Tagged: geography

Living Geography: Glocalisation

Living Geography: Glocalisation

Thanks to Miss Stockings for the lead to another McDonalds resource for glocalisation. Richard Allaway has previously shared images of meals that he has eaten in various McDonalds restaurants he has eaten in where the standard menu that is familiar the world over (the globalised version) is adapted for the local market (glocalisation) Glocalisation combines the words globalisation and localisation to emphasise the idea that a global product or service is more likely to succeed if it is adapted to the specific requirements of local practices and cultural expectations. The term started to appear in academic circles in the late 1980s, when Japanese economists used it in articles published by the Harvard Business Review .

For the sociologist Roland Robertson, who is often credited with popularising the term: glocalization means the simultaneity the co-presence of both universalizing and particularizing tendencies (Robertson, 1997, p.

4). Glocalisation combines the words globalisation and localisation to emphasise the idea that a global product or service is more likely to succeed if it is adapted to the specific requirements of local practices and cultural expectations. The term started to appear in academic circles in the late 1980s, when Japanese economists used it in articles published by the Harvard Business Review.

For the sociologist Roland Robertson, who is often credited with popularising the term: glocalization means the simultaneity the co-presence of both universalizing and particularizing tendencies (Robertson, 1997, p.

4). The resource is a food blog called Travelling McDs 1 , which is written by James McGowan who records the meals eaten on his global travels, which are quite extensive. He has eaten a number of meals which are adapted for the local palate, or to celebrate some aspect of the local culture.

Worth checking out – there are plenty of alternatives to the Big Mac here…

Image: McDonalds at Disneyland Paris – image by Alan Parkinson References ^ Travelling McDs (www.travellingmcds.com)

Research Paper: Calha Norte and Rain Forest Security

Research Paper: Calha Norte and Rain Forest Security

My research project will examine the nuances of rain forest control from an economic and political security standpoint. It will focus specifically upon the Calha Norte (Northern Headwaters) project, a program instigated by the Brazilian military dictatorship to establish military garrisons within the Amazon rain forest to extend its defense network. My research papers will examine this program and its impact upon indigenous peoples as well as its impact upon economic exploitation of the Amazon rain forest.

Sources: SECONDARY: Ryan, Michael B. Calha Norte: Explaining Brazilian Army Presence in the Amazon . (PhD diss., Naval Postgraduate School, 1993.) Hilgard O Reilly, Sternberg. Manifest Destiny and the Brazilian Amazon: A Backdrop to Contemporary Security and Development Issues.

Yearbook. Confrence of Latin Americanist Geographers.

12 (1987).

25-35. Simmons, Cynthia S.

et al. Spatial Processes in Scalar Context: Development and Security in the Brazilian Amazon. Journal of Latin American Geography .

6:1 ( 2007).

125-148. Toohey, David E. Indigenous Peoples, Environmental Groups, Networks and the Political Economy of Rainforest Destruction in Brazil.

International Journal of Peace Studies .

17:1 (2012).

73-97. Allen, Elizabeth. Calha Norte: Military Development in Brazilian Amazonia.

Development and Change .

23:1 (1992).

71-99. PRIMARY Brooke, James. Brazil is Moving to Rescue Tribe.

The New York Times , 27 March 1990. Rape of the Amazon: World s Largest Rainforest Being Lost to Destruction. The Ottawa Citizen , 24 September 1988.

I Fight Because I am Alive : An Interview with Davi Kopenawa Yanomami. Cultural Survivla Quarterly 15:3 (1991).

59. This project will examine a pertinent dynamic within Brazil today the question of the Amazon rain forest, the peoples living within it, and its dual use as conservation site and source of resources.

By examining the ways in which this issue was tackled thirty years ago, we can further our own understanding of both the complexities and nuances of Amazon politics, as well as learn from possible mistakes and errors made.

In addition, such a project will better allow one to understand the role of the Amazon within broader conceptualizations of Brazilian national security. .

Bookmark the .

The View from the Blue House: Review of Eleven Days by Stav …

The View from the Blue House: Review of Eleven Days by Stav …

Eleven days before Christmas a fire guts a small convent in a residential area of West London. Ten nuns are found dead in an upstairs room having seemingly made little effort to escape the inferno and an eleventh body is found in a confessional in the chapel. DI Jack Carrigan is handpicked by Assistant Chief Constable Quinn, head of the Catholic Police Association, to investigate the case with instructions to wrap it up quickly.

However, it soon becomes clear that this is no ordinary case, the victims were no ordinary nuns, and the identity of the eleventh victim may provide the answer to solving the crime. While Carrigan pursues a line of inquiry concerning the nuns on-going battle with Albanian criminals operating near to the convent, DS Geneva Miller concentrates on the work of the nuns in Peru in the 1970s and their links to liberation theology. Their progress is slowed by both internal politics and the church hierarchy, but Carrigan and Miller are determined coppers willing to confront difficult challenges.

Eleven Days is the second book in the Carrigan and Miller series. Like the first book, Sherez uses the format of a police procedural and London s diverse population to shine a light on fairly weighty political and social issues. In this case, the political turmoil and violence in Peru during the 1970s and the role of liberation theology and the contemporary movement of Albanian criminals into London s underworld and sex trafficking.

Both provide a menacing backdrop to Carrigan and Miller s investigation into the death of ten nuns and an unknown young woman. Hindering their investigation is the intransigence of the Catholic Church to share information about the nuns or their work and internal police politics. The result is an engaging and compelling tale full of gritty realism in which the politics is a crucial element of the story but never overly dominates it at its expense.

Moreover, Carrigan and Miller make for an interesting pairing as they battle their own personal demons.

I wasn t entirely convinced by the denouement, which I felt had one twist too many, but nonetheless a superior, thought-provoking, edge-of-seat police procedural that had me staying up late to keep the pages turning.

Four dead sperm whales wash up on British beaches

Four dead sperm whales wash up on British beaches

Four dead sperm whales wash up on British beaches January 24, 2016 Two dead sperm whales are seen washed up on a beach near Skegness in northeast England on January 24, 2016 in a photo released by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) on January 24, 2016 Four dead sperm whales have washed up on beaches in eastern England, coastguard authorities said Sunday, a week after similar deaths across the North Sea in Germany and the Netherlands. Two whales 1 washed up near the resort of Skegness on the English east coast on Saturday, said the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA). They laid side by side on the beach.

A third dead whale appeared on Sunday. They are thought to be from the same pod as a dead whale on Hunstanton beach, 25 kilometres (15 miles) across The Wash bay, which stranded and died on Friday. That young adult male was part of a group of six in The Wash. “It is unknown where the rest of the pod are at this stage,” the MCA said Sunday.

The whales are around 15 metres (48 feet) long. “We believe that the three whales at Skegness died at sea and then washed ashore,” said coastguard Richard Johnson. “We are advising members of the public to stay away from the beach. “We have informed the Receiver of Wreck and we are expecting an officer from the Zoological Society of London to attend the scene and carry out tests on the whales.” Doctor Peter Evans, director of the Seawatch Foundation, said the whales probably swam south looking for food but got disorientated. He believed they could have been part of a large pod, some of which beached in the Netherlands and Germany. The sperm whale is the largest of the toothed whales, and the largest toothed predator.

It can measure up to 20 metres (67 feet) long and weigh over 50 tonnes. It is 10 years since a northern bottlenose whale swam up the Thames in central London, bringing thousands to the riverbanks to see the extremely rare sight. The whale died during a rescue attempt on January 21, 2006.

Explore further: Six sperm whales die in rare mass beaching in Australia 2 2016 AFP More from Biology and Medical 3 Related Stories Six sperm whales die in rare mass beaching in Australia 4 December 8, 2014 A pod of six sperm whales washed up dead Monday in a rare mass stranding on the South Australia coast, with animal welfare officials struggling over the logistics of handling the huge carcasses. Almost 200 whales stranded on New Zealand beach 5 February 13, 2015 Almost 200 pilot whales stranded themselves Friday on a New Zealand beach renowned as a deathtrap for the marine mammals, conservation officials said. Whales on French beach may have washed up voluntarily: expert 6 November 2, 2015 A school of 10 whales that washed up Monday in northern France may have done so voluntarily after the death of the dominant male, an expert said.

Dozens of whales die after southern India stranding 7 January 12, 2016 Dozens of whales have died after stranding themselves on a southern Indian beach, a forestry official said Tuesday, with local fishermen struggling to save others. Five sperm whales stranded on Dutch beach 8 January 13, 2016 Five sperm whales were stranded on a Dutch beach on Tuesday, leading local authorities to urge people to stay away in order not to further distress the giant mammals. Two more sperm whales wash up dead on Dutch beach 9 January 14, 2016 Two more sperm whales became stranded and died on the Dutch coast a day after five others, likely from the same pod, lost their lives nearby in a rare North Sea beaching, experts said Thursday.

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Why Spiderman can’t exist: Geckos are ‘size limit’ for sticking to walls 12 January 18, 2016 Latest research reveals why geckos are the largest animals able to scale smooth vertical walls – even larger climbers would require unmanageably large sticky footpads. Scientists estimate that a human would need adhesive … Grafted plants’ genomes can communicate with each other 13 January 19, 2016 Agricultural grafting dates back nearly 3,000 years.

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0 comments Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more 16 17 Click here 18 to reset your password.

Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made. Four dead sperm whales wash up on British beaches January 24, 2016 Two dead sperm whales are seen washed up on a beach near Skegness in northeast England on January 24, 2016 in a photo released by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) on January 24, 2016 Four dead sperm whales have washed up on beaches in eastern England, coastguard authorities said Sunday, a week after similar deaths across the North Sea in Germany and the Netherlands. Two whales 19 washed up near the resort of Skegness on the English east coast on Saturday, said the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA).

They laid side by side on the beach. A third dead whale appeared on Sunday. They are thought to be from the same pod as a dead whale on Hunstanton beach, 25 kilometres (15 miles) across The Wash bay, which stranded and died on Friday.

That young adult male was part of a group of six in The Wash. “It is unknown where the rest of the pod are at this stage,” the MCA said Sunday. The whales are around 15 metres (48 feet) long. “We believe that the three whales at Skegness died at sea and then washed ashore,” said coastguard Richard Johnson. “We are advising members of the public to stay away from the beach. “We have informed the Receiver of Wreck and we are expecting an officer from the Zoological Society of London to attend the scene and carry out tests on the whales.” Doctor Peter Evans, director of the Seawatch Foundation, said the whales probably swam south looking for food but got disorientated. He believed they could have been part of a large pod, some of which beached in the Netherlands and Germany.

The sperm whale is the largest of the toothed whales, and the largest toothed predator. It can measure up to 20 metres (67 feet) long and weigh over 50 tonnes. It is 10 years since a northern bottlenose whale swam up the Thames in central London, bringing thousands to the riverbanks to see the extremely rare sight.

The whale died during a rescue attempt on January 21, 2006. Explore further: Six sperm whales die in rare mass beaching in Australia 20 2016 AFP More from Biology and Medical 21 Related Stories Six sperm whales die in rare mass beaching in Australia 22 December 8, 2014 A pod of six sperm whales washed up dead Monday in a rare mass stranding on the South Australia coast, with animal welfare officials struggling over the logistics of handling the huge carcasses. Almost 200 whales stranded on New Zealand beach 23 February 13, 2015 Almost 200 pilot whales stranded themselves Friday on a New Zealand beach renowned as a deathtrap for the marine mammals, conservation officials said.

Whales on French beach may have washed up voluntarily: expert 24 November 2, 2015 A school of 10 whales that washed up Monday in northern France may have done so voluntarily after the death of the dominant male, an expert said. Dozens of whales die after southern India stranding 25 January 12, 2016 Dozens of whales have died after stranding themselves on a southern Indian beach, a forestry official said Tuesday, with local fishermen struggling to save others. Five sperm whales stranded on Dutch beach 26 January 13, 2016 Five sperm whales were stranded on a Dutch beach on Tuesday, leading local authorities to urge people to stay away in order not to further distress the giant mammals.

Two more sperm whales wash up dead on Dutch beach 27 January 14, 2016 Two more sperm whales became stranded and died on the Dutch coast a day after five others, likely from the same pod, lost their lives nearby in a rare North Sea beaching, experts said Thursday. Recommended for you The hideout of the Black Death: Historical pathogens survived for more than 4 centuries in Europe 28 January 22, 2016 Black Death, mid-fourteenth century plague, is undoubtedly the most famous historical pandemic. Within only five years it killed 30-50% of the European population.

Unfortunately it didn’t stop there. Plague resurged throughout … Hunting secrets of the Venus flytrap (hint: they can count) 29 January 21, 2016 Carnivorous plants such as the Venus flytrap depend on meals of insects to survive in nutrient-poor soil.

They sense the arrival of juicy insects, lured by the plants’ fruity scent, with the aid of sensitive trigger hairs … Why Spiderman can’t exist: Geckos are ‘size limit’ for sticking to walls 30 January 18, 2016 Latest research reveals why geckos are the largest animals able to scale smooth vertical walls – even larger climbers would require unmanageably large sticky footpads. Scientists estimate that a human would need adhesive …

Grafted plants’ genomes can communicate with each other 31 January 19, 2016 Agricultural grafting dates back nearly 3,000 years. By trial and error, people from ancient China to ancient Greece realized that joining a cut branch from one plant onto the stalk of another could improve the quality of … Tardigrade brought back to life after being frozen for thirty years 32 January 18, 2016 (Phys.org) A trio of researchers with Japan’s National Institute of Polar Research has found that a microscopic creature known as a tardigrade, was able to “come back to life” after being frozen for over thirty years.

In … Evolutionary clock ticks for snowshoe hares facing climate change 33 January 22, 2016 Snowshoe hares that camouflage themselves by changing their coats from brown in summer to white in winter face serious threats from climate change, and it’s uncertain whether hare populations will be able to adapt in time, …

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Read more 34 35 Click here to reset your password.

Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made. 36 References ^ whales (phys.org) ^ Six sperm whales die in rare mass beaching in Australia (phys.org) ^ Biology and Medical (www.physicsforums.com) ^ Six sperm whales die in rare mass beaching in Australia (phys.org) ^ Almost 200 whales stranded on New Zealand beach (phys.org) ^ Whales on French beach may have washed up voluntarily: expert (phys.org) ^ Dozens of whales die after southern India stranding (phys.org) ^ Five sperm whales stranded on Dutch beach (phys.org) ^ Two more sperm whales wash up dead on Dutch beach (phys.org) ^ The hideout of the Black Death: Historical pathogens survived for more than 4 centuries in Europe (phys.org) ^ Hunting secrets of the Venus flytrap (hint: they can count) (phys.org) ^ Why Spiderman can’t exist: Geckos are ‘size limit’ for sticking to walls (phys.org) ^ Grafted plants’ genomes can communicate with each other (phys.org) ^ Tardigrade brought back to life after being frozen for thirty years (phys.org) ^ Evolutionary clock ticks for snowshoe hares facing climate change (phys.org) ^ sign in (sciencex.com) ^ Read more (sciencex.com) ^ Click here (sciencex.com) ^ whales (phys.org) ^ Six sperm whales die in rare mass beaching in Australia (phys.org) ^ Biology and Medical (www.physicsforums.com) ^ Six sperm whales die in rare mass beaching in Australia (phys.org) ^ Almost 200 whales stranded on New Zealand beach (phys.org) ^ Whales on French beach may have washed up voluntarily: expert (phys.org) ^ Dozens of whales die after southern India stranding (phys.org) ^ Five sperm whales stranded on Dutch beach (phys.org) ^ Two more sperm whales wash up dead on Dutch beach (phys.org) ^ The hideout of the Black Death: Historical pathogens survived for more than 4 centuries in Europe (phys.org) ^ Hunting secrets of the Venus flytrap (hint: they can count) (phys.org) ^ Why Spiderman can’t exist: Geckos are ‘size limit’ for sticking to walls (phys.org) ^ Grafted plants’ genomes can communicate with each other (phys.org) ^ Tardigrade brought back to life after being frozen for thirty years (phys.org) ^ Evolutionary clock ticks for snowshoe hares facing climate change (phys.org) ^ sign in (sciencex.com) ^ Read more (sciencex.com) ^ Click here (sciencex.com)

Living Geography: Dan's London Essay

Living Geography: Dan's London Essay

We should not see childhood just as a period of time; we should see it as a place. One of the people who inspires me is my friend Daniel Raven Ellison. His latest piece of geography inspiration is his essay on the importance of play for children within the context of London.

It’s on the LONDON ESSAY website. 1 The childhood that Dan describes was also mine, back in the early 1970s when I was a teenager. Although my parents later told me that they by no means ‘forgot about me’ when I was out, there was a lot of my time that was spent in the local woods and round at friends. Later, I used to cycle most nights the seven miles to a friend’s house after he moved.

I’ve blogged previously about the woods where I used to play as a child. Dan describes the shrinking distances that parents are allowing their children to stray from their homes, and there is a map created specially for the post by Peter Boyce and Charlie Peel. Head over to the site and read the whole essay, and then take your kids out for a walk in the woods…

References ^ It’s on the LONDON ESSAY website. (essays.centreforlondon.org)