding that the classes usually averaged 20 to 30 students each year. Also in 2005, on Moore s retirement from the Inquirer, Eugene Kane , then a columnist for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, wrote colleagues, We all know he s a Pulitzer prize winner, a founding member of NABJ, a respected professional who has always kept journalistic ideals about diversity and the African-American experience in the forefront. I know him as a big-time newspaper columnist who took time to mentor a North Philly kid fresh out of Temple University.

He helped me get into the Robert Maynard Institute for Journalism Education s Summer Program for Minority Journalists, and continued being a source of advice and encouragement for the next 20 years. Among Moore s many mentees was Sarah Glover , president of the National Association of Black Journalists, a former photographer at the Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News and former president of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists. After her election in August, she told Journal-isms that she spoke with Moore by telephone before appearing at the victory news conference.

Moore was called boy in the Inquirer newsroom when he started there as a copy clerk in 1962 whites with the same job were called by their names and rose to become an associate editor and columnist. When Moore attended NABJ conventions, Linda Wright Moore said, he could not walk far without being stopped. People would come up to him and say, Mr.

Moore, Acel, you really helped me. It was sweet, she said. Fellow NABJ co-founder Joe Davidson , a columnist for the Washington Post, told colleagues Saturday, I have so many, many fond memories of Acel, someone who welcomed me to Philadelphia before NABJ was founded.

He was such a fine journalist, a trailblazer, a funny man, a proud black man who did so much for our craft and his community. We so need programs like the PBS Black Perspective on the News that he and Reggie Bryant , another NABJ founder, produced. I m proud to have been his friend for so many decades, proud to be a NABJ cofounder with him.

It s a sad day as we celebrate his life. Despite Moore s long illness, his death apparently caught former colleagues unprepared. Philly.com 4 , the website for the Inquirer and Daily News, filed a 252-word story attributed to staff at 1:11 p.m.

In a later version, credited to Stephan Salisbury and Art Carey and filed at 1:08 a.m. Sunday, the story reported that, funeral services, still in the planning stages, will be held Monday, Feb.

22, at Grace Baptist Church of Germantown. Co-Moderator Asks Democrats About White People 5 Obama Live From Illinois on CNN, MSNBC but Not Fox 6 Ex-Mexican President Laughs at Trump Plan for Border Wall 7 NYPD to Act After Story on Barring People From Own Homes 8 Media Begin to Cover Police Killings of Native Americans 9 . . .

Stories About Native Americans Rare, Stereotypical 10 CNN International Desk Staffers Must Reapply for Jobs 11 Mizzou Town Hall Asks Reporters to Leave 12 Parents of Ex-Little Leaguers Sue ESPN, Name Smith 13 Should Al Jazeera America Have Been an App Instead? 14 Short Takes 15 Gwen Ifill, co-moderator of Thursday s Democratic presidential candidates debate on PBS, said, Let me turn this on its head, because when we talk about race in this country, we always talk about African-Americans, people of color. I want to talk about white people, OK? Sen.

Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., above, and rival Hillary Clinton responded. ( video 16 ) Gwen Ifill came to slay 17 , Julia Craven wrote Friday for the Huffington Post. At Thursday night s Democratic presidential debate in Milwaukee, Ifill, a veteran PBS journalist, flipped the typical narrative of race in the U.S. on Hillary Clinton and Sen.

Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) with a vital question about what it means to be white in America. Let me turn this on its head, because when we talk about race in this country, we always talk about African-Americans, people of color, Ifill began, in all her black girl glory. I want to talk about white people, OK?

So many people will be surprised to find out that we are sitting in one of the most racially polarized metropolitan areas in the country, Ifill continued, after reassuring the audience and the candidates that she really did want to talk about white people. By the middle of this century, the nation is going to be majority non-white. Our public schools are already there.

If working-class white Americans are about to be outnumbered, are already underemployed in many cases, and one study found they are dying sooner, don t they have a reason to be resentful? Wow. Ifill, who made history with co-anchor Judy Woodruff as the first all-female team to host a major presidential debate, took an important step in advancing mainstream narratives on race and racism.

As America becomes less white, many white people are becoming more conservative on race relations. This may explain some of Donald Trump s appeal to white middle-class voters. Alas, the candidates responses were typical, reeking of all lives matter without deeply engaging the question. . . .

As noted during the debate, the event represented the first time the majority of those on the debate stage were women. Ifill, Woodruff and Clinton were there, with Sanders the only man. Ta-Nehisi CoatesIn another development, Ta-Nehisi Coates , author and Atlantic magazine national correspondent, told readers that his statement Wednesday morning on Democracy Now!

that he would vote for Sanders should not be read as an endorsement. It is important to say this not just as a writer, but as a black writer 18 , Coates wrote later Wednesday. Too often individuals are appointed to speak for black people.

I don t want any part of it. Black voters deserve to be addressed in all of their beautiful and wonderful complications, not through the lens of unelected thought-leaders. I was asked a question.

I tried to answer it honestly. And that s really all I have. Brian Stelter reported Friday for CNNMoney.com, About 3.9 million viewers tuned in to the debate on PBS, according to Nielsen ratings data 19 .

Around 4.1 million viewers watched on CNN. The unusual two-channel combination clearly helped boost the overall audience for Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders face-off. MSNBC s Democratic debate with the two candidates averaged 4.5 million viewers at the same time last week.

Six months after the first debate of the 2016 primary calendar, it is clear that there is some measure of debate fatigue, more so on the Democratic side than on the Republican side. . . . Ifill s co-moderating would mark the first time a woman of color will moderate a presidential debate since Carole Simpson did so in 1992 20 , Ame Latour noted Thursday for bustle.com. Since that 1992 debate, no person of color had served as moderator of a presidential debate up through October 2015.

In January 2016, Lester Holt moderated a Democratic debate, marking a step in the right direction. The lack of diversity among debate moderators was a subject of controversy in the 2012 election cycle. In 2012, the National Association of Black Journalists publicly decried the lack of Latino and black moderators, and the Spanish-speaking network Univision issued strong protests. . . .

On Thursday, the presidents of the National Association of Black Journalists and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists issued a statement asking news organizations to diversify their reporting and analysis teams to reflect those states and the campaign to come 21 . African American and Hispanic voters will play a major role in deciding who our next president will be. It is important that media outlets have journalists of color directly involved in this election cycle to ensure balanced reporting, Sarah Glover , NABJ president, said in the release.

Together, African Americans and Hispanics make up 30 percent of the U.S. population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau s QuickFacts 2014 data.

Media outlets should be aggressive about ensuring their staffs are diverse and reflective of the communities they serve. Mekahlo Medina , NAHJ president, said, It is important that news organizations are not only reflective of the communities they are covering, but have journalists that best understand those communities. Latinos and African Americans should not be reported on as an abstract block.

News organizations should utilize their growing diverse staffs for accurate and fair coverage. President Obama took a sentimental but also substantive journey to Springfield, Illinois nine years to the day he announced there that he was running for president 22 , James Warren wrote Thursday for the Poynter Institute. He started with private meetings in the legislature with old buds, including poker-playing Democrats and Republicans of old.

He then addressed the legislature and conceded his failure in bridging political divisions. He noted, too, ideologically driven media divisions. And you ve got a fractured media.

Some folks watch Fox News; some folks read The Huffington Post. And very often, what s profitable is the most sensational conflict and the most incendiary sound bites. CNN and MSNBC were airing his remarks live.

Fox did not. MSNBC later broke away from the speech (which was at least 15 minutes too long) in which he mentioned the perils of calling one another idiots and fascists. Fox, instead, opted for reports from New Hampshire and even an interview with Monica Crowley , an acolyte of former President Richard Nixon who likened Donald Trump and Ted Cruz to Nixon but in utterly positive ways.

That might have been a first. Fox thus missed a notable, even poignant return to the building where Abe Lincoln labored and where Obama began his legislative career. The Fox station in Chicago did not, with reporter Mike Flannery running a solid piece last night that tied it into political dysfunction in Illinois. . . .

Julian Alexander , Daily Kos: Did John Lewis Just Mislead the Public About Meeting the Clintons During the Civil Rights Era? 23 Chris Ariens , TVNewser: Where s Fox News s Democratic Debate? 24 Wayne Bennett , the Field Negro: The bigotry of paternalism. 25 Charles M. Blow , New York Times: Stop Bernie-Splaining to Black Voters 26 Jonathan Capehart , Washington Post: Stop sending around this photo of Bernie Sanders 27 Farai Chideya , fivethirtyeight.com: The Black Establishment Chooses Clinton: But that doesn t tell us much about what black voters will do. 28 Chris Cillizza , Washington Post: Winners and losers from the 6th Democratic presidential debate 29 James Clingman , Washington Informer: Raising Money or Just Raising Cain? 30 Julia Craven , Huffington Post: Hillary Clinton And Bernie Sanders Can t End Systemic Racism, But They Care 31 Charles Ferguson , Huffington Post: The Tragedy of Hillary Clinton (And Her Generation) 32 Emil Guillermo , NBC News Asian America: For Asian-American Organizers, All Eyes on Nevada Ahead of Caucuses 33 Gromer Jeffers Jr. , Dallas Morning News: Struggling against Sanders, Clinton takes pains to woo minorities 34 Mark Joyella , TVNewser: The PBS Debate: Genteel, Civilized, Lacking Drama 35 Nicholas Kristof , New York Times: Clinton and Sanders Battle in Sixth Democratic Debate 36 Julianne Malveaux , syndicated: My Head Says Hillary, My Heart Says Bernie 37 Mary Mitchell , Chicago Sun-Times: Obama s look back is also a way forward 38 Tim Murphy , Mother Jones: Here s What Bernie Sanders Actually Did in the Civil Rights Movement 39 Eugene Robinson , Washington Post: So many candidates, so many flaws 40 Alana Horowitz Satlin , HuffPost LatinoVoices: Hillary Clinton Relying On Minority Voters, But They re Not All Relying On Her 41 Goldie Taylor , Daily Beast: Bernie Sanders s Big Problem With Black Democrats 42 Al Tompkins , Poynter Institute: Here s what journalists need to know about superdelegates 43 Mark Trahant , indianz.com: Native voters are the true outsiders in any election 44 Julio Ricardo Varela , latinousa.org: At #DemDebate, Clinton and Sanders Show Clear Differences on Immigration and Central American Crisis 45 Joan Walsh , the Nation: Bernie Sanders Has an Obama Problem 46 Erik Wemple , Washington Post: Yes, the Democrats should do a debate on Fox News 47 The U.S.-Mexican border, with the United States on the left. (Credit: U.S. Customs and Border Protection) For the first time, Donald Trump has disclosed that his proposed wall on the border with Mexico which has become one of the centerpieces of his campaign would cost about $8 billion 48 , columnist Andr s Oppenheimer wrote Wednesday for the Miami Herald.

If so, it would be the biggest waste of money in recent history, even if it were paid for in Mexican pesos. The wall is probably $8 billion, which is a tiny fraction of the money that we lose with Mexico, Trump told MSNBC on Tuesday, after months of refusing to estimate how much his wall proposal would cost. It s a very simple calculation, Trump said.

He explained that the border is 2,000 miles long, and of the 2,000, we don t need 2,000, we need a thousand, because we have natural barriers. Asked how he would pay for the wall, Trump repeated his claim that he would get Mexico to pay for it. Pressed on how he would get Mexico to pay for it, he responded simply, You tell em, You re gonna pay for it.

Needless to say, there was a collective explosion of laughter from the Mexican side of the border. When I called former Mexican President Vicente Fox to ask about Trump s proposed wall, he responded, He s crazy! He added that Trump would trigger a nationalistic counter-reaction in Mexico, isolate the United States from one of its biggest trading partners and hurt the U.S.

economy. He s a false Messiah who says things that people like to hear, but that are irresponsible, he said. There are at least five reasons why Trump s border wall would be, to use one of Trump s favorite terms, stupid.

First, there is no serious study showing that there is currently an avalanche of undocumented immigrants to this country. . . . Second, about 40 percent of migrants who enter the U.S. illegally don t do it by crossing the Mexican border, but come in by plane and overstay their visas, U.S.

officials say. . . . Third, the number of undocumented Mexicans moving to the United States is unlikely to increase in the future for demographic reasons. . . . Fourth, a wall along part of the border would push potential migrants to cross through more remote and dangerous border areas, raise the fees of people smugglers, and ensure that large numbers of undocumented people stay in the United States. . . .

Fifth, Trump s proposed wall, along with his statements depicting most Mexican immigrants as criminals and rapists, his vows to re-negotiate the NAFTA free trade deal with Mexico, and his calls for the deportation of 11 million undocumented people, would almost certainly trigger a nationalistic, anti-American reaction in Mexico, the rest of Latin America, and much of the world. . . . The NYPD is going to be changing very quickly a key part of its process initiating nuisance abatement actions after a Daily News and ProPublica investigation of the little-known tactic 49 , Ginger Adams Otis and Sarah Ryley wrote Thursday for ProPublica and the Daily News in New York. Police Commissioner Bill Bratton said Wednesday that he s taking a fresh look at the part of the process that allows the NYPD to get an order from a judge locking residents out of their homes before they ve had a chance to tell their side of the story in court.

Judges approved the NYPD s requests for such orders 75 percent of the time, according to the joint Daily News and ProPublica expos that first ran online Friday. We have been very happy to work with all of our elected officials to take a look at other things that we might want to adjust, Bratton said Wednesday, his first public response to the investigation since it was published. One of those areas that we have adjusted very quickly in conversations is the issue of ex parte elements of this program, which we will be changing very quickly.

Ex parte is a Latin term for a decision made by a judge without all parties present. Zachary Carter , head of the city Law Department, said the agency will review the process to ensure such orders are only sought in cases of appropriate urgency. The Law Department, which is tasked with reviewing the court filings and settlements in nuisance abatement actions as the NYPD s co-counsel, has not yet clarified what constitutes appropriate urgency.

But the Daily News/ProPublica found the NYPD s requests for lockout orders were based on information that was, on average, six months old for residences, despite claiming illegal activity at the location was ongoing. . . . Native Lives Matter movement supporters march in February 2015 in Rapid City, S.D. (Credit: Sean Ryan/Rapid City Journal) On a cold winter s night, a few minutes after 6 p.m., police in Rapid City, South Dakota were called to a house in the Lakota Community Homes development where Allen Locke and his family were living 50 , Jon Marcus wrote Thursday for Nieman Reports. Locke, 30, was drunk, his wife said, and she wanted him out of the house until he sobered up.

The responding officer, Anthony Meirose , found Locke on the kitchen floor. As Locke stood up, the officer noticed a steak knife in his hand. Meirose told investigators that he heard Locke say It s a good day to die, and that he ordered Locke several times to drop the knife, according to a report from the South Dakota Division of Criminal investigation (DCI).

When he didn t, Meirose fired five shots at him. Locke was pronounced dead at the hospital. The South Dakota DCI determined that Locke had lunged at the officer, though his wife says she witnessed the incident and disputes this.

No charges were filed against Meirose. The killing of Allen Locke on that cold night just before Christmas in 2014 got little attention outside Rapid City. Nor, in the year or so since, has there been much widespread coverage of the killings of Paul Castaway , shot in Denver in July by police who said he was threatening his mother, though she argues that deadly force was unnecessary in this incident; William J.

Dick III , a 28-year-old suspected armed robber who died in Washington State after a U.S. Forest Service agent shocked him with a Taser; or Larry Kobuk , 33, who died after being restrained by officers booking him into the Anchorage Correctional Complex on charges that he stole a car and drove it with a suspended license. All of these people were Native Americans.

The day before his death, Locke, a member of the Oglala Lakota tribe of Pine Ridge, and about 100 other people took part in a march in Rapid City calling for better treatment by police of Native Americans. Hands up. Don t shoot, the protesters chanted under gray skies and in chilly temperatures.

There is, one speaker at the rally said, an undeclared race war here in South Dakota. Police kill Native Americans at almost the same rate as African-Americans, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Between 1999 and 2013, an average of .29 per 100,000 Native Americans were killed by police, compared to .3 per 100,000 for blacks and .11 per 100,000 for whites.

America should be aware of this, argues Chase Iron Eyes , a lawyer and a leader of the Lakota People s Law Project, which runs a publicity campaign called Native Lives Matter. But for the most part, America is not aware of this. That may be changing, albeit slowly, as both mainstream media and Native American-run digital outlets begin to cover American Indian issues more robustly. . . .

Stories that mention Native Americans remain comparatively rare, according to Christopher Josey , who conducted research on this topic as a doctoral candidate at the University of Illinois 51 , Jon Marcus wrote Thursday in his Nieman Reports piece. His 2010 review of the top 20 Internet news sites by traffic, from The Daily Beast to The New York Times, found that Native Americans accounted for .6 percent of the people portrayed in news coverage on those sites, though Census figures show that the 5.2 million Native Americans make up 1.7 percent of the U.S. population.

When they were mentioned in stories, Josey says, Native Americans were often portrayed in stereotypical situations as the owners of and workers in casinos, for example. By neglecting them in coverage and showing them in stereotypical ways when they do, he says, news media are communicating that Native Americans are not a vital part of the national conversation on race. . . . The story quotes Native journalists Mary Hudetz , Jason Begay , Mark Trahant and Tristan Ahtone , all of whom have all been active in the Native American Journalists Association.

Scott Gillespie and Jill Burcum of the Star Tribune of Minneapolis and Sari Horwitz of the Washington Post are quoted as non-Native journalists who have reported on Native issues. More than two dozen staffers at CNN Atlanta will have to reapply for their jobs as the International Desk undergoes a restructuring 52 , Chris Ariens reported Wednesday for TVNewser. The news, first reported by CNN Commentary, is part of a larger plan by CNNI svp and managing editor Deborah Rayner to assure coverage across the globe.

So, while several positions will move to Hong Kong and London, Atlanta staffers will experience title changes, requiring them to apply for the new jobs. Insiders say this does not involve layoffs and the changes do not affect CNN or CNNI programming. . . . Lauren Cone , a CNN spokeswoman, told Journal-isms Thursday by email, What Chris Ariens posted on TVNewser yesterday is accurate.

A Concerned Town Hall meeting advertised to black students and students of color at the University of Missouri on Wednesday turned out to be less-than-inclusive to white reporters attempting to cover the event 53 , Jennifer Kabbany reported Friday for the College Fix, which describes itself as a news and commentary site dedicated to higher education news 54 . The gathering was organized by Concerned Student 1950, which led protests on campus last fall accusing the institution of racism; it describes itself as seeking the liberation of all BLACK collegiate students on Twitter. As the meeting began Wednesday night inside the A.

P. Green Chapel at the public university, a student organizer announced: If there are any reporters in here, can you please exit? That was my nice warning.

That according to a video of the event taken by Mark Schierbecker 55 , a student at the school and freelance videographer who contributes to The College Fix. His video shows a white male reporter from the mainstream city newspaper, The Columbia Tribune , introduced himself and say we will definitely respect your privacy. Just curious, um why are you guys afr why are you guys asking us to leave?

Um, just because I asked you to, came the reply. We just want to discuss some things. Sure, OK, that s totally fine, the reporter replied, handing over his business card before he exited the chapel.

Two white females also left the room. Schierbecker, however, politely declined to leave, repeating my personal preference is to stay. . . . The town hall ended promptly within minutes of starting when students decided to relocate the forum to a more private location. “There was one black man there taking photos of me with a DSLR, but he may have been with Concerned Student 1950.

As you saw in the video though, they seemed to only want confirmed white allies there.” Schierbecker wrote. updated Feb.

14 Stephen A. Smith Parents of former Little Leaguers from Jackie Robinson West filed a lawsuit Thursday against Little League International, ESPN and officials from the local league, alleging, among other things, that they profited off the disgraced team while knowing of its ineligible players 56 , David Matthews and Mark Konkol reported Thursday for dnainfo.com. The lawsuit by Jackie Robinson West s former coach Darold Butler and other team parents also names former league president Bill Haley , Evergreen Park whistleblower Chris Janes , the suburban Little League Janes represents and ESPN commentator Stephen A.

Smith . The complaint says Butler and other team officials were diligent submitting boundary maps and player addresses throughout the team s captivating 2014 run, which they allege Little League publicized for their gain without making parents aware the team fielded ineligible players who lived outside JRW boundaries. Jackie Robinson West won the U.S.

Little League title in 2014, but it was stripped last year after Little League International ruled JRW officials allowed ineligible players to make the roster. The complaint filed Thursday falls on the anniversary of JRW s title stripping. . . . Matthews and Konkol also wrote, The lawsuit also alleges ESPN defamed Butler and others by saying they fabricated residency documents and deliberately assembled JRW s ineligible team.

The lawsuit specifically names ESPN personality Stephen A. Smith , who said on national television that Butler threw his players into the wind. An ESPN spokesman did not have an immediate comment. . . .

In January, the deep-pocketed Al Jazeera Media Network announced the shutdown of its United States cable news channel, Al Jazeera America 57 (AJA), Joe Mohen , a digital media entrepreneur, wrote Friday for Broadcasting & Cable. Industry pundits have found a range of reasons for the meltdown: internal disputes, discrimination, racism, bias, and even the decline of its price of oil. All of these explanations are wrong.

AJA failed for one reason: It had a fatally flawed strategy. The network is textbook example of a business with an excellent product that still failed, entirely because it chose the wrong distribution channel. When AJA launched in 2013, it was already too late to launch a new cable channel.

Cable is in permanent, irreversible, secular decline. Just as launching a successful new magazine is almost impossible nowadays, so too is launching a new cable brand. Had it been distributed as an app like Netflix, it would have likely succeeded and became the first big 24-hour OTT network backed by a linear TV company.

But Al Jazeera hired the wrong advisers and consultants, dinosaurs who did not see fundamental shifts. . . . The family and friends of Michael J. Feeney came together in a big way in the week following his unexpected Jan.

31 death, raising enough money to create an endowed scholarship at Delaware State University in the esteemed alumnus name 58 , the university announced Wednesday. During both the Feb.

8 and Feb.

9 funerals held in New York City and Englewood, N.J., respectively, the newly created $10,000 Michael J. Feeney Memorial Endowed Scholarship was announced to the large gatherings assembled. . . .

Maya A. Jones Maya A. Jones , a senior researcher at ESPN The Magazine, is joining the Undefeated, a digital division of ESPN that will focus on sports, race and culture.

Jones, a 2012 graduate of Xavier University, was hired as a staff writer. The National Association of Black Journalists has approved a Black College Task Force that includes students, faculty, alumni and advocates of the more than 100 historically black colleges and universities nationwide, in the task force s description. The group s mission centers around building camaraderie among HBCU stakeholders; providing a range of resources for student media outlets at black colleges; helping black colleges expand/diversify journalism curricula to compete on a national scale; and serving as a watchdog for mainstream media outlets coverage of black colleges.

Those interested may contact Daarel Burnette at Daarel.burnette (at) gmail.com; Michael R. Grant at mrg (at) hiimmike.com; or Clare Polke clare.polke (at) gmail.com. The American Society of News Editors and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press are pleased to announce the 11th annual Sunshine Week initiative, March 13-19 59 , the organizations announced Thursday.

Special projects and events are already planned around the nation to mark this year s open-government awareness, which will be even more meaningful as the federal Freedom of Information Act approaches its 50th year in July. . . . David Aldridge Longtime NBA reporter David Aldridge and ESPN broadcaster Jay Bilas are the 2016 Curt Gowdy Media Award recipients 60 , the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame announced on Friday. The two will be acknowledged for their contributions to basketball during the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame Enshrinement events September 8-10 in Springfield, Massachusetts. . . .

Responding in kind over the weekend, reporters Jon Caramanica , Wesley Morris and Jenna Wortham quickly debated the merits of Beyonc s Formation in the pages of The New York Times 61 , Richard Horgan wrote Thursday for FishbowlNY. The superstar released the track Saturday and performed it a day later during the Super Bowl Halftime Show. But the kicker came later, in the form of a thank you note to one of the trio. . . .

staff writer Wortham now has the Bey equivalent of a Pulitzer. . . . Univision Digital announced the launch of Pap s y Mam s, a new bilingual parenting channel created in partnership with Ricky Martin s parenting site, Piccolo Universe 62 , Veronica Villafa e reported Friday for her Media Moves site. Targeted to Latino parents, Pap s y Mam s features content in Spanish and English that includes columns by parenting bloggers, news and trends, videos and unique articles written by Ricky Martin and other celebrities.

It is now the official parenting channel for Univision.com. . . . I t seems news management at KRIV, the Fox-owned Houston station, is getting an overhaul 63 , Kevin Eck reported Thursday for TVSpy. A KRIV spokesperson confirmed with TVSpy two positions were eliminated today: assistant news director Howard Dorsey and managing editor Geoff Roth . . . .

At Emerson College, the journalism department is focusing on inclusivity by encouraging students to acquire diverse sources and pay attention to underrepresented communities 64 , according to Paul Niwa , associate professor and chair, Allison Hagan reported Thursday for the Berkeley Beacon, Emerson s independent, student-run newspaper. Niwa said professors are actively encouraging students to use diverse sources while reporting. He said the truth can only be uncovered through exploring marginalized viewpoints and allowing them to be heard. . . .

Reporting on South Sudan, Reporters Without Borders said Thursday that it calls for the immediate and unconditional release of Joseph Afandi , a journalist with the Juba-based daily newspaper Al-Tabeer , who has been held without charge for more than six weeks. The press freedom group said An article he wrote in December criticized the ruling Sudan People s Liberation Movement and the government s passive response to the civil war that has been ravaging the country since December 2013 65 . . . . Follow Richard Prince on Twitter @princeeditor Facebook users: Like Richard Prince s Journal-isms on Facebook. 66 67 References ^ Longtime Philly Columnist Was Left Paralyzed in 2010 (mije.org) ^ brief bio (mije.org) ^ gives students after-school journalism experience and training in print, broadcast and online media (temple-news.com) ^ Philly.com (mobile.philly.com) ^ Co-Moderator Asks Democrats About White People (mije.org) ^ Obama Live From Illinois on CNN, MSNBC but Not Fox (mije.org) ^ Ex-Mexican President Laughs at Trump Plan for Border Wall (mije.org) ^ NYPD to Act After Story on Barring People From Own Homes (mije.org) ^ Media Begin to Cover Police Killings of Native Americans (mije.org) ^ . . .

Stories About Native Americans Rare, Stereotypical (mije.org) ^ CNN International Desk Staffers Must Reapply for Jobs (mije.org) ^ Mizzou Town Hall Asks Reporters to Leave (mije.org) ^ Parents of Ex-Little Leaguers Sue ESPN, Name Smith (mije.org) ^ Should Al Jazeera America Have Been an App Instead? (mije.org) ^ Short Takes (mije.org) ^ video (www.huffingtonpost.com) ^ Gwen Ifill came to slay (www.huffingtonpost.com) ^ It is important to say this not just as a writer, but as a black writer (www.theatlantic.com) ^ About 3.9 million viewers tuned in to the debate on PBS, according to Nielsen ratings data (money.cnn.com) ^ the first time a woman of color will moderate a presidential debate since Carole Simpson did so in 1992 (www.bustle.com) ^ to diversify their reporting and analysis teams to reflect those states and the campaign to come (www.nabj.org) ^ President Obama took a sentimental but also substantive journey to Springfield, Illinois nine years to the day he announced there that he was running for president (www.poynter.org) ^ Did John Lewis Just Mislead the Public About Meeting the Clintons During the Civil Rights Era? (www.dailykos.com) ^ Where s Fox News s Democratic Debate? (www.adweek.com) ^ The bigotry of paternalism. (field-negro.blogspot.com) ^ Stop Bernie-Splaining to Black Voters (www.nytimes.com) ^ Stop sending around this photo of Bernie Sanders (www.washingtonpost.com) ^ The Black Establishment Chooses Clinton: But that doesn t tell us much about what black voters will do. (fivethirtyeight.com) ^ Winners and losers from the 6th Democratic presidential debate (www.washingtonpost.com) ^ Raising Money or Just Raising Cain? (washingtoninformer.com) ^ Hillary Clinton And Bernie Sanders Can t End Systemic Racism, But They Care (www.huffingtonpost.com) ^ The Tragedy of Hillary Clinton (And Her Generation) (www.huffingtonpost.com) ^ For Asian-American Organizers, All Eyes on Nevada Ahead of Caucuses (www.nbcnews.com) ^ Struggling against Sanders, Clinton takes pains to woo minorities (www.dallasnews.com) ^ The PBS Debate: Genteel, Civilized, Lacking Drama (www.adweek.com) ^ Clinton and Sanders Battle in Sixth Democratic Debate (kristof.blogs.nytimes.com) ^ My Head Says Hillary, My Heart Says Bernie (washingtoninformer.com) ^ Obama s look back is also a way forward (chicago.suntimes.com) ^ Here s What Bernie Sanders Actually Did in the Civil Rights Movement (www.motherjones.com) ^ So many candidates, so many flaws (www.washingtonpost.com) ^ Hillary Clinton Relying On Minority Voters, But They re Not All Relying On Her (www.huffingtonpost.com) ^ Bernie Sanders s Big Problem With Black Democrats (www.thedailybeast.com) ^ Here s what journalists need to know about superdelegates (www.poynter.org) ^ Native voters are the true outsiders in any election (www.indianz.com) ^ At #DemDebate, Clinton and Sanders Show Clear Differences on Immigration and Central American Crisis (latinousa.org) ^ Bernie Sanders Has an Obama Problem (www.thenation.com) ^ Yes, the Democrats should do a debate on Fox News (www.washingtonpost.com) ^ For the first time, Donald Trump has disclosed that his proposed wall on the border with Mexico which has become one of the centerpieces of his campaign would cost about $8 billion (www.miamiherald.com) ^ The NYPD is going to be changing very quickly a key part of its process initiating nuisance abatement actions after a Daily News and ProPublica investigation of the little-known tactic (www.propublica.org) ^ On a cold winter s night, a few minutes after 6 p.m., police in Rapid City, South Dakota were called to a house in the Lakota Community Homes development where Allen Locke and his family were living (niemanreports.org) ^ Stories that mention Native Americans remain comparatively rare, according to Christopher Josey, who conducted research on this topic as a doctoral candidate at the University of Illinois (niemanreports.org) ^ More than two dozen staffers at CNN Atlanta will have to reapply for their jobs as the International Desk undergoes a restructuring (www.adweek.com) ^ A Concerned Town Hall meeting advertised to black students and students of color at the University of Missouri on Wednesday turned out to be less-than-inclusive to white reporters attempting to cover the event (www.thecollegefix.com) ^ a news and commentary site dedicated to higher education news (www.thecollegefix.com) ^ Mark Schierbecker (www.columbiamissourian.com) ^ Parents of former Little Leaguers from Jackie Robinson West filed a lawsuit Thursday against Little League International, ESPN and officials from the local league, alleging, among other things, that they profited off the disgraced team while knowing of its ineligible players (www.dnainfo.com) ^ In January, the deep-pocketed Al Jazeera Media Network announced the shutdown of its United States cable news channel, Al Jazeera America (www.broadcastingcable.com) ^ The family and friends of Michael J.

Feeney came together in a big way in the week following his unexpected Jan.

31 death, raising enough money to create an endowed scholarship at Delaware State University in the esteemed alumnus name (www.desu.edu) ^ The American Society of News Editors and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press are pleased to announce the 11th annual Sunshine Week initiative, March 13-19 (www.rcfp.org) ^ Longtime NBA reporter David Aldridge and ESPN broadcaster Jay Bilas are the 2016 Curt Gowdy Media Award recipients (www.hoophall.com) ^ Responding in kind over the weekend, reporters Jon Caramanica, Wesley Morris and Jenna Wortham quickly debated the merits of Beyonc s Formation in the pages of The New York Times (www.adweek.com) ^ Univision Digital announced the launch of Pap s y Mam s, a new bilingual parenting channel created in partnership with Ricky Martin s parenting site, Piccolo Universe (www.mediamoves.com) ^ t seems news management at KRIV, the Fox-owned Houston station, is getting an overhaul (www.adweek.com) ^ the journalism department is focusing on inclusivity by encouraging students to acquire diverse sources and pay attention to underrepresented communities (www.berkeleybeacon.com) ^ An article he wrote in December criticized the ruling Sudan People s Liberation Movement and the government s passive response to the civil war that has been ravaging the country since December 2013 (en.rsf.org) ^ Follow Richard Prince on Twitter (twitter.com) ^ fan page (www.facebook.com)

AHI: United States » The hipster's mobile home: Part 5, Awesome for …

Continued from yesterday s Part 4 and the preceding Part 1 2 , Part 2 3 , and Part 3 4 .] By: David A. Smith 5 Something bothering you? Reese : No one s bothering you, Doniphon. 6 Tom Doniphon : You are. 7 The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance As suggested by previous parts of this discursive post inspired by a Globe and Mail (6 January 2016) article by Erin Anderssen , who lived the experience for ten weeks, the tiny is a romantic notion, not unlike our longing for a pre-urbanized greensward or the American fascination with the manly Old West, where we make our own little homestead house in the wilderness, where the sun comes over the mountains or the lake or the stream: 8 9 10 But let s be honest.

It s the ocean that brings us back each summer. AHI posts on micro-housing October 23, 2006: The 50-year trends in affordable housing , 3 parts, physical, financial 11 April 14, 2006: The evolving modern home , larger, higher tech, live-work 12 March 20, 2007: Home configurations: let s get small , 2 parts, birth of micro homes 13 May 18, 2009: Outlaw In-Laws , 2 parts, Accessory Dwelling Units 14 October 12, 2010: he $300 house: the financial challenge , from Harvard Business Review s blog, also here 15 16 January 26, 2011: the $300 house: the value-chain challenge , 17 January 28, 2013: Grandma in a can? , using web tech to monitor for services 18 April 10, 2013: Micro and macro housing issues , 2 parts, micro homes and zoning 19 August 16, 2013: Micro-housing in the realm of the impractical , Renzo s impractical piano 20 February 3, 2014: Rounded-shouldered psyches , 2 parts, psychology of overcrowding 21 And no one disturbs our peace. Liberty Valance : You got a choice, Dishwasher.

Either you get out of town, or tonight you be out on that street alone. You be there, and don t make us come and get you. 22 2d. No Exit: hell is other people No, you can t leave at intermission it s a one-act play!

Squeeze that A-frame into a lane-way city lot, with brick walls for a view, and as my boys so succinctly put it, none of us would like each other for very long. The Jains have seven levels If indeed hell is being trapped with other people, then the second and deeper level of hell is with family (within whom nothing is ever forgotten); third is family in enforced isolation (where the past is the only news); and the fourth is family in isolation in cramped quarters (where there is no privacy). I can t imagine anyone with children not going bonkers in them Honestly, mommy, you ll look back on this and laugh wryly To be fair, anyone with children goes bonkers from time to time; just imagine the intensity of bonkerdom when you cannot escape from the minions.

says Susan Saegert , an environmental psychology professor at the City University of New York graduate school, who studies the effect of overcrowding on families. 23 24 Overcrowding is illegal. We are not meerkats. Though you have to admit it looks cozy In such compression-stress environments, the emotional air becomes first stale, then toxic, and 2e.

Eventually you move out Remember that couple featured in the documentary Tiny , which depicted their tiny home s construction and extolled the minimalist lifestyle? 25 Just you, me, and the documentary crew They parked the end result in a field in Colorado and never lived in it together full-time. Visit with Christopher Smith, left, and Merete Mueller who have built a tiny home on land near Hartsel, Colorado. The couple were at their new space on Thursday, May 3, 2012.

The exterior of the home is 19 feet by 7 feet. Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post It looks better when we re outside it Is that hypocrisy or wisdom born of experience? Whatever it may be, it s the norm: Carrie and Shane Caverly lasted 18 months before they decided it was too small and moved into an apartment. 26 Caverly abandoning their dream?

Nor was that part of the mythic narrative: Marttinen and his wife, Dannilee, and their toddler, Holden, lived in the house for 18 months. Eighteen months, and then the small person rebelled? They sold it recently after moving to British Columbia.

It was awesome for a time, he says just not a long-term option for a growing family. Part 3: Urban constraints Like the wheels on the bottom of those tiny trailer homes, the movement s form falls short on function. If it s commitment to the cause that s being measured, then Allan Cerf , an advertising director in California, was surprised by what he discovered when he set out to research how to live in a tiny home. 27 Don t point that finger at me; it might go off What then is the practical utility of tiny houses?

There is no shortage of builders trying to make a go of it here. A tiny-home community is in the works in Vancouver, and there s a micro village outside Terrace, BC. We have to define it by exclusion where the tiny house isn t practical, and we ll start with the easiest place.

AHI posts on mobile dwellings History: Mobile homes: how they got here , Part 1 , Part 2 , Part 3 , Part 4 . 28 29 30 31 32 Speculation: Are mobile home owners really renters? 33 California: Gouging in space rent: Modesto, California : Part 1 , Part 2 34 35 36 California : NORCs like us , Pismo Beach, CA, 6 parts , how a community evolves 37 38 Florida: Land worth $510 million?: Briny Breezes : Part 1 , Part 2 , Part 3 39 40 41 42 Florida : Sail away, sail away?, 2 parts, is a houseboat a home? 43 Massachusetts : Mobile home park co-operative conversions , 2 parts 44 New Hampshire: A tale of two states , state law defines owners rights 45 New Jersey: Rezoning of Paradise Park , Highlands: Part 1 , Part 2 , Part 3 , Part 4 , Part 5 , Part 6 , Part 7 , and a happy pre-ending: Part 1 , Part 2 , Part 3 and Part 4 . 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 Washington: Co-op seeking to buy its land: Seattle, the price of security 58 3a. Tiny houses are impractical in the urban context As the country s Canada s Ed. largest cities look to increase density with lane-way housing and basement apartments, smaller living space becomes a necessary consideration. I s understandable to conflate increasing urban density with the necessity of living in less space but that s false.

As I ve posted many times, the solution to overcrowding is verticality : going up . With elevators (the vertical utility ), rebar, and ever-lighter strong building materials, we can at least quadruple our livable space. 59 60 61 QED at least in land-development terms Unfortunately, the same people who espouse tiny houses also favor sunset-scarcity zoning , conservation districts, historic struldbrug mandates , zero-sum inclusionary zoning , and similar surcharges that make urban housing unaffordable, and do not see the contradiction. 62 63 64 To be fair, the people abandoning their tiny homes aren t trading them for McMansions their fallbacks are still small by modern standards. And there are certainly people who make a full-time go of it.

Bear in mind that those who embarked on tiny houses are self-selected to begin with; and if the washouts are the majority of even the initial enthusiasts, there is something fundamentally flawed with the conception. But it s not hard to find up-sizers, even among the movement s keenest enthusiasts. The flaws is simple: the sacrifices are more costly in reality than in the dreams. Reader, in case you re wondering, I m not cherry-picking hipsters: tiny houses are hipsterdom s palaces.

Ed. Marc Davison and his wife recently travelled to Portland, Ore., where the tiny-home movement took early root. They soon realized that the model homes they toured were just too small, especially for their pets , and any kids that might come along. 65 66 It didn t feel homey. It felt like work , where you had to watch every step, every movement, watch out for bumping your head. 67 As Mr.

Davison realized, it was work: he was paying himself in reduced rent for his lost-opportunity cost of lower earning power and lower optionality and quality of life. Maybe it was feasible in California, he mused, where they could live most of their days outside. This is not practical in Canada.

If not in the urban context, and not for the young aspirational household, then where and for whom?

What might work short-term for a hip millennial in New York is not necessarily the answer for a single mom. Continued tomorrow in Part 6. References ^ Part 4 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 1 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 2 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 3 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ David A.

Smith (www.affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Reese (www.imdb.com) ^ Tom Doniphon (www.imdb.com) ^ Globe and Mail (6 January 2016) (www.theglobeandmail.com) ^ Erin Anderssen (www.theglobeandmail.com) ^ for a pre-urbanized greensward (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ October 23, 2006: The 50-year trends in affordable housing (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ April 14, 2006: The evolving modern home (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ March 20, 2007: Home configurations: let s get small, (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ May 18, 2009: Outlaw In-Laws (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ October 12, 2010: he $300 house: the financial challenge (hbr.org) ^ also here (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ January 26, 2011: the $300 house: the value-chain challenge (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ January 28, 2013: Grandma in a can? (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ April 10, 2013: Micro and macro housing issues (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ August 16, 2013: Micro-housing in the realm of the impractical (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ February 3, 2014: Rounded-shouldered psyches (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Liberty Valance (www.imdb.com) ^ Susan Saegert (enviropsych.org) ^ City University of New York (www.gc.cuny.edu) ^ Tiny (www.imdb.com) ^ Carrie and Shane Caverly (clotheslinetinyhomes.com) ^ Allan Cerf (biadverts.com) ^ Mobile homes: how they got here (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 1 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 2 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 3 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 4 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ really renters? (www.affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Modesto, California (www.affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 1 (www.affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 2 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ NORCs like us (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ 6 parts (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Briny Breezes (www.affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 1 (www.affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 2 (www.affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 3 (www.affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Sail away, sail away?, (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Mobile home park co-operative conversions (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ A tale of two states (www.affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Paradise Park (www.affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 1 (www.affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 2 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 3 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 4 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 5 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 6 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 7 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 1 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 2 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 3 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Part 4 (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ the price of security (www.affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ verticality (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ going up (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ elevators (the vertical utility (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ sunset-scarcity zoning (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ historic struldbrug mandates (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ zero-sum inclusionary zoning (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ Marc Davison (www.edmontonjournal.com) ^ especially for their pets (affordablehousinginstitute.org) ^ It felt like work (affordablehousinginstitute.org)

Judge Dismisses Charges Against Cop for Molesting 3-yo – Jails …

McAlester, OK Oklahoma judge Matthew Sheets dismissed three felony child sexual abuse charges against a retired police officer accused of molesting a 3-year-old girl, seemingly ignoring forensic evidence showing that a sexual assault had occurred, as well as evidence of the cop burning the child s clothing after the alleged attack. When the girl s father objected to the manner in which his child was being treated while being questioned by the court, Judge Sheets threw him in jail for a year. According to a report by Photography is Not A Crime 1 : Pittsburg County Special District Judge Matthew Sheets dismissed the felony child sex charges against Martin Stites because the girl, now four, was unable to describe in detail how she was molested.

Stites, 57, spent 22 years with the McAlester Police Department before he retired as a lieutenant in 2011. In 2015, he was watching the girl on behalf of the mother. Because a 4-year-old child was uncomfortable and timid in answering questions about her sexual molestation in open court, with the person accused of sexually assaulting her sitting right in front of her, the judge took it upon himself to dispense with the possibility of allowing the victim to find justice through the legal system.

According to the McAlester News-Capital 2 : Authorities at the time said a forensic analysis of the child indicated she d been sexually assaulted. Authorities also said there was evidence to indicate the victim s clothing was burned after the fact. It was during the victim s testimony when things quickly turned ugly.

Burns asked the victim if she could identify her assailant in the courtroom. The victim gave an answer, but the answer was not completely audible. Burns said she thought the victim said something along the lines of I don t know, but the victim s father wanted to point out she had said I don t want to look at him.

When the victim s father attempted to correct the judge s misinterpretation of what the child had said, he was removed from the courtroom. While exiting the courtroom the dad allegedly pushed the door open loudly and used profanity, prompting Judge Sheets to have him arrested. The McAlester News-Capital went on to report: After a short break, the father reappeared in the courtroom with handcuffs on as he was escorted by a deputy.

Sheets asked him what he said while exiting the courtroom and the father confirmed he used foul language. Sheets sentenced the man to six months in the Pittsburg County Justice Center. The father then tuned to Stites and used several cuss words to voice his displeasure with him.

Sheets then used his gavel to restore order and sentenced the man to an additional six months in the county jail, citing a second violation. After the father was taken away from the courtroom, the preliminary hearing started again. The child offered testimony, using a nickname for Stites, indicating the individual had touched her with his hand on her private areas.

However, many of the questions asked by Burns to the 4-year-old were met with a I don t know response and her telling officials she did not want to answer some of the questions. After dismissing the three felony sexual assault charges against Stites, Judge Sheets ordered him to stand trial on a new charge of lewd molestation, apparently based on information given in her testimony that was not previously known. However convoluted Sheets rulings may have been, it s clear is that in May 2015 the girl was taken to a local hospital by a Pittsburgh County Sheriff s investigator, where it was determined by a nurse that the 3-year-old had been sexually assaulted.

When another deputy went to Stites residence to collect the child s clothing, they discovered that the accused had burned the diapers the girl had been wearing. It seems extremely odd, or intentional, that neither of the Pittsburgh County Sheriff s investigators nor the nurse from the hospital were called to testify, in essence leaving a 4-year-old abuse victim s testimony on the stand as the sole source on which the judge ultimately base his decision. Who made the decision not to call the nurse or the investigator; and for what reason?

The forcing of a small child of 4-years-old to testify in open court about a traumatic incident that happened when she was 3 is morally reprehensible. To dismiss the three felony charges, due to the child s lack of ability to testify is a complete injustice and degrades the remaining fabric of legitimacy the justice system claims to hold. Judge Sheets actions show more interest in asserting control and power over those in his court, than for actually providing a modicum of justice for a small child allegedly abused at the hands of a former police officer.

Jay Syrmopoulos is a political analyst, free thinker, researcher, and ardent opponent of authoritarianism. He is currently a graduate student at University of Denver pursuing a masters in Global Affairs. Jay s work has been published on Ben Swann s Truth in Media, Truth-Out, Raw Story, MintPress News, as well as many other sites.

You can follow him on Twitter @sirmetropolis, on Facebook at Sir Metropolis and now on tsu. 3 4 5 comments powered by HyperComments 6 References ^ Photography is Not A Crime (photographyisnotacrime.com) ^ McAlester News-Capital (www.mcalesternews.com) ^ @sirmetropolis, (twitter.com) ^ Sir Metropolis (www.facebook.com) ^ tsu. (www.tsu.co) ^ comments widget (hypercomments.com)

10 Key Plays From Super Bowl 50 « CBS Denver

SANTA CLARA, Calif. (The Sports Xchange) Von Miller and the Denver Broncos No.

1-ranked defense dominated the Carolina Panthers in Super Bowl 50. The Panthers, who had the highest-scoring offense in the NFL in 2015, and NFL Most Valuable Player Cam Newton didn t find their way fighting for survival against a potent pass rush led by Miller and eight-time All-Pro linebacker DeMarcus Ware. Ware smothered Newton at the Carolina 6-yard line with 2:40 left in the game for Denver s seventh sack in the game.

Here are the 10 critical plays in Super Bowl 50: Fourth quarter, Panthers ball, third-and-9, Carolina 25 (4:03 left) The Panthers took over with 4:51 left in the game. Newton checked to a run to fullback Mike Tollbert that gained 1 on first down and fired low and well wide of rookie receiver Devin Funchess on second down. On third-and-long, Newton stepped up in the pocket, but Miller swiped the ball out for the second time in the game.

Safety T.J. Ward recovered at the 4. Head coach Gary Kubiak of the Denver Broncos is splashed with Gatorade in the final moments their Super Bowl 50 win at Levi s Stadium on February 7, 2016 in Santa Clara, California.

The Denver Broncos defeated the Carolina Panthers 24-10. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images) Fourth quarter, Broncos ball, third-and-4, Panthers 4 (3:13 left) The Broncos were on the verge of choking in the red zone for the fourth time and going for a field goal, but quarterback Peyton Manning was bailed out when Panthers cornerback Josh Norman was flagged for holding on a pass that sailed well over the head of wide receiver Demaryius Thomas. Running back C.J. Anderson plowed through a Luke Kuechly tackle for a 2-yard touchdown, and wide receiver Bennie Fowler caught the two-point conversion pass to give the Broncos a 24-10 lead.

Third quarter, Panthers ball, fourth-and-5, Denver 26 (8:22 left) A 45-yard completion from Newton to wide receiver Ted Ginn and a 14-yarder to Ginn helped get the Panthers into field goal range. Kicker Graham Gano was brought on to try a 44-yard field goal after three consecutive plays netted a total of minus-1 yard. However, Gano s try nailed the right upright and fell no good, keeping the Denver lead at 16-7.

Third quarter, Panthers ball, second-and-10, Denver 28 (5:57 left) Newton sailed a pass down the middle intended for Ginn. Ward made the interception on one knee at the 5, stumbled, then fumbled when he got to his feet. Linebacker Danny Trevathan recovered to keep the ball in Denver s possession.

Second quarter, Panthers ball, first-and-goal, Denver 1 (11:25 left) Carolina opened the second quarter with the ball, trailing 10-0, and delivered its best drive of the game. Newton ran for 11 and 12 yards on consecutive plays and hit tight end Greg Olsen for a 19-yard completion off play-action on third-and-1 from the Denver 34. His next pass was a 13-yard dart to wide receiver Corey Brown to the 2, and running back Jonathan Stewart dove in for a 1-yard touchdown.

Second quarter, Panthers ball, fourth-and-12, Carolina 47 (9:29 left) Before he fielded the punt from Carolina s Brad Nortman, Broncos wide receiver Jordan Norwood was grabbed on the left hip and shoulder by Panthers special teamer Colin Jones. No flag was thrown for not giving Norwood space to make the catch. That worked to the benefit of the Broncos.

Norwood fielded the ball and with some players slowing up anticipating a fair catch or penalty, bolted to his right and down the Denver sideline for a Super Bowl-record 61-yard return. He was pulled down at the Carolina 14-yard line by hustling Panthers backup defensive end Mario Addison. The Broncos moved to the Carolina 5 before a holding penalty on guard Louis Vasquez negated Anderson s first-down run on fourth-and-1.

Brandon McManus kicked a 33-yard field goal to give the Broncos a 13-7 lead with 6:58 left in the half. Second quarter, Panthers ball, first-and-10, Carolina 49 (6:39 left) After the McManus field goal, the Panthers picked up a first down when defensive tackle Malik Jackson was flagged for unnecessary roughness for a hit away from the ball that followed a near-fumble by Newton. On the first-down play, Panthers fullback Mike Tolbert fumbled for the first time this season at the end of a hard collision with Broncos safety Darian Stewart.

Second quarter, Broncos ball, third-and-8 at Carolina 24 (4:28 left) The Broncos popped a 33-yard run on the second play after Tolbert s fumble. Anderson shook free from nose tackle Star Lotulelei at the line of scrimmage, shoved free from Kuechly and broke linebacker Shaq Thompson s tackle try to rumble 34 yards on a play up the middle. It was one of four first downs in the first half for Denver.

Two failed Ronnie Hillman rushes later, Manning dropped back on third down. Staring left from the snap, Manning threw well behind wide receiver Emmanuel Sanders, and Panthers defensive end Kony Ealy was gifted an interception that hit him directly in his extended hands. On the play, linebacker Thomas Davis blitzed, steering Manning to his left, where the Panthers dropped Ealy off the line for the pick.

First quarter, Panthers ball, third-and-10, Carolina 15 (6:34 left) Newton was sacked at his own 5-yard line by Broncos outside Miller, who pawed the ball away. Jackson fell on the loose ball in the end zone for a touchdown and 10-0 Denver lead. The fumble recovery for a touchdown was the first in 22 years in the Super Bowl.

Miller gave Panthers right tackle Mike Remmers trouble for much of the quarter. On the sack-fumble, Remmers lunged the wrong way, and Miller was on Newton before the 6-foot-5, 250-pound quarterback completed a dropback. Newton was sacked twice in the quarter.

First quarter, Broncos ball, first-and-10, Denver 20 (14:56 left) On the first snap of the game, Manning lined up with three receivers and immediately faced a blitz Panthers defensive coordinator Sean McDermott brought pressure on the first two plays but hit tight end Owen Daniels for a gain of 18 yards. He completed a 6-yard pass on the next play. Then on third-and-4 from the Denver 38, Manning completed a 22-yard pass down the right sideline to wide receiver Andre Caldwell to put the Broncos in field-goal range.

Anderson had runs of 7 and 13 yards on consecutive plays, but the drive ended in McManus 34-yard field goal.

Super Bowl 50: Three Keys To Victory For Peyton Manning, Denver …

For a team that entered the playoffs as the AFC s No.

1 seed, the Denver Broncos sure have a chip 1 on their shoulders. The Broncos, who went 12-4 during the regular season, overcame the New England Patriots in the AFC Championship Game despite Tom Brady and Co. going into Denver as the favorites.

Now, the Broncos will ride into Super Bowl 50 again positioned as the underdogs 2 , with Cam Newton and the red-hot Carolina Panthers ready for war. It s been an interesting campaign for the Broncos, who took down the Pittsburgh Steelers in the divisional round before beating the Pats to punch their tickets to Super Bowl 50 at Levi s Stadium. Peyton Manning was the starting quarterback to begin the season, but Brock Osweiler took over for a seven-start stretch as the 39-year-old battled injuries and inconsistency before ultimately handing the keys back to the future Hall of Fame signal caller.

All the while, Denver s defense has dominated. But can anyone stop Carolina? The Panthers rolled through the regular season with a 15-1 record and have only looked better in the playoffs, holding off the Seattle Seahawks in the divisional round and pummeling the Arizona Cardinals in the NFC Championship Game.

The short answer 3 is yes if the Broncos do the following three things. COME OUT SWINGING The Panthers jumped out to a 31-0 lead in the first half of their playoff game against the Seahawks before holding on for a 31-24 win. They then grabbed a 17-0 lead in the first quarter of their conference title game against the Cardinals en route to a 49-15 blowout.

It goes without saying that any team would like to start hot, but it s vital for the Broncos to hit the ground running Sunday, especially since this isn t a new phenomenon. The Panthers outscored opponents 266-121 in the first halves of games during the regular season. In the playoffs, they ve simply kicked things up a notch to the tune of seven touchdowns and two field goals in 13 first-half possessions.

This isn t the same Broncos offense that gave nightmares to opposing defenses the last couple of years, in large part because Denver s aerial attack is far less explosive amid Manning s regression. The Broncos can t fall behind early and expect to claw their way back, and that s not even taking into account the mental impact of falling into a big hole while playing the role of underdog. FORCE CAM NEWTON TO THROW The Panthers love to run the ball.

Why? Because they re good at it. Carolina s offensive scheme centered on read-option plays is perfectly tailored to Newton s strengths and has been nearly unstoppable, evidenced by the Panthers second-ranked 142.6 rushing yards per game and NFL-best 31.3 points per game during the regular season.

Newton isn t a slouch at throwing the football, either, despite the Panthers ranking 27th in the NFL with 501 pass attempts. The Broncos had the top-ranked pass defense this season and the Panthers have relied on an underwhelming cast of receivers (outside of stud tight end Greg Olsen), though. Forcing Newton to throw more than Panthers offensive coordinator Mike Shula would like seems like the best way for Denver s vaunted defense to stall Carolina s sizzling offense.

Of course, that s easier said than done, but Denver has two fantastic edge rushers in Von Miller and DeMarcus Ware. So if any team has the horses to pull off such a feat, it s the Broncos. RELY ON PEYTON MANNING S EXPERIENCE The key to the Broncos offensive success might not be Manning s arm but rather his brain.

Manning no longer can zip the ball around the field. He barely can throw outside the numbers. The 18-year veteran still can read a defense and take advantage of favorable matchups, though, and if the Panthers have a weakness, it s in their secondary, which has been decimated by injuries.

Also, according to CBSSports.com, 16 current Broncos have played in a Super Bowl 4 whereas just five current Panthers have appeared in the big game.

It s a minor detail, but it s worth noting as each team looks for a mental edge before kickoff.

Thumbnail photo via Chris Humphreys/USA TODAY Sports Images References ^ have a chip (nesn.com) ^ positioned as the underdogs (nesn.com) ^ short answer (nesn.com) ^ played in a Super Bowl (www.cbssports.com)